'How to Reassess Your Chess'. (Silman)

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As I posted above, I've been out of serious chess for 20 years. I read the
article on Chessville:
http://www.chessville.com/instruction/instr_gen_path_to_improve.htm

and it certainly had some good suggestions. One book in the second grouping
they suggest studying is How to Reassess Your Chess. I found it at Border's
book store along with its companion workbook.

Has anyone stdied this book and if so can you give me your opinion of it? I
was previously at about 2000 Expert strength but I realize the need to start
once again with the basics...before I reaquire bad habits.

Thanks for all your help!!!1

John
 
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Yes, HTRYC is a great book. Your having been an expert (as opposed to
your being a novice) may render the following caveat redundant, but
perhaps you should read it in any case... go to:

http://www.chesscafe.com/archives/archives.htm#Novice%20Nook

and then click on the link for July 2001 "Chess Books and
Prerequisites"

(You'll need a PDF reader of some sort).

Indeed, I recommend reading all of Dan Heisman's columns in the
interest of warding off the reacquisition of bad habits....

In the light of Dan's "Chess Books and Prerequisites" column, you might
like to read Silman's "The Amateur's Mind" before HTRYC, but then again
it may be that you don't need (or simply don't want) to do that. I hope
that you can, at least, make a more informed choice.

Mark
 
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I discovered a nice chess club not far from my home! It's all coming
together now. I also was able to purchase HTRYC last night. While reading
the chapter on end games I was amazed at how much I'd forgotten. It's good
to study chess again.

The end game problems were challenging so I think this book will keep me
interested....

One thing though, I'm disappointed in Fritz' end game strength. It seemed to
choke on #20. Oh well....

john

"Mark Houlsby" <mark.houlsby@eudoramail.com> wrote in message
news:1113488037.387062.286760@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Yes, HTRYC is a great book. Your having been an expert (as opposed to
> your being a novice) may render the following caveat redundant, but
> perhaps you should read it in any case... go to:
>
> http://www.chesscafe.com/archives/archives.htm#Novice%20Nook
>
> and then click on the link for July 2001 "Chess Books and
> Prerequisites"
>
> (You'll need a PDF reader of some sort).
>
> Indeed, I recommend reading all of Dan Heisman's columns in the
> interest of warding off the reacquisition of bad habits....
>
> In the light of Dan's "Chess Books and Prerequisites" column, you might
> like to read Silman's "The Amateur's Mind" before HTRYC, but then again
> it may be that you don't need (or simply don't want) to do that. I hope
> that you can, at least, make a more informed choice.
>
> Mark
>
 
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Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

The best thing you can study is tactics. If you do only that you can improve
to 2000. Silman's book is wonderful but it takes serious study and at your
level I doubt it will help all that much.

"John J." <detectorist@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ACu7e.44448$Pc.12404@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
> As I posted above, I've been out of serious chess for 20 years. I read the
> article on Chessville:
> http://www.chessville.com/instruction/instr_gen_path_to_improve.htm
>
> and it certainly had some good suggestions. One book in the second
> grouping they suggest studying is How to Reassess Your Chess. I found it
> at Border's book store along with its companion workbook.
>
> Has anyone stdied this book and if so can you give me your opinion of it?
> I was previously at about 2000 Expert strength but I realize the need to
> start once again with the basics...before I reaquire bad habits.
>
> Thanks for all your help!!!1
>
> John
>
 

Ron

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Apr 1, 2004
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Archived from groups: rec.games.chess.computer (More info?)

I'm a big fan of Silman's book. It's fundamentally a middlegame
planning book (with some digressions into rook endings), and, as such, I
think it's one of the best on the market - Silman's prose is very
readable, he picks clear, interesting examples, which he annotates well.

I suspect that a 2000 would bear near the upper end of the people who
could benefit from this book, but I'm not that strong myself so it's
hard to say. Parts of it will certainly be beneath you, but I suspect
that parts of it will be very useful, as well.

-Ron