Question How to run my pc in raid 0

tomoleary97

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Mar 9, 2018
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I have quite a old motherboard but heard that you can format your drives in raid 0 through windows 10 but when i go to do it i can only see one of my SSD's when i have 2 and and HDD am i missing something or should i just do it through my bios?
 
What you are missing is a good reason for raid-0.
Raid-0 has been over hyped as a performance enhancer.
Sequential benchmarks do look wonderful, but the real world does not seem to deliver the indicated performance benefits for most
desktop users. The reason is, that sequential benchmarks are coded for maximum overlapped I/O rates.
It depends on reading a stripe of data simultaneously from each raid-0 member, and that is rarely what we do.
The OS does mostly small random reads and writes, so raid-0 is of little use there.
In fact, if your block of data were to be spanned on two drives, random times would be greater.
There are some apps that will benefit. They are characterized by reading large files in a sequential overlapped manner.

Here is a older study using ssd devices in raid-0.
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ssd-raid-benchmark,3485.html
Spoiler... no benefit at all.

You set up raid-0 in the bios.
Windows sees the pair as a single drive with blocks interleaved on each drive.
Perhaps you are thinking about the JBOD capability in windows to aggregate two drives to look like one.
 
Unless you do one of the following:
  • Real-time video editing (lots of it, not just an occasional home video; real-time meaning you sit in front of the computer doing it instead of setting up a bunch of background encodes)
  • Massive data analysis / encryption / compression (gigabytes of data)
  • Graphics editing of enormous images (hundreds or thousands of megapixels) requiring frequent saves and loads
banish all thoughts of using RAID-0. It will have no benefit or an imperceptibly small benefit, while doubling your risk of data loss and may even slow down your system. You have to understand that RAID-0 got started way back when hard drives were so slow you couldn't play video off of them (they couldn't read the video file fast enough to keep up with the video stream). So your only choices were to buy a special (expensive) "media drive" which was fast enough to stream video, or put together a RAID-0 array. Modern drives have no such problems, which relegates the usefulness of RAID-0 to the above extreme cases.
 
Jun 29, 2018
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If your motherboard is old like SATA 2 or 1 old .. then Raid 0 will help alot ...

if your SSD drives are slow and not top end , also Raid 0 will help alot.

That Tomshardware Article about no real gain felt was made with top of t the TOP SSD with best specs and modern Sata 3 ports.

it is up to you to test the performance and decide if it is worth it.
 

tomoleary97

Prominent
Mar 9, 2018
19
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510
0
Unless you do one of the following:
  • Real-time video editing (lots of it, not just an occasional home video; real-time meaning you sit in front of the computer doing it instead of setting up a bunch of background encodes)
  • Massive data analysis / encryption / compression (gigabytes of data)
  • Graphics editing of enormous images (hundreds or thousands of megapixels) requiring frequent saves and loads
banish all thoughts of using RAID-0. It will have no benefit or an imperceptibly small benefit, while doubling your risk of data loss and may even slow down your system. You have to understand that RAID-0 got started way back when hard drives were so slow you couldn't play video off of them (they couldn't read the video file fast enough to keep up with the video stream). So your only choices were to buy a special (expensive) "media drive" which was fast enough to stream video, or put together a RAID-0 array. Modern drives have no such problems, which relegates the usefulness of RAID-0 to the above extreme cases.
This PC is being used for a lot of video editing as well as tons of graphical editing i just dont know why only one of my drives shows up when i try raid through windows or should i just do it through bios?
 

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