Question How to set pump speed at 100%

memmeeyee

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I am currently using a 120mm 3 pin pump in my pc. I plugged the pump power into the CPU_FAN header on my Asus motherboard so I know I am not getting 100% from the pump. I want to know how to set it on 100% constant on my ash’s motherboard.
 

memmeeyee

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Why do you want the pump at 100%?
What motherboard do you have?

The pump will increase as temperatures increase.
[/QUOTE
Cause that’s how it’s supposed to be? I want temps as low as possible since the pump kind of needs to be at 100% for circulation. I don’t want it to increase as temperatures increase. It’s like at 50% judging by the temps I’m getting
 

Jay_dog

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What are your specs?
Does your motherboard have an AIO Pump header pin?

Also sorry I was thinking of the fans. If you have it in the correct header it'll default to 100% and just plug the fans connected to the AIO in the CPU FAN header.
 

memmeeyee

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What are your specs?
Does your motherboard have an AIO Pump header pin?

Also sorry I was thinking of the fans. If you have it in the correct header it'll default to 100% and just plug the fans connected to the AIO in the CPU FAN header.
That’s the thing, I have it plugged it into the CPU_FAN header, I don’t have an AIO_PUMp header, so I’m trying to find a way I can leave it on it 100% using the CPU_FAN Header, since I know people have done it. I have the acre h170 pro gaming motherboard
 

Jay_dog

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In BIOS:
Pump Control --> DC (Manual)
All Duty Cycles --> 100%

If that doesn't work switch the control to manual in the bios and set speeds to max at all temps.
 

Karadjgne

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Ok. Hold up before things get funky lol.

You don't need a aio_Pump header, at all. Never have. Aios are rated to run from any fan header, same as a fan. There's 2 basic kinds of aios ones that use Sata power and ones that do not.

The ones with only header power have 2 ways to install. 99% of all factory instructions will tell you to install the pump to cpu_fan and the fan to any sys_fan header. This is done because the life expectancy of the pump is smaller than that of the fan, so IF the pump fails it will set off an alarm in the cpu and the cpu will shut down the pc automatically to prevent damage. However, that puts fan control on the motherboard temp sensor, which is next to useless.

The other way, which is the preferred method for any user outside of being fastidious to adherence to factory directions is to put the pump on a sys_fan header and the fan being controlled by cpu_fan header, so the fan speeds up/down according to cpu temps. The pump should be set in bios to run 100% because almost all pumps are not rated nor designed for variable speed usage. They are designed for a constant 12v.

So to answer the question, in most bios you'll find a section for fan adjustment, on my Asus it's at the bottom of the second tab. You would set the duty cycle for cpu at Minimum for 100%, Maximum will be default 100%.

But honestly, I'd use the fan on cpu, pump on sys. It works better that way. Use Coretemp or Realtemp to keep a cpu temp number in the Taskbar info where it's easily watched (right hand side next to the clock)

Only difference in bios setting would be to allow qFan on cpu to be silent, standard or performance etc, and qFan for the sys_fan header with the pump will be disabled and have 100% min/max
 
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memmeeyee

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That’s the thing, I have it plugged it into the CPU_FAN header, I don’t have an AIO_PUMp header, so I’m trying to find a way I can leave it on it 100% using the CPU_FAN Header, since I know people have done it
Ok. Hold up before things get funky lol.

You don't need a aio_Pump header, at all. Never have. Aios are rated to run from any fan header, same as a fan. There's 2 basic kinds of aios ones that use Sata power and ones that do not.

The ones with only header power have 2 ways to install. 99% of all factory instructions will tell you to install the pump to cpu_fan and the fan to any sys_fan header. This is done because the life expectancy of the pump is smaller than that of the fan, so IF the pump fails it will set off an alarm in the cpu and the cpu will shut down the pc automatically to prevent damage. However, that puts fan control on the motherboard temp sensor, which is next to useless.

The other way, which is the preferred method for any user outside of being fastidious to adherence to factory directions is to put the pump on a sys_fan header and the fan being controlled by cpu_fan header, so the fan speeds up/down according to cpu temps. The pump should be set in bios to run 100% because almost all pumps are not rated nor designed for variable speed usage. They are designed for a constant 12v.

So to answer the question, in most bios you'll find a section for fan adjustment, on my Asus it's at the bottom of the second tab. You would set the duty cycle for cpu at Minimum for 100%, Maximum will be default 100%.

But honestly, I'd use the fan on cpu, pump on sys. It works better that way. Use Coretemp or Realtemp to keep a cpu temp number in the Taskbar info where it's easily watched (right hand side next to the clock)

Only difference in bios setting would be to allow qFan on cpu to be silent, standard or performance etc, and qFan for the sys_fan header with the pump will be disabled and have 100% min/max
so, i have it plugged in the cpu_fan and there is absolutely no option that says “pump” or “AIO” for fan control. I am in ez mode and went to qfan config and set cpu fan to 100% and my actual cpu fan increased in rpm since I literally heard it spin louder even though the pump is in cpu_fan and the actual cpu fan is in CPU_OPT so I don’t really know what to do. A STEP BY STEP guide would be really helpful though. Ik I’m not getting 100% bc 1. It’s literally almost inadauible, not saying that it would be a jet engine at full speed, 2. Other people with the same card and a normal 120mm AIO just like mine don’t reach over 48c under max load and idle in 20s after a long time of gaming, I get close to 63c and idle high 30s.
 
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Karadjgne

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Ah. There isn't anything that says AIO or PUMP in the fan controls, a pump isn't a fan. And those are fan headers, not a pump header. The pump is designed to USE a fan header.

Cpu_opt is cpu optional header, it's the same thing as cpu_fan.

You need to use a seperate header, not one that's linked together to be the same thing.

Put the fan to Cpu_fan. Put the pump to cha_fan (sys_fan, they change between vendors, means chassis or system, same thing different name). In bios you'd put qFan to whichever performance setting you want for cpu_fan and for the sys_fan, that goes to min:100%
 

Karadjgne

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2. Other people with the same card and a normal 120mm AIO just like mine don’t reach over 48c under max load and idle in 20s after a long time of gaming, I get close to 63c and idle high 30s.
? Same card? I can understand loads reaching only 48, but idle in the 20's for either a cpu or gpu is only possible if the pc was about frigid cold. Case temps are about 6-12°C higher than room ambient temps, and cpus/gpus will be slightly warmer than that. Figure most average airflow or better will have a cpu at 32°C with an ambient of 22°C.

Those temps in the 20's means room temps in the teens, and 15°C (25°C cpu) is 59°F in the room!
 

memmeeyee

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? Same card? I can understand loads reaching only 48, but idle in the 20's for either a cpu or gpu is only possible if the pc was about frigid cold. Case temps are about 6-12°C higher than room ambient temps, and cpus/gpus will be slightly warmer than that. Figure most average airflow or better will have a cpu at 32°C with an ambient of 22°C.

Those temps in the 20's means room temps in the teens, and 15°C (25°C cpu) is 59°F in the room!
People claimed they would get temps anywhere in the 20s when they put an120mm AIO on their GPU judging by a lot of Amazon reviews I saw. I’m gonna try and put that pump into one of the CHA_FANS and see if it’s actually increases the pump and get back to you
 

grimfox

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I have a custom loop with a 280mm rad. my idle temps are mid 30s. A single 120 rad, I seriously doubt could keep temps that low on anything more than a low power CPU(less than 40W). If I run my fans at full I can pull the fluid temp down to around 30C sometimes lower in the winter. That puts the CPU temp in the low 30s at idle.

Amazon reviews have been known to carry false reports. Manufacturers pay random people on the internet to post a fake review or 10.
 

memmeeyee

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I have a custom loop with a 280mm rad. my idle temps are mid 30s. A single 120 rad, I seriously doubt could keep temps that low on anything more than a low power CPU(less than 40W). If I run my fans at full I can pull the fluid temp down to around 30C sometimes lower in the winter. That puts the CPU temp in the low 30s at idle.

Amazon reviews have been known to carry false reports. Manufacturers pay random people on the internet to post a fake review or 10.
Even though that may be true, I have watched many videos of people using 120mm aios on their GPU and getting less than 50c under max load I’m getting +10 and pump speed is at 100%
 

rubix_1011

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People claimed they would get temps anywhere in the 20s when they put an120mm AIO on their GPU judging by a lot of Amazon reviews I saw. I’m gonna try and put that pump into one of the CHA_FANS and see if it’s actually increases the pump and get back to you
Air and liquid cooling can never go below ambient room temperatures (its impossible), so if they are seeing 20C idle temps, they either have a very cold room or they have a sensor issue...or they're lying. If the room warms up that the PC resides in, your idle temps will go up also...this is a property of thermodynamics and cooling delta of the cooler being used.

The cooler can only work as well as the cooling delta it is capable of, meaning, if the actual room temp is 30C and your reported idle temps are 5C, you have a 5C delta (at idle). If the room is 30C and your temp is 75C at load, you have a 45C delta based on reported temps. Simple math is (temp - ambient = delta).

Cooling deltas are better determined at peak usage (100%/full load) to determine effectiveness of the cooler at the maximum rated capacity of the device being monitored. It's easy to cool something that isn't doing any work. Likewise, you can easily oversee the need to have better cooling at full load if this isn't taken into consideration.

Just having a liquid cooler doesn't make it a good one and radiator size does make a difference in the amount of thermal load that can be dissipated effectively over time under loads, making your load delta lower.
 

memmeeyee

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View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMxkU7DbURw


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0NL2ueZYDA&t=222s


In the 2nd video, he is literally using the exact same gpu, thermal paste, and aio that I HAVE on his setup, and he is getting BETTER TEMPS than me

PUMP SPEED is at 100%

The only thing that I can think of is that is restricting me from getting as good of temps as listed in the 2nd video is:
  1. I didn't screw in the G12's mounting screws in enough making less of a heat transfer due to not enough contact with the GPU dye
  2. thermal paste application failed to spread over the entire GPU dye
  3. Fan placement on the radiator
 
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Karadjgne

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Ah. There's multiple other factors besides hardware choice. He doesn't really go into how the gpu is setup, how the airflow and ambient temps of a test bench affects the airflow and temps inside your case etc. His point isn't the actual temps the cooler is capable of, his point is the comparison between what he started out with vs what he ended up with vs how much performance gain the gpu saw and is capable of.

If stock you saw 90°C, his numbers would show you'd be closer to 70°C ish with the upgrade. That just says you have an extra 20°C to play with, not that you will hit the 67°C he did etc.

On a test bench, assume the room is a more comfortable 20°C. The inside of your case will be closer to 30°C. You cannot cool an object below ambient temp by mechanical means. It's impossible. You can't blow 30°C air through a rad and expect the gpu to be at 20°C. Only a chemical process like phase change, LN2, peltier etc is capable of that feat. So idle at best will be closer to 30°C no matter what his video shows. You'd have to mount that aio as intake and be using 20°C air to lower the gpu temp at idle, but even then the gpu has its limits, it's electronic and gives off a certain amount of heat.

Your temps went down. That's the purpose of the better cooling. Not matching a pc that's setup and tested differently to yours.

Also have to figure fan speed. Unless you manually set the fan speed for 100% (not pump), your fan will be controlled by the cpu temp, since it's on the cpu header. So fan speeds will vary according to cpu loads, not gpu loads. The way around that is to use an adapter to change the mini molex the gpu uses for the stock fans and plug in the rad fan to that connection. Then the rad fan will vary in speeds according to gpu temps, not cpu temps. Then you can adjust the gpu fan curve using PrecisionX or Afterburner to get temps and curves you are comfortable having for the gpu and your usage.
 
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memmeeyee

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Ah. There's multiple other factors besides hardware choice. He doesn't really go into how the gpu is setup, how the airflow and ambient temps of a test bench affects the airflow and temps inside your case etc. His point isn't the actual temps the cooler is capable of, his point is the comparison between what he started out with vs what he ended up with vs how much performance gain the gpu saw and is capable of.

If stock you saw 90°C, his numbers would show you'd be closer to 70°C ish with the upgrade. That just says you have an extra 20°C to play with, not that you will hit the 67°C he did etc.

On a test bench, assume the room is a more comfortable 20°C. The inside of your case will be closer to 30°C. You cannot cool an object below ambient temp by mechanical means. It's impossible. You can't blow 30°C air through a rad and expect the gpu to be at 20°C. Only a chemical process like phase change, LN2, peltier etc is capable of that feat. So idle at best will be closer to 30°C no matter what his video shows. You'd have to mount that aio as intake and be using 20°C air to lower the gpu temp at idle, but even then the gpu has its limits, it's electronic and gives off a certain amount of heat.

Your temps went down. That's the purpose of the better cooling. Not matching a pc that's setup and tested differently to yours.

Also have to figure fan speed. Unless you manually set the fan speed for 100% (not pump), your fan will be controlled by the cpu temp, since it's on the cpu header. So fan speeds will vary according to cpu loads, not gpu loads. The way around that is to use an adapter to change the mini molex the gpu uses for the stock fans and plug in the rad fan to that connection. Then the rad fan will vary in speeds according to gpu temps, not cpu temps. Then you can adjust the gpu fan curve using PrecisionX or Afterburner to get temps and curves you are comfortable having for the gpu and your usage.
You may be correct but the thing is i see multiple reviews on amazon that put the 120mm aio in the same place, can have the same mid-tower gaming case, and almost same airflow as mine, and the same ambient temp and they will never exceed 47c max. So that brought me to the conclusion that it has to be fans, thermal paste, or screws. Like it literally have almost the same idle temp AS MY FE REFERENCE COOLER. For example, this is a review i found on amazon


"OMG!!! So I was overclocking my Zotac 1080 ti Amp Edtion and was watching the temps hitting 80+ C on the GPU. That didn't sit too well with me. I watched some videos and read some reviews about this thing and most were pretty positive and their results were in the realm of "too good to be true". Even if it were true, I had all kinds of apprehensions about tearing my pricey video card apart. As it turns out, my fears were unfounded.

The instructions that came with the G12 are very generic but it clued me in well enough that I was able to decipher the rest. Installation was remarkably simpler than I expected. 5 screws is all that held the stock cooler to the card. I had to use a little wiggle action to pry the card loose from the cooler but it relented. Be careful of the wires as there are 2 of them on this card. They unplugged with little protest though. I cleaned off the mountain of old thermal paste on the GPU itself. I think they went a little overboard at the factory. Since I was installing a new AIO I didn't need to apply any new paste as it came pre-applied. The only hiccup was when I was mounting the radiator onto the rear of the case where a 120mm fan previously resided. Although the Corsair H55 included the long mounting screws for the fan, it didn't come with short screws to mount to the case on the other side. I suppose I could have put the screws through the case, then through the fan to the radiator but I preferred my led fan visible from inside the case so I can marvel at my own magnificence. I guess it was a very good thing I had bought an assortment of extra screws way back when and now that purchase has finally paid off! HA! My Corsair 400c accommodates a 240mm radiator in the front as well as a 120mm radiator in the rear. I'm glad I made that rear radiator an exhaust since the air coming out is pretty hot. Since the installation I haven't seen the GPU get any hotter than 47 degrees no matter what I do!

I think it's really up to the individual at this point. For me the stars and planets aligned and the GPU gods took pity on me and saw that I lost the GPU lottery so they blessed me with cooling. Not all video cards are made the same and I think some don't react well to being taken apart. Luckily the Zotac 1080 ti Amp Edition wasn't such a chore and my case has radiator options. The risk is great but the payoff may well be worth it."

And the pictures were literally exactly the same setup as mine, same rear aio placement, hose orientation, even the same cpu fan

And even this review

"
I've only had this up and running for a couple of days, if anything changes, I will update this review.

I installed the G12 on an Nvidia 1080ti FE. This card has a blower style stock cooler, and it's designed to run at fairly high temps (mine would idle in the 40-50C range with the blower running at low, while gaming it would be in the upper 60-70's and the fan sounded like a vacuum cleaner.
After installation, idle is pinned to the ambient air temp - 23C! After gaming for several hours, temps got into the mid 30's! I'm seeing a 30-40 degree temp drop, which is much better than expected. After gaming, I also ran some user benchmarks, and the card is running as expected, with no thermal throttling, and slightly higher frequencies (I'm voltage limited right now).

I paired this bracket with a Corsair H55, with 2 fans in a push pull configuration, I also applied heat sinks to all mosfets and memory chips, similar to the top comment, but did not use thermal pads.

Parts used in my build:
1080Ti FE
NZXT G12
Corsair H55
GPU fan adapter - lets the GPU control the H55 fan speed
Noctua NF-A12x15 PWM, 4-Pin Premium Quiet Slim Fan (comes with Y adapter, so both radiator fans can be controlled by the GPU)
Cosmos 20 PCS mini Aluminum Chips VGA RAM Cooling Heatsinks (for Mosfets)
Cosmos 8 PCS Copper VGA RAM Cooling Heatsinks (for RAM)
Cooler Master Thermal paste "

This actually worries me and pisses me off, i should be getting those temps easily and im not even sure why. AND THEIR PUMP IS EVEN AT A LOWER SPEED **** theirs is lower than 4800 RPM and MINE IS OVER 5000 RPM

I literally have a lower ambient than him WTF. I really need a find a solution, I should be getting those temps easily, so i had to install something not enough or incorrectly. And 90% of the reviews i see have under 50c temps WITH THE SAME SETUP and a 120 AIO the other 10% is not running their pump speed at 100%
 
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Karadjgne

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Might be. I personally like the Noctua paste, it's right at the top of the performance charts along with the Thermal Grizzly, Phanteks, Gelid pastes. For a cpu that has an IHS with its own Tim underneath . For a gpu, that has direct die, all chipset, no IHS, no other Tim. Many people prefer Arctic MX-4 for that as it's a little thicker, more viscous and doesn't push out from the die as easily.

And don't overtighten the screws, they only need to be good and snug, after they are fully seated it's on the bracket to hold pressure, the screws just need to hold the bracket in place.

Fans are funky. The best rad fan ever for an aio radiator was the Scythe Gentle Typhoon. It had mediocre cfm and mediocre static pressure, but that exact combination was the perfect ratio for the rad. Increase either cfm or sp and performance got worse, air moved too fast through the fins or not fast enough and that affected the fins dissipative efficiency, and could become a disadvantage. But finding an original design Scythe GT is next to impossible nowadays, although there are many clones, even the Noctua A12x25 has a similar design now, somewhat different fan blade from the GTs biggest competition, the Noctua NF-F12.

Matching the fan to the rads properties is what's most important, not assuming a rad is a rad and therefore must have the highest sp and cfm available. Stock rad fans generally come close to decent, but can usually be improved upon using a different brand. The trick is to find what brand and model works best for that rad, not which is the best fan for sp/cfm.
 
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memmeeyee

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Might be. I personally like the Noctua paste, it's right at the top of the performance charts along with the Thermal Grizzly, Phanteks, Gelid pastes. For a cpu that has an IHS with its own Tim underneath . For a gpu, that has direct die, all chipset, no IHS, no other Tim. Many people prefer Arctic MX-4 for that as it's a little thicker, more viscous and doesn't push out from the die as easily.

And don't overtighten the screws, they only need to be good and snug, after they are fully seated it's on the bracket to hold pressure, the screws just need to hold the bracket in place.

Fans are funky. The best rad fan ever for an aio radiator was the Scythe Gentle Typhoon. It had mediocre cfm and mediocre static pressure, but that exact combination was the perfect ratio for the rad. Increase either cfm or sp and performance got worse, air moved too fast through the fins or not fast enough and that affected the fins dissipative efficiency, and could become a disadvantage. But finding an original design Scythe GT is next to impossible nowadays, although there are many clones, even the Noctua A12x25 has a similar design now, somewhat different fan blade from the GTs biggest competition, the Noctua NF-F12.

Matching the fan to the rads properties is what's most important, not assuming a rad is a rad and therefore must have the highest sp and cfm available. Stock rad fans generally come close to decent, but can usually be improved upon using a different brand. The trick is to find what brand and model works best for that rad, not which is the best fan for sp/cfm.
Didnt expect you to reply that fast, i made some edits with what i said, take a look at it. BTW i do use noctua nt-h1, i even put aluminum and copper heatsinks on the vrm/vram and i get way higher temps then these people, what is happening.
 
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Karadjgne

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You didn't do anything wrong. Your temps are fine. For all you know dude undervolted his card from stock, which is common for the 1080ti as it did run hot. There's a lot of variables that are different and you are stuck on a specific. Stop. You have no clue as to exactly what his global settings are, we're they set for quality or performance in NVCP, did he have buffers lowered, pre-renders changed from default 3 to 1 or any of a hundred other variables added/disabled. You got what was needed, a pretty drastic drop in temps. You are assuming his final temp is what is relevant. It isn't. What's relevant is the drop itself.

Oh, I have a Corsair H55, it's set for 12v 100% duty cycle, figure it's at 100% any which way you want to. It's rpm as notated by bios, Cam, SpeedFan, Asus Suite is 2400rpm±.
 

memmeeyee

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You didn't do anything wrong. Your temps are fine. For all you know dude undervolted his card from stock, which is common for the 1080ti as it did run hot. There's a lot of variables that are different and you are stuck on a specific. Stop. You have no clue as to exactly what his global settings are, we're they set for quality or performance in NVCP, did he have buffers lowered, pre-renders changed from default 3 to 1 or any of a hundred other variables added/disabled. You got what was needed, a pretty drastic drop in temps. You are assuming his final temp is what is relevant. It isn't. What's relevant is the drop itself.

Oh, I have a Corsair H55, it's set for 12v 100% duty cycle, figure it's at 100% any which way you want to. It's rpm as notated by bios, Cam, SpeedFan, Asus Suite is 2400rpm±.
True, but i also see people who Oc their cards and i still get higher temps than them so it would be obvious to assume they are on "prefer maximum performance" in NVCP, and obviously didnt undervolt their cards. My card is at stock in msi afterburner. And even on the amazon reviews many reviews there card was running over 80c and then when they installed a 120mm AIO under 50c, like I ran cooler than there cards when I had my original FE cooler, it doesn’t make any sense to me.
 
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memmeeyee

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Ok, so I found an amazon review and a guy posted his score to unigine heaven benchmark 4.0 and he has a 1080ti and i7 8700k 3.7ghz using 120mm AIO and his max temp was 48c, his score to the benchmark was 4346. I’m gonna test mine on the benchmark and if it isn’t higher than I’m worried
 
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