How to test a potentially failing PSU, and a suitable replacement.

_BirchTree_

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Recently I have been having issues with my PC turning on but no display on the monitor (lights in the case, fans on etc but no display). After looking online a I tried a few fixes such as clearing the CMOS, reseating multiple components and thoroughly cleaning the PC, to no avail. This leads me to believe that the PSU could be failing (I've had suspicions for a while), and was wondering about sound ways of testing whether it is outputting the correct voltage etc before buying a brand new one. Multiple online sources have stated using a PSU tester or using a multimeter, are these good suggestions?

My system is:
GPU: nvidia GeForce GTX 760
CPU: AMD FX(tm)-6300 Six-Core processor
Motherboard: MSI-970A-G46 (MS-7693)
8GB RAM Corsair vengeance
Power supply: Corsair CX500M
Hard drive: Western Digital 1TB WD10EZEX 2014
Network card: Realtek PCle GBE family controller

Help is greatly appreciated.
 
Both are good suggestions. A PSU tester is easier. A multimeter is more versatile. My preference is a multimeter first. Since it has so many uses. PSU testers are nice if you do a lot of PC repair and need a quick specialty tool (pays for itself).

Get a clamp style multimeter. Prices aren't much different from a regular one and it adds to versatility. No need for expensive units if you aren't an electrician who needs the tool everyday.
https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Multimeters-Auto-Ranging-Multimeter-Resistance/dp/B00NWGZ4XC/

If you do want a PSU tester. This is what I use.
https://www.amazon.com/Thermaltake-Automated-Supply-Oversized-Supplies/dp/B005F778JO/

While a multi-meter is always a good tool to have. Just like a full screwdriver set, hammer, plier set, wrenches and sockets are. So, I would buy it in either case. Have you followed the troubleshooting steps. Many won't apply like checking the CPU pins unless you reseated it for some reason.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261145-31-perform-steps-posting-post-boot-video-problems

I'd at least try the system bare bones. CPU, One RAM module at a time and GPU. If you have some old known good GPU to swap out. That would be great. Lights and no POST would make me suspect something else. Really it could be any hardware component failure.

PSU failure is predominantly zero signs of life. You have some signs of life. Sometimes BIOS warnings of severe voltage problems or worse of all burning/smoke/fire.
 

_BirchTree_

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I have followed most of those steps and still no success, nothing shows on screen even without HDD. My motherboard does not have integrated graphics so I cannot test it with another GPU unfortunately, would you know of a good way testing the GPU otherwise? Will be testing a different PSU hopefully soon. There doesn't appear to be an obvious fault.
 


Not without a known working computer to test it in. You need to know if the computer works before you know that the GPU works or not. If you don't, you rule out everything you can. Then either make your best guess or get a cheap test bench computer.

You have power. So, the PSU is likely good. I don't know if you got any of the testers I mentioned. If it passed those it is almost certainly good.

I assume you stripped it down to the most basic. PSU, GPU, CPU (with heatsink) and RAM. Nothing else.
- Do you get any beeps or diagnostic lights?
- Have you tried removing the GPU and use just one RAM module at a time? and tried different slots with each module? Just to test for a POST beep. Any results? Check your motherboard's manual for troubleshooting. There should be some method for diagnostic codes.

If you have more than one RAM module. It is highly unlikely both failed simultaneously without something to have also happened to the motherboard. If no different results with them one at a time in different slots. I'd make the assumption that they work.

This leaves the most likely remaining culprits as the GPU, Motherboard and CPU. CPU failure is almost unheard of outside a motherboard failure. Based on odds I'd rule it out. GPU failure is, in my experience, far more common than motherboard failure.

You can check Goodwill for cheap working computers. Just make sure it has the right slots and can accept a full size GPU and PSU. So, bring measuring tape, a screwdriver and ask if you can open it up. Then you'll have a test bench. If your city allows dumpster diving or landfill scavenging. You can grab some junk computers from an office or at the landfill and put together a working test bench for free. Quite possibly something faster than your old FX CPU.
 

_BirchTree_

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Apologies for not replying sooner. Just bought some internal speakers and tested to see if there were any BIOS beep codes and there were none. Looking around apparently no POST and no beep codes indicates either PSU, CPU, RAM or motherboard is at fault. Would you agree? I might as well go ahead and but a DMM to test the PSU at least. Not really in a position to go out a buy a crap one to test on.
 

_BirchTree_

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Its fixed! After all the stress, I narrowed it down to a motherboard or CPU problem so I decided to take it to a repair shop. They confirmed that my motherboard has basically died, so a new mobo for me!
 

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