[SOLVED] How to test my new pre-build?

Kisuke42

Distinguished
Sep 4, 2013
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Hey folks,

I am planning to buy a new PC which is most likely gonna be a pre-build.
My questions are:

1- It will come with windows pre-installed and probably some additional programs aswell.
Is it a good idea to wipe the hard drive and do a clean fresh windows install? Or should I just uninstall the random added programs?

2- Once the PC is on, how do I test it to make sure no parts are defective? The only thing that comes to my mind is using CPU-z that can show me what parts exactly are in my PC but I am not sure what to do beyond that.
 

Lafong

Respectable
1-
Is it a good idea to wipe the hard drive and do a clean fresh windows install? Or should I just uninstall the random added programs?

2- Once the PC is on, how do I test it to make sure no parts are defective?
Question 1: Doing a clean install on a new prebuilt is certainly an option, but hardly a requirement. I wouldn't worry about uninstallling what you don't want UNLESS you are forced into it by lack of drive space....certainly not immediately.

Another option is to do nothing. Use it as is. A clean install and then installing just what you want is often recommended, but it will take a bunch of hours and you may not notice the difference.

But if are a hobbyist type who likes to fiddle with hardware, go ahead with a clean install.

Question 2; You can use a program like Speccy to identify what's inside. You could use Crystal Disk Info to get specific hard drive info and health. Maybe Crystal Disk Mark to test hard drive speed. Maybe Intel Extreme Testing Utility or Cinebench to put a good load on the CPU to see if temps are acceptable. HWInfo64 is very good to keep track of CPU usage, drive temps, fan speeds, motherboard temps, etc.

I'd immediately try to do all the stuff you normally do with a PC to see if there are any disappointments or peculiarities you don't understand.

Develop plans for backup and maintenance.

Prepare yourself for dealing with Windows Update.
 

Lafong

Respectable
1-
Is it a good idea to wipe the hard drive and do a clean fresh windows install? Or should I just uninstall the random added programs?

2- Once the PC is on, how do I test it to make sure no parts are defective?
Question 1: Doing a clean install on a new prebuilt is certainly an option, but hardly a requirement. I wouldn't worry about uninstallling what you don't want UNLESS you are forced into it by lack of drive space....certainly not immediately.

Another option is to do nothing. Use it as is. A clean install and then installing just what you want is often recommended, but it will take a bunch of hours and you may not notice the difference.

But if are a hobbyist type who likes to fiddle with hardware, go ahead with a clean install.

Question 2; You can use a program like Speccy to identify what's inside. You could use Crystal Disk Info to get specific hard drive info and health. Maybe Crystal Disk Mark to test hard drive speed. Maybe Intel Extreme Testing Utility or Cinebench to put a good load on the CPU to see if temps are acceptable. HWInfo64 is very good to keep track of CPU usage, drive temps, fan speeds, motherboard temps, etc.

I'd immediately try to do all the stuff you normally do with a PC to see if there are any disappointments or peculiarities you don't understand.

Develop plans for backup and maintenance.

Prepare yourself for dealing with Windows Update.
 

Remmik

Distinguished
Oct 12, 2010
8
1
18,515
1
Hey folks,

I am planning to buy a new PC which is most likely gonna be a pre-build.
My questions are:

1- It will come with windows pre-installed and probably some additional programs aswell.
Is it a good idea to wipe the hard drive and do a clean fresh windows install? Or should I just uninstall the random added programs?

2- Once the PC is on, how do I test it to make sure no parts are defective? The only thing that comes to my mind is using CPU-z that can show me what parts exactly are in my PC but I am not sure what to do beyond that.
Most bloatware that comes with pre-builds are not very CPU intensive but they do eat up memory. I’ve had some systems that I leave all the pre installed software and others that I do a clean Windows install. If your system has limited memory, and a high percentage of memory is being used without any major programs running, then a clean install is advised. Either that or install more RAM. Run “Task Manager” that comes with Windows and click on the “More Details” to see all the tasks running, as well as CPU and memory use. As another option, besides clean install, you can disable any and all apps from starting when Windows starts. This can be done in Task Manager as well.
The next thing I do with new systems is install and run 3D Mark through Steam. Now a days it has benchmarks for your hard drive as well CPU. All of these are a good stress test for CPU, memory and hard drives or SSD’s, for new systems. Of course, it will also test out every bit of your motherboard electronics and PSU but won’t give you any detailed metrics on anything except scores for their bench marks. Actually it does have a line graph for load and temps that I rarely look at. For more detailed specs, I install HWinfo (mainly for voltages and temps). That one can be a bit overkill on info so the other one I use for day to day motioning is Argus monitor. Nice time line graphs for temps. It also has fan control if your bios and graphics card allows it.
The last thing I do, if I am not happy with certain temps, is repaste the CPU and have even done it to the GPU. The thermal paste from pre-builds cannot be trusted to be top quality or even installed properly. Even thermal pads are sure to be cheap or middle ground at best and more room for install error.
Thermal pads also “wear out” as they have an oil that helps with the thermal conduction. Through excessive heat this oil can leach out and you will see the chips and board get an oil stain look under and around these pads. Higher quality pads will have this happen less under stress. All this, of course, is more advanced methods but rewarding, even after many years doing this with new (or new to me) systems.
Oh one last bit of advice. Make sure you have a Microsoft email account to log into Windows. Then the setup will ask you if you want to back up your files with their OneDrive cloud service. If you chose yes, not just you documents and pics will be backed up but also your desktop, wallpaper and other personal settings. It’s like smartphones have had for sometime. Where you add or replace a new phone, log into your account and all your personal settings and files just appears on your new device. Same if your computer gets a virus or ransomeware; you can just erase the drive, reload Windows and the cloud service restores everything back to your computer.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
It's often faster and easier to just delete/ignore bloatware. Many prebuilts use custom bios, custom windows installs and what you might consider bloatware is actually software that enables things like rgb control, fan speed settings etc. Most actual bloatware isn't installed programming, it's download links to subscriptions for Antivirus or photoshop etc. That you can ignore or delete as you choose.

It's a pre-built. Shouldn't need to do anything more than plug it in and play. That said, of all the prebuilts I've ever owned, they get full teardown treatment, cleaning, repaste etc. I trust nobody I don't know to build my pc.
 

Nighthawk117

Notable
Sep 27, 2021
880
237
890
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1- It will come with windows pre-installed and probably some additional programs aswell.
Is it a good idea to wipe the hard drive and do a clean fresh windows install? Or should I just uninstall the random added programs?
I don't bother on my machines, the only thing I do is replace the anti virus program with my own if it comes with one. I would just uninstall the applications you don't want if any.

2- Once the PC is on, how do I test it to make sure no parts are defective? The only thing that comes to my mind is using CPU-z that can show me what parts exactly are in my PC but I am not sure what to do beyond that.
Well if there is a problem you will likely know soon enough just by using it. I wouldn't start stress testing it for 24 hours and stuff like that. If it's a gaming PC, then just run a modern game to see if works ok.
 

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