HP Offering Motherboard Fix for 3 Pavillion Desktops

Status
Not open for further replies.

dj1001

Distinguished
Oct 20, 2009
159
0
18,680
0
Maybe if they didn't import thier mobo's from china stacked directly on top of each with nothing but a piece of cardboard in between and the entire bundle piled on a crate and shrink wrapped the failure rates wouldn't be so high.
 

kawininjazx

Distinguished
May 22, 2008
1,372
0
19,460
91
How about the millions of DV series laptops with faulty nvidia graphics chips? I was waiting for the "Motherboard Fix" to be a heatgun to the video chip like those laptops. Don't buy HP crap.
 

waethorn

Distinguished
Sep 29, 2009
300
0
18,780
0
[citation][nom]kawininjazx[/nom]How about the millions of DV series laptops with faulty nvidia graphics chips? I was waiting for the "Motherboard Fix" to be a heatgun to the video chip like those laptops. Don't buy HP crap.[/citation]

It's not just those - the Intel DV2000/6000/9000 series and some of the newer DV6/7, etc. models also had issues. The thermal sensor didn't operate properly so the threshold temperatures for faster fan operation never registered. The board components couldn't handle the extra heat, so the board would literally cook.

Not only that, but I've personally seen DOZENS of AMD Vision laptops in my computer repair shop with the same problems (no POST motherboard fault) as the NVIDIA chipset boards.

The problem is HP. Either they just have bad engineers working for them (unless they contract them out too) or else they aren't paying their OEM's enough money to make quality parts.
 
G

Guest

Guest
This has been known since nov 2011. Its not a blow cap issue. A chipset issue with onboard video etc. And its a foxconn alvorix motherboard
 

alextheblue

Distinguished
Apr 3, 2001
3,078
106
20,970
2
[citation][nom]waethorn[/nom]It's not just those - the Intel DV2000/6000/9000 series and some of the newer DV6/7, etc. models also had issues. The thermal sensor didn't operate properly so the threshold temperatures for faster fan operation never registered. The board components couldn't handle the extra heat, so the board would literally cook.Not only that, but I've personally seen DOZENS of AMD Vision laptops in my computer repair shop with the same problems (no POST motherboard fault) as the NVIDIA chipset boards.The problem is HP. Either they just have bad engineers working for them (unless they contract them out too) or else they aren't paying their OEM's enough money to make quality parts.[/citation]No. Google "bumpgate". The issue was exacerbated by HP's marginal cooling, but it didn't cause it. Running cooler would have delayed problems, even "avoided" them entirely as long as the system wasn't stressed much. But the fault was not exclusively HP's. The operating temps were within Nvidia's tolerances for the MCP mobile parts. I mean it's a laptop, even with better cooling it would run hotter than a desktop at points for power savings (at idle or near-idle, for example) if nothing else. Nvidia's bumps were crap, and couldn't handle the load. High temps just made the failures occur much more rapidly.

Anyway, the whole "let's extend the warranty a year" is such crap. In lightly used "bumpgate-equipped" laptops, users were often unaware of a potential problem until they started acting up (integrated wireless NIC stops working, intermittent display issues or reboots). For a laptop that is rarely stressed (interwebz and email), by the time it dies it may very well be a couple of years old - out of warranty even after warranty extension! They should attempt to contact all owners who registered it and if not repair the system, at least make them aware of it.

Personally if I had a system with known issues that they refused to fix, I'd be really tempted to heat it up and MAKE it fail before the warranty ran out, and send it in for repairs.
 

waethorn

Distinguished
Sep 29, 2009
300
0
18,780
0
[citation][nom]alextheblue[/nom]No. Google "bumpgate". The issue was exacerbated by HP's marginal cooling, but it didn't cause it. Running cooler would have delayed problems, even "avoided" them entirely as long as the system wasn't stressed much. But the fault was not exclusively HP's. The operating temps were within Nvidia's tolerances for the MCP mobile parts. I mean it's a laptop, even with better cooling it would run hotter than a desktop at points for power savings (at idle or near-idle, for example) if nothing else. Nvidia's bumps were crap, and couldn't handle the load. High temps just made the failures occur much more rapidly.Anyway, the whole "let's extend the warranty a year" is such crap. In lightly used "bumpgate-equipped" laptops, users were often unaware of a potential problem until they started acting up (integrated wireless NIC stops working, intermittent display issues or reboots). For a laptop that is rarely stressed (interwebz and email), by the time it dies it may very well be a couple of years old - out of warranty even after warranty extension! They should attempt to contact all owners who registered it and if not repair the system, at least make them aware of it.Personally if I had a system with known issues that they refused to fix, I'd be really tempted to heat it up and MAKE it fail before the warranty ran out, and send it in for repairs.[/citation]

Yes, I know that the NVIDIA problem was a defect in the chipset. HP never had Intel systems with NVIDIA chipsets though - they were Intel chipset. Those systems had a defect of a different cause, but the end result was the same - a dead board.

HP's warranty service never helped though, since most failures didn't happen until after year 1, but how many people buy manufacturers extended warranties? (more people should IMO). HP changed the warranty extension terms 3 times before silently killing it altogether. Also, many models that had the same cause and symptoms were never covered under the warranty extension. On AMD systems with the NVIDIA chipset, one of the most common first symptoms that I saw was the WiFi mPCIe (they all had Broadcom WiFi cards too) slot going dead on the board. Once I saw that, the board would only last a few months longer before dying. I've seem probably 3 dozen systems with the same symptom and ALL of them had the same result - a system that would no longer POST. I'm well experienced with the problem. When a person brings a DVx000 system in, there is so little chance it's still working 100% that I tell them about the problem ahead of time.
 

Akzea

Honorable
Aug 2, 2012
1
0
10,510
0


Four years ago they had the same problem with the s series 3000, 6000 and the tx. They never changed the mainboards neither they made effective the guarantees. the problem was same, the same symptoms: (1) computer powers on with no video, no beeps; (2) computer locks up at the POST screen or reboots; (3) computer constantly reboots, because een that occasion the processor of video nVidia became unstuck.
I don't really believe that HP will fulfill what offer
 
G

Guest

Guest
3?? This bunch of failures has way more than three motherboards to fix. I'll be modest and say $50, 000.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Sadly, this is my 2nd MB issue with my Pavillion, and, my last. My first Pavillion lasted eights months before the MB failed. After I demanded and got a second Pavillion, (maybe I should count my lucky stars) it lasted 11 eleven months before the MB failed. Once I get my laptop back, I will transfer all my data over to a new laptop yet to be purchased. Trust me - I'm through with HP.

Moral of the story ... fool me once, shame on you ... fool me twice, shame on me.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS