Question I can't boot Windows after changing CPU, MOBO, RAM

Dec 8, 2022
5
0
10
0
I changed PC components today for new ones. At first I couldn't get the image on the monitor at all, but somehow I managed it eventually. I updated the BIOS from version 1.11 to 4.01. Now the problem is that I cannot boot my Windows 10 Pro which was on M.2 SSD Samsung 970 Evo 1TB. In the bios, the drives and the SSD are visible, but not in the boot loader list.

Components:
Intel Core i5-13600K / PLN 1689
ASRock Z790 PRO RS DDR5 LGA1700 / PLN 1160
Kingston FURY 32GB


I tried:
-flash pendrive and copy windows installer to it. Repair didn't work and some commands were denied access through CMD. Also:
--- bootrec /FixMbr, bootrec /FixBoot, bootrec /ScanOs, bootrec /RebuildBcd, assign letter=x (to the original ones because they changed).
-through AOMEI Partition Assistant 9.6.0 on a flash drive, enter CMD and try:
--- https://www.digitalcitizen.life/command-prompt-fix-issues-your-boot-records/
--- https://neosmart.net/wiki/fix-mbr/?fbclid=IwAR2pGSuO-465FFv7zW9cNlgnldPnVgpa18E4QLaPVNaEgCuA8gVvtyYDrvQ#Fix_the_MBR_in_Windows_10
--- https://neosmart.net/wiki/fix-mbr/
--- convert MBR partition to GPT.
-auto fix by third party programs, but three quarters of them require a premium version (Windows Boot Genius).
-to install Windows from a pendrive, but it turns out that the option to save files and apps is impossible (this message pops up) and the only option left is a clean install. y.
-to use Ultimate Boot CD, it's visible at bootloader list but it doesn't want to turn on, maybe because it's UEFI and it doesn't seem to support it (even though I have Secure Boot option disabled).
-diskpart:



I'm running out of ideas... What should I do to make this system finally appear on the motherboard? Anyone got any ideas?
 
Last edited:
Dec 8, 2022
5
0
10
0
"saving files" should have been done before embarking on this upgrade path.

With a new motherboard, a fresh OS install is always recommended, usually required.
Here, required.
I did partition backup but it won't change anything, because the applications will have to be reinstalled anyway if I reinstall the system.
 
Dec 8, 2022
5
0
10
0
The thread can be closed.
Problem has been solved.


Gentlemens, I'm getting old, but I'm not that old. Reinstalling the system is for those who do not know OS at all and it is following the simplest line of solution. The system is like a collection of gears. There is no such thing as having to reinstall it for no reason. It's not a car air freshener. A well-maintained system, regularly inspected system will work 100% as it did on its first day of operation. It's good that I was constipated and fought to the end, because it was repaired.

Moving on to the solution, I wiil leave it in short from what I remember:

After changing the components, there is no compatibility with the boot software. This necessitates redefining the partitions and distributing the system in their record. Therefore, you need to more or less remember the size of the partitions and what was on them. In my case, the motherboard did not detect the system in the bootloder list, but saw the drive itself as connected.

1. We need access to CMD. So the easiest way is to download the Media Creation Tool and flash it on a pendrive. Similarly, you can, for example, use other solutions such as AOMEI Partition Assistant 9.6.0 on a flash drive, there we also have access to CMD.

2. Once we get to the console, a number of commands await us.

--> diskpart (first we enter DiskPart to check the distribution on disks)

--> list volume (we check what letters are assigned to the partition)

We remember what letters the partitions had. Now we have to give them the original as they were before the changes. So if we notice that our 1TB SSD is entered as D and it was the system partition C, then we need to replace it. For this purpose, we give the current partition C any other unoccupied letter, and then the original one need to be restored to its rightful place. We do this with all partitions, except the so-called bootable disk (usually has several hundred MB), which we can call Z. If we do not remember which disk is which, we can exit diskpart and go with the usual commands C:, dir, etc. to find what is inside of them.

--> select volume YOURLETTER (select a given partition)

--> detail disk (to make sure what are the parameters of the partition)

--> assign letter=YOURLETTER (we assign a new letter)

--> exit (close diskpart)

Now we are restoring our boot. Watch out for spaces, because for me one unnoticed typo extended the whole process by two hours. Let's go with standard commands. They should always be followed by a successful repair message. If access is denied, I recommend using CMD through an external program (it helped me once).

--> bootrec /fixmbr

--> bootrec /fixboot

--> bootrec.exe /rebuildbcd

--> bootrec /ScanOS

The most important part, we add the boot on the system partition. The meanings of all elements are in the console, I recommend reading them, because sometimes you can come up with something interesting in relation to the situation.

--> bcdboot C:\Windows /s Z: /f UEFI

We should get a message that the boot was created successfully. We turn off the computer. And now the magic point, I don't know if it's because I didn't have a dedicated graphics card plugged in before replacing the components, or just ASRock has such a strange boot, but please keep one thing in mind. The computer will turn off. We click the start button and in my case there was no image, not even a BIOS, nothing at all. I had this before too and then I restarted PC, changed HDMI ports, because I thought something was not working. Well, no... If you have signal lamps in your computer case, they will help a lot, because you can see on one of them whether the computer is "processing". Therefore, you should leave PC even for an hour. Probably then there is an automatic repair of the system, which for some strange reason cannot be seen (maybe I have such a stupid motherboard, I don't know). But after 15 minutes in my case.... magic happens! The monitor wakes up and the Windows 10 Pro account login screen appears.

PS: Please remember to check the Z partition with our boot at the very beginning if it is FAT32. If not, it should be formatted, otherwise with NTFS, the system may cause errors, e.g. during Windows Update. The following commands can also help here: delete volume override, create partition efi size=500, format quick fs=fat32.
 
Last edited:

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
When I move, I don't take any garbage left over into the new place.

I'm not sure about the desperation to avoid best practices and use a janky method instead of something simple and straightforward. And no, Windows is specifically not designed to be modular in this manner unless you have a specific Windows-to-Go install. Windows is merely designed to try to be forgiving for people who cut corners.

You spent far more time messing around here with a solution that may not even look like one two days, weeks, or months down the road, than it would take to wipe-and-reinstall assuming even the most rudimentary organization.
 
Last edited:
Reinstalling the system is for those who do not know OS at all
100% false.

A quick Google will bring anyone to the solution detailed in your essay. And you did ALL that to still have old drivers on the system and invalid registry entries, waste of time. Good for you that you think it's fixed, it may even stay that way for a while. But install the wrong thing, which conflicts with the old crud I mentioned above and you'll be singing a different song.

Any tech worth his or her salt knows full well that what you've done is a sticking plaster, a blag, a fudge.

But crack on, you clearly know more than myself about operating systems.
 
Dec 8, 2022
5
0
10
0
Your whole #2 above is simply changing drive letters around, and then messing around with the boot partition.

If you think that was the total "fix"...good luck with that.
Thanks, but everything working excellent, even few hours ago I upgraded it to Windows 11.
I'll enjoy this wine for myself while you can go cry and reinstall your system every year.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
161,292
13,373
176,090
24,451
Thanks, but everything working excellent, even few hours ago I upgraded it to Windows 11.
I'll enjoy this wine for myself while you can go cry and reinstall your system every year.
No, I don't reinstall my system every year.

Generally, only during a major hardware change.

Great if it works for you on this system.
But that is not always the outcome.
 
May 25, 2022
55
10
35
0
The thread can be closed.
Problem has been solved.


Gentlemens, I'm getting old, but I'm not that old. Reinstalling the system is for those who do not know OS at all and it is following the simplest line of solution. The system is like a collection of gears. There is no such thing as having to reinstall it for no reason. It's not a car air freshener. A well-maintained system, regularly inspected system will work 100% as it did on its first day of operation. It's good that I was constipated and fought to the end, because it was repaired.

Moving on to the solution, I wiil leave it in short from what I remember:

After changing the components, there is no compatibility with the boot software. This necessitates redefining the partitions and distributing the system in their record. Therefore, you need to more or less remember the size of the partitions and what was on them. In my case, the motherboard did not detect the system in the bootloder list, but saw the drive itself as connected.

1. We need access to CMD. So the easiest way is to download the Media Creation Tool and flash it on a pendrive. Similarly, you can, for example, use other solutions such as AOMEI Partition Assistant 9.6.0 on a flash drive, there we also have access to CMD.

2. Once we get to the console, a number of commands await us.

--> diskpart (first we enter DiskPart to check the distribution on disks)

--> list volume (we check what letters are assigned to the partition)

We remember what letters the partitions had. Now we have to give them the original as they were before the changes. So if we notice that our 1TB SSD is entered as D and it was the system partition C, then we need to replace it. For this purpose, we give the current partition C any other unoccupied letter, and then the original one need to be restored to its rightful place. We do this with all partitions, except the so-called bootable disk (usually has several hundred MB), which we can call Z. If we do not remember which disk is which, we can exit diskpart and go with the usual commands C:, dir, etc. to find what is inside of them.

--> select volume YOURLETTER (select a given partition)

--> detail disk (to make sure what are the parameters of the partition)

--> assign letter=YOURLETTER (we assign a new letter)

--> exit (close diskpart)

Now we are restoring our boot. Watch out for spaces, because for me one unnoticed typo extended the whole process by two hours. Let's go with standard commands. They should always be followed by a successful repair message. If access is denied, I recommend using CMD through an external program (it helped me once).

--> bootrec /fixmbr

--> bootrec /fixboot

--> bootrec.exe /rebuildbcd

--> bootrec /ScanOS

The most important part, we add the boot on the system partition. The meanings of all elements are in the console, I recommend reading them, because sometimes you can come up with something interesting in relation to the situation.

--> bcdboot C:\Windows /s Z: /f UEFI

We should get a message that the boot was created successfully. We turn off the computer. And now the magic point, I don't know if it's because I didn't have a dedicated graphics card plugged in before replacing the components, or just ASRock has such a strange boot, but please keep one thing in mind. The computer will turn off. We click the start button and in my case there was no image, not even a BIOS, nothing at all. I had this before too and then I restarted PC, changed HDMI ports, because I thought something was not working. Well, no... If you have signal lamps in your computer case, they will help a lot, because you can see on one of them whether the computer is "processing". Therefore, you should leave PC even for an hour. Probably then there is an automatic repair of the system, which for some strange reason cannot be seen (maybe I have such a stupid motherboard, I don't know). But after 15 minutes in my case.... magic happens! The monitor wakes up and the Windows 10 Pro account login screen appears.

PS: Please remember to check the Z partition with our boot at the very beginning if it is FAT32. If not, it should be formatted, otherwise with NTFS, the system may cause errors, e.g. during Windows Update. The following commands can also help here: delete volume override, create partition efi size=500, format quick fs=fat32.
I'm curious, how long did this take you?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
161,292
13,373
176,090
24,451
I'm curious, how long did this take you?
Changing the drive letters around and "fixing" the boot partition should only take a few minutes.

However, that is rarely the "fix" for a non bootable system after changing the motherboard.

A Windows install is not modular to be moved across hardware changes without problems.

Sometimes it does work.
Often, it fails.
Or, it sort of mostly works, but you're chasing other issues for weeks/months.

Please do not take the above posters solution as the "always solution".
 
May 25, 2022
55
10
35
0
Changing the drive letters around and "fixing" the boot partition should only take a few minutes.

However, that is rarely the "fix" for a non bootable system after changing the motherboard.

A Windows install is not modular to be moved across hardware changes without problems.

Sometimes it does work.
Often, it fails.
Or, it sort of mostly works, but you're chasing other issues for weeks/months.

Please do not take the above posters solution as the "always solution".
Thanks, but that wasn't why I asked the question.
 
May 25, 2022
55
10
35
0
And I answered:
"should only take a few minutes. "
Thanks for telling me how long it would take you to accomplish it, not that I was asking. I'll spell it out for you. I know how long it takes. I wanted to hear from the original poster how long he spent working on a kludgy workaround rather than just doing a clean install. That's all.
 
Dec 8, 2022
5
0
10
0
Thanks for telling me how long it would take you to accomplish it, not that I was asking. I'll spell it out for you. I know how long it takes. I wanted to hear from the original poster how long he spent working on a kludgy workaround rather than just doing a clean install. That's all.
It took me all day to learn how to do it. Once I knew it and set it up, it was a maximum of 10 minutes from turning on the PC to going to CMD and typing.

But recovering some scripts, sorting folders and other applications stored in the system would take me several days if I cleanly installed it.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS