Question I can't enable port forwarding

kanishknishar

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This is my PC: bit.do/kanishkpc

I have read several guides trying to enable forwarding to Port No. 52390 on my TP Link AC1200. First you need to set a static IP by copying the IPv4 Address, Subnet Mask, Default Gateway and DNS server 1 and 2. Problem was that my default gateway and DNS server was 192.168.0.1. I then went to my router setting and found 2 DNS servers listed. With the static IP set with the 2 DNS servers from my router, I went to Virtual Servers and added a DNS port with internal and external port of 52390 with my internal IP being what I found earlier. This did not work.

I changed my IP address by changing the last 10 digits and tried again to no avail.

There's more: The IP and Default Gateway on my router are different than what was shown on cmd.

Also I am confused: Is what I write on IPv4 configuration, my external IP, what IP is tested by port forwarding site and what I type on virtual servers supposed to be the same IP? The IP on port forwarding site is different.

Images: View: https://imgur.com/a/5dORC19
 
If this middle image is from your router you will never get port forwarding to work.

Since the default gateway is a private ip (ie a 10.x.x.x) it means the ip you have hidden also is private. Also you comment that the ip the port forwarding site has is different also leads me to believe you do not have a public ip assigned to your router.

There likely is a NAT router in the ISP network and you are sharing the public ip with other users. A port forward rule would need to go into that router which you can not do.

You pretty much can't do it unless your ISP can assign you a public ip. They may or may not offer this service and some charge extra for it.
 

kanishknishar

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If this middle image is from your router you will never get port forwarding to work.

Since the default gateway is a private ip (ie a 10.x.x.x) it means the ip you have hidden also is private. Also you comment that the ip the port forwarding site has is different also leads me to believe you do not have a public ip assigned to your router.

There likely is a NAT router in the ISP network and you are sharing the public ip with other users. A port forward rule would need to go into that router which you can not do.

You pretty much can't do it unless your ISP can assign you a public ip. They may or may not offer this service and some charge extra for it.
If I got a static IP, I would only need to go to virtual server and copy my IP and enter the port number?
 

kanishknishar

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Generally you do not have to configure the router any different. You always put in the internal IP. You do not need a "static" you just need a public. Static just means you don't have to use tools like dyndns
To get a public IP, I would need to contact my ISP? What type of IP do I currently use?
 

kanishknishar

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Generally you do not have to configure the router any different. You always put in the internal IP. You do not need a "static" you just need a public. Static just means you don't have to use tools like dyndns
I called the engineer. He said public IPs are shared - which is what I have. What should I do?
 

Graham Dancy

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Yeah, 10.x.x.x is a private IP range and your ISP, in thier infinite wisdom, is being cheap and only running a few public IP's with customers like yourself sitting behind a NAT (like you would with your home network, just on a bigger scale).

There might be a way around this by setting up a VPN to a network with a public IP and port forwarding from there but it'll be high latency and likely more hassle than its worth (depends on what you are wanting it for tbh). Changing ISP's to one that offers a public IP as standard is the simplest solution from a technical standpoint but be aware that unless your contract is up they will probably try to screw you with small-print-fu.
 

kanishknishar

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Yeah, 10.x.x.x is a private IP range and your ISP, in thier infinite wisdom, is being cheap and only running a few public IP's with customers like yourself sitting behind a NAT (like you would with your home network, just on a bigger scale).

There might be a way around this by setting up a VPN to a network with a public IP and port forwarding from there but it'll be high latency and likely more hassle than its worth (depends on what you are wanting it for tbh). Changing ISP's to one that offers a public IP as standard is the simplest solution from a technical standpoint but be aware that unless your contract is up they will probably try to screw you with small-print-fu.
Alright. What should I ask? He's saying that what I have currently is public IP. If it's not, what am I running currently? Also, isn't static IP different from a public IP?
 
Static means the IP never changes it can be private or public. A public ip means it is visible on the internet. Although a public IP that is not static can change it does not change very often so is fine for the use you want.

Them saying that you have a public IP is being deceptive or more likely be simple minded. Most people use the word to mean it is assigned to your router for your exclusive use not shared with other users

You need at the very minimum a public ip that is for your exclusive use. Maybe it only is yours for 1 day and then it changes to a different ip but that new ip would be your exclusively for that time. A static public ip would always be the same no matter if it was 1 day or 1 year. Most times even if the IP is not static it does not change unless for example you turn your router off for a long period of time.
 

kanishknishar

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Static means the IP never changes it can be private or public. A public ip means it is visible on the internet. Although a public IP that is not static can change it does not change very often so is fine for the use you want.

Them saying that you have a public IP is being deceptive or more likely be simple minded. Most people use the word to mean it is assigned to your router for your exclusive use not shared with other users

You need at the very minimum a public ip that is for your exclusive use. Maybe it only is yours for 1 day and then it changes to a different ip but that new ip would be your exclusively for that time. A static public ip would always be the same no matter if it was 1 day or 1 year. Most times even if the IP is not static it does not change unless for example you turn your router off for a long period of time.
He told me there were two types of IP. One of them was server IP. That is what is shown on the router?

I asked him if my static IP would be shared and he said that that IP would be mine alone. Does that change things?
 

Graham Dancy

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Kinda. There is no such thing as a 'server' IP in the world of networking, thats just a first line moron trying to sound clever, you have public IP's which are visible from anywhere on the planet, and private IP's which are only visible on a LAN. Your 10.100. whatever is a private IP indicating your ISP is running a NAT, you can check this by googling 'whats my IP' and comparing it to the external interface on the router. If they match you have a routable public IP (dynamic means it changes when your router reboots, static means you always get the same one, even if its still being assigned by some manner of DHCP) if they dont then you dont have a routable public IP and you wont be able to direct traffic to a host on your own household LAN from the internet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reserved_IP_addresses - Proof!
 

Graham Dancy

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Honestly dude, looking at those images, you are on possibly one of the cheapest of the cheap ISP's going. What they are doing is basically the same as you paying for a connection and running some wires to your neighbours, selling them 'internet' and calling yourself an ISP. They aren't even running thier own DNS, those ones belong to google!

Run far, run fast.
 

kanishknishar

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Honestly dude, looking at those images, you are on possibly one of the cheapest of the cheap ISP's going. What they are doing is basically the same as you paying for a connection and running some wires to your neighbours, selling them 'internet' and calling yourself an ISP. They aren't even running thier own DNS, those ones belong to google!

Run far, run fast.
They provide unmatched speeds in my area. I think they are the only FTTH in my area. Also they are cheap. I purchased a static IP and now my port is open. So everything's fine.
 

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