[SOLVED] I can't reach my own static IP address

Emsanator

Prominent
Dec 28, 2020
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Hello,

I purchased a static IP for a server I run at my home. I can access it outside the home, but I cannot reach my server with my static IP address when connected to the home network. Just work local IP.. What could be the reason for this?

Thank you.
 
Last edited:
Some routers it will work and some it will not. It is kinda silly to do it with the public IP. The traffic must go from your pc out the wan interface and have the source IP translated to the public IP. Then the router must send the traffic back in translating the destination IP to the internal service IP.
When the traffic goes back to the router all this must be reversed. You are in effect using the same public IP for the source and destination IP at the same time. It makes your brain hurt to think about this.

The router either supports it or it does not. It is called hairpin nat. Now in some cases a router is stupid and will send the traffic to the ISP without checking the destination address is actually its IP. In those cases most ISP will just discard this to prevent data loops but some will send it back. Again if the ISP does this it is a very strange and confusing path for the data to take.
 

Emsanator

Prominent
Dec 28, 2020
10
0
510
0
That's normal. That is, how it's supposed to work.
Your purchased static IP address is for your router. This address is accessible from outside only.

From inside your local network you have to use local IP address for your server.
I just moved into my current house. I was able to connect from my previous home and even gain access, including the domain name.
Thus, I was hosting several web pages from my home server.

Unfortunately, I can't do this with my home internet connection. Is it possible that it's from the ISP?
 
Some routers it will work and some it will not. It is kinda silly to do it with the public IP. The traffic must go from your pc out the wan interface and have the source IP translated to the public IP. Then the router must send the traffic back in translating the destination IP to the internal service IP.
When the traffic goes back to the router all this must be reversed. You are in effect using the same public IP for the source and destination IP at the same time. It makes your brain hurt to think about this.

The router either supports it or it does not. It is called hairpin nat. Now in some cases a router is stupid and will send the traffic to the ISP without checking the destination address is actually its IP. In those cases most ISP will just discard this to prevent data loops but some will send it back. Again if the ISP does this it is a very strange and confusing path for the data to take.
 

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