[SOLVED] I can't switch from dGPU to iGPU ?

May 4, 2022
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Actually the problem is interesting. Initially, the computer did not have a video card, and when I inserted it, the computer started up only with the iGPU and the dGPU did not work. However, after I reset the bios, it worked.

But the thing is, only dGPU is working now. The iGPU only works if the graphics card is removed.

I need to start a computer with an iGPU without removing the video card. I don't know what settings were in the BIOS before I reset it. If Init Display First set Onboard in the BIOS, the computer starts with dGPU anyway. I don't know why it doesn't work.

So why is Init Display First not doing anything? And why before I reset the bios, it started with priority on the iGPU?
I think the problem is in the bios settings, but I do not understand where exactly.

Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-A75M-S2V
Bios version: Award Software International, Inc. F1, 15/06/2011
CPU: a8-3850
iGPU: Radeon 6550HD
dGPU: GeForce GTS450
PSU: Aerocool Vx-400
 
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I need this to solve a problem with another computer, where the video card refuses to start, and there is also an iGPU there

Motherboard: Asrock A320M-HDV R4.0
Bios version: American Megatrends Inc. P3.70
CPU: AMD Athlon 200GE
iGPU: Vega 3
dGPU: GeForce GTS450
PSU: Aerocool Vx-400

The video card did not work in both computers, but when I reset the bios on the first one, it worked. The second one doesn't work like that. I want to understand why it worked on the first one, but it doesn't work on the second one

I insert the VGA cable if necessary. If I want to run a computer with an iGPU, then in the motherboard, if with a dGPU, then in the video card. But if the graphics card is connected and the cable is in the motherboard, then the monitor will not turn on because the iGPU is turned off. The computer does not want to work simultaneously with iGPU and dGPU


I want to use dGPU as the main one, but for this I need to switch to it. But whatever I do in the bios, it doesn't work. I thought that if I figured out how to switch to iGPU, I could switch to dGPU
Last question: which OS? Are they the same on both computers?

Last I checked windows 10 and 11 required a dx 12 complaint card. A number of generic wrappers have been written by Microsoft so that older dx11 cards can at least meet the dx12 standard. But not all cards. I doubt a card as old as the gts450 is supported.

That said maybe I can give you a few clues as to other potential issues

When the BIOS goes through the initialization process it often has to check to see if there's input (keyboard) and display output. So it has to initialize various parts of the system in steps. If it encounters an error it will throw a code. Some fatal,some not. If there are multiple GPUs the BIOS has to initialize them one at a time. If the first throws a critical error it kills everything. This is why there's an option in bios as to which GPU (igpu/dgpu) to initialize first. Once hardware initialization is complete the boot loader takes hold. It then become the OS's responsibility to choose which GPU to use. You can sometimes force a piece of hardware to be ignored through registry hacks. But it's not something I recommend unless you are comfortable working in registry entries and lots of them. You have to be able to identify devices based on device ids.
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Welcome to the forums, newcomer!

Are you able to get into BIOS for your motherboard? While here, please check and see what your BIOS version is at the time of writing. To add, you forgot to mention the make and model of your PSU and it's age. Furthermore, did you wipe your platform off of any prior GPU drivers prior to dropping the discrete GPU into your build?
 
May 4, 2022
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Are you able to get into BIOS for your motherboard? While here, please check and see what your BIOS version is at the time of writing.
Bios version: Award Software International, Inc. F1, 15/06/2011
To add, you forgot to mention the make and model of your PSU and it's age.
PSU: Aerocool Vx-400
I don't know the exact age, just over 3 years old.
Furthermore, did you wipe your platform off of any prior GPU drivers prior to dropping the discrete GPU into your build?
Yes, I uninstalled the drivers using DDU (Display Driver Uninstaller)
 

DRagor

Illustrious
I need to start a computer with an iGPU without removing the video card. I don't know what settings were in the BIOS before I reset it. If Init Display First set Onboard in the BIOS, the computer starts with dGPU anyway. I don't know why it doesn't work.
The only thing I found that can help you is setting Init Display First to Onboard AND MB Intelligent Tweaker>IGX Configuration> UMA Frame Buffer size to 512 or 1024. If that does not work then I don't know if anything else would.
 
May 4, 2022
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The only thing I found that can help you is setting Init Display First to Onboard AND MB Intelligent Tweaker>IGX Configuration> UMA Frame Buffer size to 512 or 1024.
The IGX Configuration option only appears when the computer starts up with an iGPU. I took out the video card and set UMA Frame Buffer size to 1024mb and Init Display First to Onboard. The value of allocated memory for iGPU changed, but when I re-inserted the video card, the computer started with dGPU and the IGX Configuration option, of course, disappeared
If that does not work then I don't know if anything else would.
I will try to understand why it worked before resetting the bios. Thanks anyway for your help
 
I need to start a computer with an iGPU without removing the video card.
Why do you need to start the computer with the iGPU/APU? That's the first question. And where are your video cables connected? The motherboard or the dGPU card?

The UMA is the unified memory architecture. That's just how much you want to allocate to the GPU that's system memory for buffer use. It has zip to do with initialization, and will only benefit you if you are invoking moderate textures games.
 
May 4, 2022
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Why do you need to start the computer with the iGPU/APU? That's the first question.
I need this to solve a problem with another computer, where the video card refuses to start, and there is also an iGPU there

Motherboard: Asrock A320M-HDV R4.0
Bios version: American Megatrends Inc. P3.70
CPU: AMD Athlon 200GE
iGPU: Vega 3
dGPU: GeForce GTS450
PSU: Aerocool Vx-400

The video card did not work in both computers, but when I reset the bios on the first one, it worked. The second one doesn't work like that. I want to understand why it worked on the first one, but it doesn't work on the second one
And where are your video cables connected? The motherboard or the dGPU card?
I insert the VGA cable if necessary. If I want to run a computer with an iGPU, then in the motherboard, if with a dGPU, then in the video card. But if the graphics card is connected and the cable is in the motherboard, then the monitor will not turn on because the iGPU is turned off. The computer does not want to work simultaneously with iGPU and dGPU

The UMA is the unified memory architecture. That's just how much you want to allocate to the GPU that's system memory for buffer use. It has zip to do with initialization, and will only benefit you if you are invoking moderate textures games.
I want to use dGPU as the main one, but for this I need to switch to it. But whatever I do in the bios, it doesn't work. I thought that if I figured out how to switch to iGPU, I could switch to dGPU
 
I need this to solve a problem with another computer, where the video card refuses to start, and there is also an iGPU there

Motherboard: Asrock A320M-HDV R4.0
Bios version: American Megatrends Inc. P3.70
CPU: AMD Athlon 200GE
iGPU: Vega 3
dGPU: GeForce GTS450
PSU: Aerocool Vx-400

The video card did not work in both computers, but when I reset the bios on the first one, it worked. The second one doesn't work like that. I want to understand why it worked on the first one, but it doesn't work on the second one

I insert the VGA cable if necessary. If I want to run a computer with an iGPU, then in the motherboard, if with a dGPU, then in the video card. But if the graphics card is connected and the cable is in the motherboard, then the monitor will not turn on because the iGPU is turned off. The computer does not want to work simultaneously with iGPU and dGPU


I want to use dGPU as the main one, but for this I need to switch to it. But whatever I do in the bios, it doesn't work. I thought that if I figured out how to switch to iGPU, I could switch to dGPU
Last question: which OS? Are they the same on both computers?

Last I checked windows 10 and 11 required a dx 12 complaint card. A number of generic wrappers have been written by Microsoft so that older dx11 cards can at least meet the dx12 standard. But not all cards. I doubt a card as old as the gts450 is supported.

That said maybe I can give you a few clues as to other potential issues

When the BIOS goes through the initialization process it often has to check to see if there's input (keyboard) and display output. So it has to initialize various parts of the system in steps. If it encounters an error it will throw a code. Some fatal,some not. If there are multiple GPUs the BIOS has to initialize them one at a time. If the first throws a critical error it kills everything. This is why there's an option in bios as to which GPU (igpu/dgpu) to initialize first. Once hardware initialization is complete the boot loader takes hold. It then become the OS's responsibility to choose which GPU to use. You can sometimes force a piece of hardware to be ignored through registry hacks. But it's not something I recommend unless you are comfortable working in registry entries and lots of them. You have to be able to identify devices based on device ids.
 
May 4, 2022
5
0
10
0
Last question: which OS? Are they the same on both computers?
I have windows 7 installed on the first computer, and windows 10 on the second.
Last I checked windows 10 and 11 required a dx 12 complaint card. A number of generic wrappers have been written by Microsoft so that older dx11 cards can at least meet the dx12 standard. But not all cards. I doubt a card as old as the gts450 is supported.
Now that you mentioned this, I decided to check what OS the video card supports and found that it supports DirectX 11 and does not support Windows 10, but the Nvidia website has drivers for Windows 10 64 bit for GTS 450. I will try to install Windows 10 on the first computer and see if the video card can start on it.
 

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