Question I cleaned my CPU fans and it improved CPU speed, but now my CPU heats up a lot quicker

Dec 4, 2021
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For weeks now I have been having problems with bottlenecking due to my CPU speed dropping from 3.5 GHz on idle to 0.8 GHz when playing games like Fortnite or GTA, thus causing major frame stutters and drops. I went online and found that when CPU reaches a certain temperature it begins to throttle; so I decided to remove my CPU fan and clean out all the dust. I put it back and got everything sorted and I saw a major improvement in my overall CPU speed (now running at 3-3.7 GHz). BUT, now my CPU is having serious temperature problems; now when I run any game my CPU temperature instantly clocks up to 100 degrees (Celsius) and stays there until I either close the game or it crashes.

Can anyone explain why this is happening? It makes no sense to me how cleaning the fan has improved CPU speed, but now my CPU overheats quicker?

CPU: intel i5-4590
GPU: GeForce GTX 1650
RAM: 16GB (dunno if that helps)
 
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4745454b

Titan
Moderator
What cooler are you using?

It shouldn't go up to 100C and stay there until it crashes. It sounds like the thermal limit was changed. You need to go into the bios and load defaults, or manually change the setting for CPU temp. 100C is much too high. Personally, I don't let my CPU get above 70C. I think I have my limits set for 75C or 80C.

The fact that your CPU hits 100C means you haven't fixed the heat issue. Setting the limit to 80C means you'll hit that shut down temp sooner. Why is your CPU getting so hot? If you removed the sink and put it back on I'm guessing you didn't apply the TIM correctly. Or at all. You also might not have tightened things all the way. Or plugged the fan in. Take a look at your heatsink setup and make sure it's working correctly.
 

Lafong

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Have you verified with your actual eyeballs that all internal fans (CPU, case, video card) are in fact spinning as expected? And in the expected direction?

Have you verified these temps with at least 2 different temperature monitoring applications?

It is at least passing strange that you "saw a major improvement in overall CPU speed" simply because you cleaned dust from a CPU fan. Is this a laptop?
 
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Dec 4, 2021
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What cooler are you using?

It shouldn't go up to 100C and stay there until it crashes. It sounds like the thermal limit was changed. You need to go into the bios and load defaults, or manually change the setting for CPU temp. 100C is much too high. Personally, I don't let my CPU get above 70C. I think I have my limits set for 75C or 80C.

The fact that your CPU hits 100C means you haven't fixed the heat issue. Setting the limit to 80C means you'll hit that shut down temp sooner. Why is your CPU getting so hot? If you removed the sink and put it back on I'm guessing you didn't apply the TIM correctly. Or at all. You also might not have tightened things all the way. Or plugged the fan in. Take a look at your heatsink setup and make sure it's working correctly.
Just the stock original intel CPU fan it came with. I have also not applied any new thermal paste so that could be causing the problem, but I wouldn't have thought it would be that big of a deal.

The fan is stuck on tight and doesn't budge so I'd assume that it's on correctly.

And I haven't changed the CPU temperature setting, I only changed the fan speed to full and PWM to 2.50, hoping it would improve the cooling, but it didn't...
 
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Dec 4, 2021
14
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Have you verified with your actual eyeballs that all internal fans (CPU, case, video card) are in fact spinning as expected? And in the expected direction?

Have you verified these temps with at least 2 different temperature monitoring applications?

It is at least passing strange that you "saw a major improvement in overall CPU speed" simply because you cleaned dust from a CPU fan. Is this a laptop?
I've obviously checked that the fans are spinning, I'm not that dumb... Although I haven't properly looked to see if they're spinning the right way, don't know why they'd change directions or what direction they're supposed to be going.

And I've been using MSI Afterburner to check my CPU temp, but I've also changed the BIOS settings so that my computer makes a buzzing sound when the CPU has reached a high temp (which it buzzes A LOT). The buzz sound comes on when the MSI Afterburner reaches 98-100C, so I'd assume it is fairly accurate.

Btw, I'm using a PC, no laptop. And I don't know if this extra info helps, but when I'm playing games, even if my CPU usage is only around 50%, the temperature does not move from 100C.
 

Lafong

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Constant temperature warnings.

"Temperature does not move from 100C".

On a PC, not a laptop.

You have obvious cooling issues. If temps are in fact 100, I'd expect your CPU is throttling....as it should.

You need to get to the bottom of this.

Could be poorly mounted cooler. Maybe dislodged.

I'm assuming high temps are true, not simply measuring errors.

In a typical situation, all case fans and the cpu fan should push air toward the back of the case where you hopefully have an exhaust fan, also blowing out.
 
Dec 4, 2021
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That is a major problem.

That indicates the CPU is throttling and holding at that temp.

Why? Whatever cooler you have on there is not installed properly.
I have the basic original intel fan installed. I think it's on properly, it doesn't budge when I try to move it around?

I also haven't reapplied any new thermal paste after removing the fan (I will be getting some tomorrow) but I didn't think it would cause any serious problems?

I wasn't actually paying much attention to the CPU temp before I cleaned the fan, but I assume it wasn't as hot because it never crashed any of my games. But if it weren't as hot then why did my CPU throttle more, that I do not understand, maybe I'm missing something.
 

Lafong

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Did you remove the cooler when you "cleaned the fan"?

If you did in fact remove the cooler, then presumably you did not re-attach it properly.

If you did NOT remove the cooler, it may still have become dislodged when you "cleaned the fan".

I wouldn't expect that a typical fan cleaning would involve thermal paste at all.......................unless you also removed the cooler.

The standard Intel cooler mounting mechanism was a hopeless mess the last time I fiddled with it, which has been close to 10 years. It isn't easy to use, but it is easy to mistakenly think it is properly attached.
 

USAFRet

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I have the basic original intel fan installed. I think it's on properly, it doesn't budge when I try to move it around?

I also haven't reapplied any new thermal paste after removing the fan (I will be getting some tomorrow) but I didn't think it would cause any serious problems?

I wasn't actually paying much attention to the CPU temp before I cleaned the fan, but I assume it wasn't as hot because it never crashed any of my games. But if it weren't as hot then why did my CPU throttle more, that I do not understand, maybe I'm missing something.
Assuming it has 4 hold down screws, one on each corner...having just one of those not fully tightened is enough to cause ineffective contact, and the CPU to rise to 100C.
Once the CPU is at 100C, it WILL reduce its performance to keep itself from melting into a pile of goo.

You'll need to take it off, clean and replace the thermal paste, and install it correctly.
 

geofelt

Titan
When you say you removed the fan, do you mean you removed the cooler(some equate fan to cooler)?

Whenever you remove a cooler, the old paste must be cleaned off and new applied.
That is likely the source of your problem.

What is the make/model of your case and fan arrangement?
Any cooler needs a good source of fresh air to let it do it's job.
Ditto for the graphics card.
Two 120mm front intakes should be minimum.

Here is my stock text on how to mount the stock intel pushpin cooler.
----------------how to mount the stock Intel cooler--------------

The stock Intel cooler can be tricky to install.
A poor installation will result in higher cpu temperatures.
If properly mounted, you should expect temperatures at idle to be 10-15c. over ambient.

To mount the Intel stock cooler properly, place the motherboard on top of the foam or cardboard backing that was packed with the motherboard.
The stock cooler will come with paste pre applied, it looks like three grey strips.
The 4 push pins should come in the proper position for installation, that is with the pins rotated in the opposite direction of the arrow,(clockwise)
and pulled up as far as they can go.
Take the time to play with the pushpin mechanism until you know how they work.
Orient the 4 pins so that they are exactly over the motherboard holes.
If one is out of place, you will damage the pins which are delicate.
Push down on a DIAGONAL pair of pins at the same time. Then the other pair.
When you push down on the top black pins, it expands the white plastic pins to fix the cooler in place.
If you do them one at a time, you will not get the cooler on straight.
Lastly, look at the back of the motherboard to verify that all 4 pins are equally through the motherboard, and that the cooler is on firmly.
This last step must be done, which is why the motherboard should be out of the case to do the job. Or you need a case with a opening that lets you see the pins.
It is possible to mount the cooler with the motherboard mounted in the case, but you can then never be certain that the push pins are inserted properly
unless you can verify that the pins are through the motherboard and locked.

If you should need to remove the cooler, first run the cpu to heat it up and soften the paste before shutting down and powering off the pc. That makes it easy to unstick the old cooler.
Turn the pins counter clockwise to unlock them.
You will need to clean off the old paste and reapply new if you ever take the cooler off.
Clean off old paste with alcohol and a lint free paper like a coffee filter.
Apply new paste sparingly. A small rice sized drop in the center will spread our under heat and pressure.

It is hard to use too little.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Dec 4, 2021
14
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10
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Constant temperature warnings.

"Temperature does not move from 100C".

On a PC, not a laptop.

You have obvious cooling issues. If temps are in fact 100, I'd expect your CPU is throttling....as it should.

You need to get to the bottom of this.

Could be poorly mounted cooler. Maybe dislodged.

I'm assuming high temps are true, not simply measuring errors.

In a typical situation, all case fans and the cpu fan should push air toward the back of the case where you hopefully have an exhaust fan, also blowing out.
Yeah, it practically buzzes the whole entire time the game is running

My CPU doesn't seem to throttle, well nowhere near as much as it did before I had the temp problem because the CPU speed is way better now, which is why I'm so confused.

And I'm pretty sure my fan is on properly because it does not move at all when I try to move it around.

I could only assume it's because haven't reapplied thermal paste, but even then I can't see why not having new thermal on after taking out the fan would pose such a big deal.
 

4745454b

Titan
Moderator
An easy way to see if it's an incorrect sensor is to point a house fan at the case with the side off. Turn it to med or so and it should drop the temps quickly. If it doesn't, you have a bad sensor. If it does, you have a bad cooler.

It's been a long time since I used the stock Intel fan. Last time was on my E6600. It was a mess. And the clips can break. Though it would wiggle bad so you'd notice that. Are you using a stock fan, or the stock fan that came with that CPU? The 4590 should have a copper slug in the center of the heatsink. Lower end models were just aluminum. I would argue if you are having a temp issues I'd just upgrade the cooling. Aftermarket coolers cool better and are quieter. They aren't that costly either. One of these might be worth it.

https://www.tomsguide.com/best-picks/best-coolers
 

Lafong

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Do yourself a favor. Throw the Intel cooler thing into a ditch.

Pay 20 to 60 to get a replacement that has an entirely different mounting mechanism. Now is your chance since you have thermal paste ordered.
 
Dec 4, 2021
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Did you remove the cooler when you "cleaned the fan"?

If you did in fact remove the cooler, then presumably you did not re-attach it properly.

If you did NOT remove the cooler, it may still have become dislodged when you "cleaned the fan".

I wouldn't expect that a typical fan cleaning would involve thermal paste at all.......................unless you also removed the cooler.

The standard Intel cooler mounting mechanism was a hopeless mess the last time I fiddled with it, which has been close to 10 years. It isn't easy to use, but it is easy to mistakenly think it is properly attached.
I didn't realize fan cleaning meant only the fan, I removed the whole entire cooling system (fan and heatsink) and separated both components and vacuumed both of them, then I reassembled them and put it back in with the push-pins (It was unplugged from the motherboard the whole time I vacuumed it).

I was having problems at first trying to put the cooling system back because one of the push-pins was jammed, but I fixed it and managed to put the cooling system back in properly (or at least I assume properly).
 

4745454b

Titan
Moderator
If you removed the metal part, you need to reapply the TIM. Use the strongest rubbing alcohol you can get to clean the parts. It can harden once it's applied which is why you need to clean it. It's physically pushing up the heatsink in places which prevents proper contact.
 

Lafong

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I was having problems at first trying to put the cooling system back because one of the push-pins was jammed, but I fixed it and managed to put the cooling system back in properly (or at least I assume properly).
Nearly a certainty that your assumption is incorrect. Even if correct, you should have replaced the thermal paste. It is possible that you reattached it properly, but the thermal paste was removed by your cleaning attempts and thus you have no thermal paste at all......metal to metal contact.

Regardless, you need to remove the cooler again and repaste the CPU.

Or.....better yet.....get a replacement cooler.
 
Dec 4, 2021
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Assuming it has 4 hold down screws, one on each corner...having just one of those not fully tightened is enough to cause ineffective contact, and the CPU to rise to 100C.
Once the CPU is at 100C, it WILL reduce its performance to keep itself from melting into a pile of goo.

You'll need to take it off, clean and replace the thermal paste, and install it correctly.
My CPU cooler uses push-pins to keep it down (plastic shitty ones). I was having problems trying to get two of the push pins down (both on the same side) but after a while I heard them click when I pushed down on them so I assumed they were in properly. I also removed the cpu cooler multiple times and put it back in as I assumed that it could be that they weren't put in properly, but I'm pretty sure it is in properly because the whole thing doesn't move at all no matter what direction I try to move it.

The CPU doesn't throttle at all or nearly as much as it did before I took the cooling system out, because the processor speed when I play games is almost 3x greater now, but so is the temperature problem.

Oh and I also haven't reapplied new thermal paste, but I didn't think it would be that big of a deal. I'm going to get some from the store tomorrow.
 
Dec 4, 2021
14
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10
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An easy way to see if it's an incorrect sensor is to point a house fan at the case with the side off. Turn it to med or so and it should drop the temps quickly. If it doesn't, you have a bad sensor. If it does, you have a bad cooler.

It's been a long time since I used the stock Intel fan. Last time was on my E6600. It was a mess. And the clips can break. Though it would wiggle bad so you'd notice that. Are you using a stock fan, or the stock fan that came with that CPU? The 4590 should have a copper slug in the center of the heatsink. Lower end models were just aluminum. I would argue if you are having a temp issues I'd just upgrade the cooling. Aftermarket coolers cool better and are quieter. They aren't that costly either. One of these might be worth it.

https://www.tomsguide.com/best-picks/best-coolers
The heat sink has a copper hole or slug thing in it if that's what your talking about so its not "low-end", although it is a stock fan so I'd assume it's still <Mod Edit>. I'm gonna go to the store tomorrow and buy some thermal paste and see if that fixes the problem.
 
Dec 4, 2021
14
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Nearly a certainty that your assumption is incorrect. Even if correct, you should have replaced the thermal paste. It is possible that you reattached it properly, but the thermal paste was removed by your cleaning attempts and thus you have no thermal paste at all......metal to metal contact.

Regardless, you need to remove the cooler again and repaste the CPU.

Or.....better yet.....get a replacement cooler.
I mean that thing does not move AT ALL when I try to shift it around nor do I hear any rattling sounds when I jiggle it , so It should be on real good. There is still a fair bit of thermal paste on it so it's not in direct contact with the cpu, but yes the paste is almost 3 years old now so it definitely needs replacing.
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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I mean that thing does not move AT ALL when I try to shift it around nor do I hear any rattling sounds when I jiggle it , so It should be on real good. There is still a fair bit of thermal paste on it so it's not in direct contact with the cpu, but yes the paste is almost 3 years old now so it definitely needs replacing.
One corner not fully latched is enough to cause what you see.
I've had that happen personally.
 
Dec 4, 2021
14
0
10
0
When you say you removed the fan, do you mean you removed the cooler(some equate fan to cooler)?

Whenever you remove a cooler, the old paste must be cleaned off and new applied.
That is likely the source of your problem.

What is the make/model of your case and fan arrangement?
Any cooler needs a good source of fresh air to let it do it's job.
Ditto for the graphics card.
Two 120mm front intakes should be minimum.

Here is my stock text on how to mount the stock intel pushpin cooler.
----------------how to mount the stock Intel cooler--------------

The stock Intel cooler can be tricky to install.
A poor installation will result in higher cpu temperatures.
If properly mounted, you should expect temperatures at idle to be 10-15c. over ambient.

To mount the Intel stock cooler properly, place the motherboard on top of the foam or cardboard backing that was packed with the motherboard.
The stock cooler will come with paste pre applied, it looks like three grey strips.
The 4 push pins should come in the proper position for installation, that is with the pins rotated in the opposite direction of the arrow,(clockwise)
and pulled up as far as they can go.
Take the time to play with the pushpin mechanism until you know how they work.
Orient the 4 pins so that they are exactly over the motherboard holes.
If one is out of place, you will damage the pins which are delicate.
Push down on a DIAGONAL pair of pins at the same time. Then the other pair.
When you push down on the top black pins, it expands the white plastic pins to fix the cooler in place.
If you do them one at a time, you will not get the cooler on straight.
Lastly, look at the back of the motherboard to verify that all 4 pins are equally through the motherboard, and that the cooler is on firmly.
This last step must be done, which is why the motherboard should be out of the case to do the job. Or you need a case with a opening that lets you see the pins.
It is possible to mount the cooler with the motherboard mounted in the case, but you can then never be certain that the push pins are inserted properly
unless you can verify that the pins are through the motherboard and locked.

If you should need to remove the cooler, first run the cpu to heat it up and soften the paste before shutting down and powering off the pc. That makes it easy to unstick the old cooler.
Turn the pins counter clockwise to unlock them.
You will need to clean off the old paste and reapply new if you ever take the cooler off.
Clean off old paste with alcohol and a lint free paper like a coffee filter.
Apply new paste sparingly. A small rice sized drop in the center will spread our under heat and pressure.

It is hard to use too little.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I have not applied any new paste after removing the cooling system which is probably the problem, but I assume the system is attached properly because it does not budge at all when I try to wiggle it.

I might try taking the motherboard out next time I reinstall to see if it is in properly, but right now my biggest concern is the paste which I will get tomorrow.
 

Lafong

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I'll try taking the whole motherboard out tomorrow and reinstalling the cooling system in hopes that I will get a better angle to determine that its in properly or not.
Good idea.

Going from memory, it's much easier to see if that demoralizing Intel mechanism is properly attached by looking at the back side of the motherboard.

Otherwise, you can be easily deceived.
 

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