Question I feel like the PSU is causing this problem, but I’m not entirely sure or why.

Jul 31, 2019
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This weekend, I just finished a summer project of mine which was building a desktop. I recently just got everything put together and all the software and games of mine installed.
Here are all the specs:

CPU: AMD Ryzen 2700X (not overclocked)
GPU: Nvidia GTX 2060 (not overclocked)
RAM: Corsair Vengeance RGB (2x8GB) — 3000MHz

Motherboard: ASUS ROG STRIX B-450F
Storage:
  • Samsung EVO 870 250GB M.2 SSD
  • Sabrent 512 GB M.2 SSD
  • Western Digital 1TB HDD
PSU: EVGA 600W 80+ Silver
Monitors (shouldn’t really matter, but I’ll add it): Sceptre 75 Hz 22” Monitors (2)

Earlier today, I just got done testing and benchmarking playing Destiny 2 on this build, and the CPU under load was about 58 C on average, peaking at 65 C.
After I exited the game and started browsing for dual monitor wallpapers when the monitors suddenly went black and the fans in the case started going full speed and the monitors read “No Signal.” Attempted to power off the desktop by holding the power button for 5 seconds to hard reset, however the computer failed to shut down to those means. Finally shut off the computer by flipping off the PSU switch in the back. Computer started up just fine after that after letting it cool for 5-10 minutes.
I’m not entirely sure what caused this, and I would like to know if anyone really knows what caused it and/or how to fix it.

Edit: Reason why I listed it under PSU subforum is because I feel that it’s a PSU issue, but I am unsure.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
I don't believe EVGA make a 600W "silver" unit.
600W white, most likely. A fairly poor quality unit, but I would've assumed it would do ok for that build at stock.

Unfortunately, the only way to verify 100% would be to replace the PSU with a known working, quality unit. But it does seem like a good place to start.
 
Jul 31, 2019
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I don't believe EVGA make a 600W "silver" unit.
600W white, most likely. A fairly poor quality unit, but I would've assumed it would do ok for that build at stock.

Unfortunately, the only way to verify 100% would be to replace the PSU with a known working, quality unit. But it does seem like a good place to start.
Took me a second to remember that it was a White. Didn’t know it was poor quality. Seen many good reviews about it, which is why I bought it.
 
Jul 31, 2019
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Actual "reviews" or just "feedback"? Unfortunately, it's not great and, for the money, there's almost always a better option available.
Most I looked up were verified purchasers’ reviews on Best Buy and Amazon. I don’t quite understand what could be so bad about the PSU when there’s a ton of positive reviews about it. Perhaps the system specifications are just too much for the PSU to handle, or the PSU is defective.
 

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
Most I looked up were verified purchasers’ reviews on Best Buy and Amazon. I don’t quite understand what could be so bad about the PSU when there’s a ton of positive reviews about it. Perhaps the system specifications are just too much for the PSU to handle, or the PSU is defective.
Because those aren't reviews. Without specialized equipment, a consumer can only tell if the PC starts or not. It would be like assuming that everyone who is alive has a healthy heart simply because they're not dead.

This is what testing consists of:

http://www.jonnyguru.com/testing-methodology/

If a review doesn't do this, it's not a review.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
It's simple. Most of the ppl doing those 'reviews' are not using high end equipment. They use a 600w psu as a stock replacement after their 325w OEM psu quit. It's not hard even for a 600w White to do well on a pc pushing 200w.

And of course, as the entire world knows, more watts equals a better psu.
 
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