[SOLVED] I found a setting in my updated BIOS called "LCLK DPM" -- what is it ?

Vana Ivan Pandovski

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Jan 15, 2014
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So I updated the BIOS and In it I found something called LCLK DPM, can someone explain to me what does that stands for and what is it's purpose ?
I checked google but I kinda didn't find much on it. So I really want to know what is that, should I enable it, disable it or leave it on Auto ?

Here are 4 images from the BIOS, it's located in the AMD overclocking section. Thanks.


 
Thanks at least someone told me What it is GOOGLE doesn't know what it is. But in general, we know the acronym Local Clock and Dynamic Power Management, but what does it do that is the question?
Well...I found out what the acronym refers to by scanning through some old AMD CPU design documents (freely available Zen and Promontory platform architecture documents are scarce to non-existent on the web). They're far to deep in the weeds and so not very informative concerning those BIOS options you're looking at. And since it concerns an older CPU and platform architecture specifics may not apply the same way anyhow.

But I think, looking at it logically, the settings have to do with how dynamic power management transitions of the PCIe bus are to be co-ordinated with a device that's plugged into said bus. SO, if you have a device that is non-standard with respect to it's ability to handle DPM transitions you can alter how the system handles it short of completely disabling, which might itself leave the system unstable.

But that's just a guess. And to add to the guesses: it was probably added to help deal with problems surfacing with some of the PCIe gen 4 cards coming on the market. I bet it's only going to be used when one of their support techs tells you to make a change when you have related problems.
 
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So I updated the BIOS and In it I found something called LCLK DPM, can someone explain to me what does that stands for and what is it's purpose ?
...
Local Clock (LCLK) Dynamic Power Management (DPM) settings.

Not sure what 'local clock' is but logically it's the bus clock. It has an impact on PCIe, as the settings suggest, which if not changed in a complementary way might make installed devices unstable during power saving transitions. I say leave it alone too as it's not likely to give you any benefits aside from possible experience chasing down random reboots and BSOD's.
 
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Vana Ivan Pandovski

Distinguished
Jan 15, 2014
258
8
18,815
18
Local Clock (LCLK) Dynamic Power Management (DPM) settings.

Not sure what 'local clock' is but logically it's the bus clock. It has an impact on PCIe, as the settings suggest, which if not changed in a complementary way might make installed devices unstable during power-saving transitions. I say leave it alone too as it's not likely to give you any benefits aside from possible experience chasing down random reboots and BSOD's.
Thanks at least someone told me What it is GOOGLE doesn't know what it is. But in general, we know the acronym Local Clock and Dynamic Power Management, but what does it do that is the question?
 
Thanks at least someone told me What it is GOOGLE doesn't know what it is. But in general, we know the acronym Local Clock and Dynamic Power Management, but what does it do that is the question?
Well...I found out what the acronym refers to by scanning through some old AMD CPU design documents (freely available Zen and Promontory platform architecture documents are scarce to non-existent on the web). They're far to deep in the weeds and so not very informative concerning those BIOS options you're looking at. And since it concerns an older CPU and platform architecture specifics may not apply the same way anyhow.

But I think, looking at it logically, the settings have to do with how dynamic power management transitions of the PCIe bus are to be co-ordinated with a device that's plugged into said bus. SO, if you have a device that is non-standard with respect to it's ability to handle DPM transitions you can alter how the system handles it short of completely disabling, which might itself leave the system unstable.

But that's just a guess. And to add to the guesses: it was probably added to help deal with problems surfacing with some of the PCIe gen 4 cards coming on the market. I bet it's only going to be used when one of their support techs tells you to make a change when you have related problems.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Vana Ivan Pandovski

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