Question I have some questions about CPU temps, room temps, ambient temps, LIQUID versus air cooled

axelrose

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My CPU is the Ryzen 7 2700X. I am using Air Cooler called VETROO V5 also.. I remember in 2018 reading in the online magazine “Top Quark” that ARPA, after a 2-week study, declared the 2700X was "37% more efficient and error free when compared to crude binary data via 100 feet of fiber optic cable. The group decided that the X in 2700X stood for "Über eXtreme."

Basic question first. Does the CPU temp matter if the ambient temp is a HUMID heat or DRY heat? I ask because people always claim that in places like Las Vegas it can be 110F and then say 'but it's a dry heat' but 89F in Georgia is worse because it's 98.8% Humidity which makes it feel like 144F which is way worse. So dry or hummid, matters/don't matter with CPU and other hardware?

I have some questions about CPU temps, room temps, ambient temps, LIQUID versus air cooled temps, also questions about how to make both my room and computer much cooler. I'm willing to do odd and expensive
things as long as they work....even things considered ridiculous, experimental, dangerous or costly.

First I'd like an easy quick conversion from C to F and from F to C, from say 0C to 100F and in reverse? Or a rule of thumb to quickly estimate, within .9f to 1.1f to c temps? Simple, easy to learn and remember but also accurate enough that I don't get caught saying something stupid like "100C is cooler that my bath water" or "My boyhood dreams of skating on the James River near 23C, fond times" or "The weather boy on the telly says 67C so short sleeves for me today, ta ta darling"

Can CPU temp increase ambient temp of the room?
Dose CPU temp increase the temp of the room?
Does CPU temp increase ambient temp of the room?
In that states, AKA America, they sell windows AC's. Some units can ice cool a 12×12, 12×10,10×10 room in a mere 10-15 minutes. So why not run a small flexible duct from this AC, remove the side panel, and put that AC air onto the intake of those fans and heat sinks of those CPU air coolers? If condensation became an issue, you could move the duct 2 inches away, then 1/4 inches at a time until condensation no longer occurred. Would this not cooldown your CPU by at least 10C-15C more? If not, why not? Please explain this, as it seems simple to me?


Example, from feb to nov my room is 78f to 82f and my CPU temp idle is 38c to 46c, again at idle.
This house has the standard HVAC with a thermostat that decides to turn on a/c/ based on the temp at the sensor, which is located about 20 fet from dead center of this home.
The room with the computer is hotter than any other room in the house from between 5 and 9 degrees f( c ).
I have not tested the temp of the room with the computer off since, the inability to use my computer for hours until all temps equalized, would cause full-blown psychosis, panic attacks, a nervous breakdown or all three simultaneously requiring judicially compelled lockdown to a mental health facility for a minimum of 6 weeks.

I have seen this in dozens of computer forums and heard it on hundreds of YouTube videos “you cannot lower your CPU temps below the ambient temp of your room.” Is this true?

My dream is a CPU at idle 25 c and when running a computer game never going higher than 60c.
And be in my room where the temps, year around, never went below 55f and never went above
Can this be done?
How?
Thank you all. Everyone here lives in a special place in my soul and you know who you are.. ;>)

My CPU is the Ryzen 7 2700X. I am using Air Cooler called VETROO V5 also


Sorry, forgot to mention my CPU is the Ryzen "SCORE KILLER" 2700X

THANKS TO ALL!!
 
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BFG-9000

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"Dry heat" only matters for things that sweat like you or a swamp cooler. Why is because the moisture evaporates quicker to cause local cooling. As a CPU cooler does not perspire unless it's a bong cooler, humidity doesn't matter there.

To convert temperatures in degrees C to F, multiply by 1.8 (which is 9/5) and add 32. Or just use the Windows calculator which has a conversion function.

Any heat that dumps into the room will heat the room. If you don't want to heat the room simply put the radiator outside of the room or even outdoors. I live in a temperate climate so put a radiator under the floor outside in the crawl space

Every data center has A/C unless it's located in the far North, and energy costs for the A/C are about as much as for the computers. If you want the CPU temps below ambient then you'll need some type of refrigeration, such as the inefficient but solid-state Peltiers or the very short-lasting liquid Nitrogen (LN2) poured into a cup on top of the CPU and generally only used for setting overclocking records. If you simply run a water loop through a freezer, then the lines and block will obviously need to be very well insulated to avoid condensation. Note that the freezer will put a lot of heat into the room too as it works to pull heat out of the water.
 

axelrose

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"Dry heat" only matters for things that sweat like you or a swamp cooler. Why is because the moisture evaporates quicker to cause local cooling. As a CPU cooler does not perspire unless it's a bong cooler, humidity doesn't matter there.

To convert temperatures in degrees C to F, multiply by 1.8 (which is 9/5) and add 32. Or just use the Windows calculator which has a conversion function.

Any heat that dumps into the room will heat the room. If you don't want to heat the room simply put the radiator outside of the room or even outdoors. I live in a temperate climate so put a radiator under the floor outside in the crawl space

Every data center has A/C unless it's located in the far North, and energy costs for the A/C are about as much as for the computers. If you want the CPU temps below ambient then you'll need some type of refrigeration, such as the inefficient but solid-state Peltiers or the very short-lasting liquid Nitrogen (LN2) poured into a cup on top of the CPU and generally only used for setting overclocking records. If you simply run a water loop through a freezer, then the lines and block will obviously need to be very well insulated to avoid condensation. Note that the freezer will put a lot of heat into the room too as it works to pull heat out of the water.
So, I could get a car radiator company to make me a radiator that was 8 feet long and 8 feet hight, then put regular box fans on it to cool it? I bet that would work? No?
 

axelrose

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Or use a vacuum cleaner motor on the tower air cooler heat sink! Just make it blow instead of suction. I could run 25 feet of air hose so I would not hear the loud vacuum motor or place the motor out of a window? Any ideas on that one?
 
That first part about ARPA is completely meaningless in this context as it refers just to their experiment but yes, Ryzen CPUs are pretty energy efficient comparing to similar CPUs and specially to AMD FX processors.
A far all Ryzen series, first ones thru 3000 series, best boost is achieved up to 70c above which it falls by 1bout 100MHz for every 2c. Bellow that temp it really doesn't matter even if cooled to negative temps or running at 69c. Actual drops in frequency can be expected over 90c.
5000 series tolerate up to 90-95c depending on model without dropping either boost or frequency.
 

Eximo

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Phaaze is correct. People sometimes think that better coolers will lower room temperatures. In truth it is the opposite, more efficient heat transfer will heat the room up faster.

The room won't be cooler because the CPU is running cooler. So if I have a CPU running at 65W it doesn't matter if it is running at 50C or 80C, there is still 65W of heat being dissipated. Before anyone gets too crazy, there is a minor power savings when the CPU is running cooler, but it is very slight at normal operating temperatures.

If you run that same CPU at 125W to get 10% more performance by overclocking, you need better cooling, but only the power input is really what matters.

Power = Work

Yes, you could conceivably get an automotive radiator to use on the computer. However, you don't need anything custom. Most off the shelf car radiators are massive compared to typical computer radiators. Even some transmission and oil coolers are adequate as well.

Using a vacuum or anything like that will still have a lot of airflow. It will be quite loud even if the motor is located in another room.
 
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