I need a PSU and I'll get whichever brand you tell me to

tronracer

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Specs:
Asus P5N-D nForce 750i SLI Socket 775 Motherboard
OCZ SLI-Ready Dual Channel 4096MB PC6400 DDR2 800MHz Memory (2x2048MB)
M501-1018 :: Sabrent SBT-RDIT Silicon Image Ultra ATA 100/133 IDE RAID PCI Controller Card (0.25 lbs)(So that I can use 3 IDE Hard drives I already own)
P56-9604 :: PNY GeForce 9600 GT Video Card - 512MB DDR3, PCI Express 2.0, (2) Dual Link DVI, HDTV, VGA Support (1.3 lbs)
CP1-DUO-E7400 :: Intel Core 2 Duo E7400 Processor BX80571E7400 - 2.80GHz, 3MB Cache, 1066MHz FSB, Wolfdale-3M, Dual-Core, Retail, Socket 775 (0.4 lbs)

So I need a PSU that is scalable so that I can eventually have 2 video cards. And one that is a decent brand, Corsair, seasonic, etc...and also need at least 5 molex connectors all for under $100. I'd like modular, but not a neccessity. I ha ven't had much luck searching for bargains...
 
For your $100 range

PC Power & Cooling 610
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817703005
$85 after MIR

Or if you can spend a bit more:
PC Power & Cooling 750(Red)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817341011
$100 after MIR.

Corsair 650TX:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139005
$70 after MIR

Corsair 750TX
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139006
$90 after MIR.

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Any of the above PSUs will work fine and all of them can run 9600GTs in SLI with ease. The 750W are good enough for GTX 280 in SLI
 

LouisM

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go for antec 550, nothing less than 550W otherwise you might have problems with the GPU as i have discovered just the other day after my build
 

tronracer

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So I went for the Corsair 650w. Thanks for all the advice. That was the one I was leanign towards. Well, that one and a seasonic 550 recertified for 70 bucks, but the seasonic had 4 12v rails and 18amps on each of the 12v rails and I heard that a single 12v rail was better so I just went with the Corsair. I also read that Seasonic makes the Corsair line for them anyway... I hope that adding another video card down the line it will have enough wattage.
 
The Corsair is an excellent choice (Seasonic is also quite good). You should be happy with that PSU for some time to come - it is definitely a powerhouse with that monstrous 12V rail.
 

tronracer

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This new system is replacing my MSI K8N MOBO with an ATI 256k video card and 2 hard drives with a 400w Thermaltake PSU. My girlfriend kept tripping the circuit breaker with her hair dryer after repeated attempts to prevent the blackouts. So after 10 times or so, the PC wouldn't turn on again. Took it to a computer place and they said the PSU, MOBO and CPU were bad. She refuses to take responsibility claiming it must've been a bad PSU because someone at Tiger Direct told her that the PSU must've already been bad. Any ideas or theories? What's more likely? A 3 year old PC and a one year old MOBO went bad (I warrantied the MOBO about 1 1/2 years ago) or she blew it out by power surging the crap out of it with her hair dryer?
 
This is kind of weird, how much can that dryer possibly consume, thousands of watts???

The 650TX resists better than many others when it comes to fluctuations in the wall socket. It would also help if you got a power strip with surge protection.

Buy the GF a new hair dryer on her next birthday, it might help too.
 

croc

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You, mate, have a power problem. Your GF has all the power, and you have all of the problem. I'm sure that you have more than one circuit, find a socket on another circuit and banish her, and her hairdryer, to that circuit. If that circuit is in another town, preferably another state, all the better...
 

croc

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As aevm said, "This is kind of weird, how much can that dryer possibly consume, thousands of watts???"

You should have a 20a circuit. If not more... (After 10 trips to the electric box, you should know better than I...) Most wet areas have a GFI circuit, and should not have any other sockets on that circuit. OK, let's assume that you are in an older building. No GFI. Still, one 20a circuit should provide ~2400 watts. I highly doubt that your PSU is drawing more than 9a at full load. More like 3 to 5a total. So that leaves 15a available for the offending hairdryer. That leaves 1800 watts for the hairdryer. Either you have a defective circuit breaker, or your GF has a defective dryer, or both.

Get a good UPS if your power is that flaky, and get your GF a new hairdryer. (One would have thought that after two or three trips to the electric box, you'd have figured this out all by yourself.) Refer back to my original post...

"You, mate, have a power problem. Your GF has all the power, and you have all of the problem. I'm sure that you have more than one circuit, find a socket on another circuit and banish her, and her hairdryer, to that circuit. If that circuit is in another town, preferably another state, all the better..."
 

tronracer

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Actually, it was an apartment with the living room (where I kept my PC desk) and the bathroom on the same circuit. I had my TV, entertainment center, PC and peripherals, and a lamp on that circuit. Also an electrical heater as the windows in my apartment were the worst. That electrical heater drew an enormous amount of power. The point is that I told her if she wanted to use the hair dryer, I would turn the heater off and then there wouldn't be a problem. I guess she kept forgetting. The point is that the hair dryer was enough to overload the circuit. I moved from that place anyway this past month. Anyway, the question is simple: Would overloading the circuit enough to trip the circuit breaker 5 or 6 times fry the MOBO and CPU and PSU? I did recently buy a battery backup power strip btw...

Also, it was definitely the hair dryer because as soon as she turned it on, it tripped the breaker...every time.
 

croc

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If you did not turn off the PSU's switch, then yes... That would 'surge' the circuit. (I put 'surge' in semi quotes because the circuit would actually sag first, causing a brown-out, followed by an over-volt condition as the circuit stabilized. These swings would have been, ordinarily, in the time span of milliseconds, but could be prolonged by, say, the heater still on, the hair dryer still on, TV, etc.)

I have never heard of a UPS power strip. APC makes good units, as does Tripp-lite. I'd avoid Belkin.
 

tronracer

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I was calling it the wrong thing. I just looked at the box. It is an APC™ Back-UPS ES 650VA Battery Backup, 650VA/390 Watt. Circuit City went out of business and I got a deal. The place I was in had a pretty weird electrical circuitry. I noticed towards the end of my stay that I was able to turn my neighbors lights on and off from a switch in my apartment.
 

tronracer

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Okay so one more question: Would that Corsair PSU I got and the APC backup be enough protection from my 'powerful' hair dryin' of a girlfriend?
 

croc

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That's not a bad unit, but doesn't provide true isolation. Still, you aren't managing a datacenter, so it'll do.

Glad you moved, sounds like you are lucky to still have a TV...

Your choice of a PSU is a bit of an over-kill, but again, it'll do...
 

tronracer

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I seriously don't think she has a faulty hair dryer. And it's better overkill now and scale up to SLI later than underkill and have stuff breaking on me... I tried to go with all top name stuff but middle performance to keep within a $500 budget...I already had the case, hard drives, dvd drives and peripherals so this is probably a bit more than I even need...