Question I need help overclocking an i7-11700K on a Gigabyte MB

Fl1cks

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Jun 19, 2021
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Story:
I’m not an experienced overclocker. I’ve spent this entire day reading on the internet & watching a bunch of videos and tutorials on overclocking and some videos that specifically show overclocking on an i7-11700K but I’m not really getting the results as expected on my new i7-11700K after testing and playing around with different settings now that the day is coming to an end and I’m quite confused with some settings in the BIOS, specially when different motherboard brands don’t have the same name for all settings. I would really appreciate any kind of help here to give this processor a better overclock and so that I hopefully can learn as well as understand more about overclocking! Thank you.

Current BIOS Settings:
View: https://imgur.com/a/oe0UlIb


Quick Info:
The GPU is overclocked.
The RAM settings have not been touched.
The RAM sticks are running at around 2700MHz and not the 4000MHz which the XMP Profile 1 sets.
The voltages don’t matter for me right now as long as the CPU doesn’t run way too hot. When I’m satisfied with the overclocking performance of the CPU I’ll reduce and tweak the voltages, performing stress tests to hit a sweet spot.
I’m no longer able to change the Turbo Ratio numbers for each core with the current BIOS settings.
With the BIOS settings that I have right now the core clock seems to be stuck at 4.9Ghz.
Running a test using Userbenchmarks, there’s not really an increasement in “Bench” for the CPU with the current BIOS settings compared to the default settings.

Specs:
Intel Core i7-11700K
Nvidia GeForce RTX 3060
Corsair RM850X 850W
G.Skill Ballistix 4x32GB (128GB)
Gigabyte Z590 UD AC
3 x M.2 NVME Drives
1 x SATA SSD Drive
1 x SATA HDD Drive
 
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Eximo

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Image 1 You can set the XMP profile for the memory, I know many suggest testing the CPU first, but I find it is good to have the target speed set while I experiment. 4000Mhz may be difficult to achieve.

Image 2 You probably do want some AVX offset, likely to crash otherwise.

Image 3 Looks like you still have the default core turbo settings still in place, 4.9Ghz is the all core max, which is what any multithreaded benchmark will require.

Image 4, not sure what fused core max is, but you probably need to enable something to make that work over the defaults.

Image 5, You have the power limits at more or less the defaults, so the CPU won't stay at maximum output for long.

Image 6 VCore seems high, have you been changing that? 1.35v max for daily safe use, 1.4ish if you have aggressive water cooling.

Image 7, not much here LLC is set, which may help with stability.


All that said, the defaults are actually pretty decent. Up to 5.3Ghz on light tasks, and bouncing around 5Ghz for most tasks. Not very often you fully load up the CPU. Running 5.3Ghz all core will require a lot of power, close to 200W (or more depending on the voltage you need to stay there), you have to make sure your cooling can handle that.

Example, my locked i9, requires 192W at 4.6Ghz @ 1.35 volts.
 

Fl1cks

BANNED
Jun 19, 2021
77
3
35
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Image 1 You can set the XMP profile for the memory, I know many suggest testing the CPU first, but I find it is good to have the target speed set while I experiment. 4000Mhz may be difficult to achieve.

Image 2 You probably do want some AVX offset, likely to crash otherwise.

Image 3 Looks like you still have the default core turbo settings still in place, 4.9Ghz is the all core max, which is what any multithreaded benchmark will require.

Image 4, not sure what fused core max is, but you probably need to enable something to make that work over the defaults.

Image 5, You have the power limits at more or less the defaults, so the CPU won't stay at maximum output for long.

Image 6 VCore seems high, have you been changing that? 1.35v max for daily safe use, 1.4ish if you have aggressive water cooling.

Image 7, not much here LLC is set, which may help with stability.


All that said, the defaults are actually pretty decent. Up to 5.3Ghz on light tasks, and bouncing around 5Ghz for most tasks. Not very often you fully load up the CPU. Running 5.3Ghz all core will require a lot of power, close to 200W (or more depending on the voltage you need to stay there), you have to make sure your cooling can handle that.

Example, my locked i9, requires 192W at 4.6Ghz @ 1.35 volts.
Thanks. Do you have any idea of why I am unable to change the Turbo Ratio for each core in Active Turbo Ratios even tho it’s set to manual and why the cores are stuck at 4.9Ghz or 3.6Ghz for me? I’ve been playing around with some settings inside the BIOS but I haven’t been able to get this fixed!

Edit: I’m able to change the speed of the cores now that I’ve enabled Intel Turbo Technology
 
Last edited:

Fl1cks

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Jun 19, 2021
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I don’t seem to be able to disable the “Turbo Power Limits”. I’m only able to set it to Auto, POR or Enabled. Is it not possible to set it to disabled on Gigabyte boards?
 
Last edited:

Eximo

Titan
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You can just set the power limits to unrealistic values and the duration as high as it will go, that more than covers all but long duration render jobs and the like.
 
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Overclocking a cpu is no longer a way to get something for nothing.
Processors are binned and the better performing chips are used in better performing processors.
My suggestion is to first implement the ram XMP settings to get the ram speed you paid for.
Then, in the bios either use default settings or, if there is an option, select load optimized settings.
That will allow a high turbo on a few cores when conditions permit
(70c. cpu temp and low other usage)
These processors are so fast that you will not notice any difference in performance via overclocking,
You will avoid possibly damaging your processor.

Now, if you are a tinkerer and not worried about damage, go for it.
 

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