[SOLVED] I/O device error - Seagate Freeagent

May 19, 2020
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Hello,
I've got a Seegate Freeagent Desk 1 TB external drive wich had been working fine for several years.
Now, I can't access files with with file explorer and get the error "Location is not available: F: is not accessible. The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error."

I can see the drive in Device Manager (Windows 10) under Disk Drives, though. Also, the light blinks and can hear a little when I try to access the drive. Additionally, I was able to change the drive letter from E: to F:. These make me think the drive is not completely dead, but give me a little hope maybe I can save the data somehow?

I tried formating the computer and connecting the external drive to another computer, to make sure the problem isn't about the computer. The situation is the same.

In this situation do you think I can save the data in the drive?
Should I remove the drive from the external housing and connect directly to the desktop computer via SATA cable?
Should I try applying a Quick format and then try saving with a data recovery software?

Now, all matters to me is saving the data in the drive which I don't have another copy of. Then, I will scrap the drive itself.

I would appreciate any recommendations.
Thanks in advance.
 

alfarom

Distinguished
Aug 23, 2011
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1
18,545
3
Sounds like the drive is failing. If you're not sure how to get at the drive this video shows you how. Like you say, you could then connect it via a Sata cable to another pc. It might even appear in Windows as you get more control over a drive connected this way rather than through USB. If the drive is clicking then it could be the circuit board at fault but is more likely to be the read/write heads which might be beyond any software's ability to recover your data.

Seagate Freeagent Disassembly

You could try something like DMDE (try the free version and if it can recover the data then it's cheap to buy). GetDataBack isn't free but is worth a go.

You could try the linux based HDDSuperClone. It's possible to run it from a USB pen. It works well for me. The Pro version is much better and can be licenced for a couple of months for not much cash. It learns as it goes along and will skip out bad heads after a while. It can also be combined with DMDE (Linux version) to attempt data extraction. I did just this and got the data back from a badly damaged drive that I couldn't recover with any other software. If you can install a Linux OS on a drive and boot from that then HDDSuperClone Pro is one of the best cloner/data extraction products around, particularly using DMDE.
Take a look at it here. There are loads of videos explaining its use. It looks complicated at first but it sounds like you already know your way around computers so it shouldn't be too hard to pick up.

HDDSuperClone - Videos

Remember, the more you try and recover the data the more the drive will degrade.
I definitely wouldn't format the drive, you're just making things more difficult for recovery. I don't get enough drives in for recovery to be sure but it does seem that Seagate have the most unreliable hard drives.

Failing that professional DR companies should be able to help you but they aren't cheap.
 
Reactions: Phillip Corcoran

alfarom

Distinguished
Aug 23, 2011
37
1
18,545
3
Sounds like the drive is failing. If you're not sure how to get at the drive this video shows you how. Like you say, you could then connect it via a Sata cable to another pc. It might even appear in Windows as you get more control over a drive connected this way rather than through USB. If the drive is clicking then it could be the circuit board at fault but is more likely to be the read/write heads which might be beyond any software's ability to recover your data.

Seagate Freeagent Disassembly

You could try something like DMDE (try the free version and if it can recover the data then it's cheap to buy). GetDataBack isn't free but is worth a go.

You could try the linux based HDDSuperClone. It's possible to run it from a USB pen. It works well for me. The Pro version is much better and can be licenced for a couple of months for not much cash. It learns as it goes along and will skip out bad heads after a while. It can also be combined with DMDE (Linux version) to attempt data extraction. I did just this and got the data back from a badly damaged drive that I couldn't recover with any other software. If you can install a Linux OS on a drive and boot from that then HDDSuperClone Pro is one of the best cloner/data extraction products around, particularly using DMDE.
Take a look at it here. There are loads of videos explaining its use. It looks complicated at first but it sounds like you already know your way around computers so it shouldn't be too hard to pick up.

HDDSuperClone - Videos

Remember, the more you try and recover the data the more the drive will degrade.
I definitely wouldn't format the drive, you're just making things more difficult for recovery. I don't get enough drives in for recovery to be sure but it does seem that Seagate have the most unreliable hard drives.

Failing that professional DR companies should be able to help you but they aren't cheap.
 
Reactions: Phillip Corcoran

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