Question I really need help with my pc

Shoot_happens

Prominent
May 21, 2019
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I really need help with my pc and I've kinda just given up at this point
My pc has trouble posting and getting a signal, but I've tried everything that I could now. The pc boots up and everything spins. It's not running in a loop. Just running without a signal to the monitor. I have tried cleaning the ram, had the gpu out and cleaned. I've now had it at an it store and they took everything out and it posted without a problem. Stress tested all the hardware.. I took it home, set it up and now it won't post.
Really need something I can try.
Specs: i7-8700k
Asrock z370 extreme 4 mobo
Deepcool aio 280 cooler
2x8gb 3733mhz ddr4 ram
Gtx 980ti HOF 6gb
500gb nvme ssd
2tb barracuda hdd
750W Thermaltake Psu
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Remove the graphics card, connect your display cable to the video output on your motherboard and see if you get a display signal like that. Do not just move the cable, you NEED to remove the graphics card in some cases, so do so.

What is the MODEL of your Thermaltake power supply and how long has it been in service?

Are you using a power strip to plug the PSU into, or are you plugging it directly into the wall? If you are using a power strip, don't, plug the PSU directly into the wall socket.
 

Shoot_happens

Prominent
May 21, 2019
35
1
535
0
Remove the graphics card, connect your display cable to the video output on your motherboard and see if you get a display signal like that. Do not just move the cable, you NEED to remove the graphics card in some cases, so do so.

What is the MODEL of your Thermaltake power supply and how long has it been in service?

Are you using a power strip to plug the PSU into, or are you plugging it directly into the wall? If you are using a power strip, don't, plug the PSU directly into the wall socket.
Yea. Have had the gpu out several times. It's the smart rgb psu and has under a year under the belt.
And it it in an power extender atm. But could try directly from the wall
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I have no idea what a power extender is. In 50 years of life, I've never heard of a "power extender".

If you are talking about a power strip or extension cord, then yes, you need to eliminate those. Even if you were not having problems, you should not be using a power strip or extension cord to plug in the PSU. The PSU should ONLY ever be plugged directly into the wall socket or an APS battery backup system, unless you have a power line conditioner or an industrial high quality power strip. Those are not in the same kind of price range as the Monster, Belkin, Amazon basics, box store General Electric and other "cheap" power strips. All of which should be avoided.

Years of experience using PC systems and having to diagnose bushels full of issues where a high number of them ended up being faults with the circuitry inside the power strips. Primarily, cheap box store models but also a good number of supposedly premium power strip "surge protectors" that don't actually protect you from anything other than your own fear of what might happen if you actually end up needing a surge protector. A false sense of security.


Most people buy and use power strips because they THINK that the fact it says surge protector means something. Usually, it doesn't. This is one of my favorite quotes on the subject from an electrical engineer and residential/commercial electrical journeyman I know.


Buy a good one, but understand expensive OFTEN does not equal good.


"Monster" brand are the low end junk that are sold for a premium price. Look for what us professionals use. Tripp-lite is one of my go to absolute favorites as they have a price to quality mix that is exceptional. The Belkin brand is junk as far as I am concerned as they focus on how it looks and not how it works. APC is also another one that I will trust , but they mostly cater to data centers and Corporate customers when it comes to their quality units and they DO sell some lower end products that slot into the budget market that are not the same unquestionable quality as what they sell for professional and enterprise use.


Lastly, if you really care about your electronics, get a Whole house surge suppressor installed in your electrical panel. Only a few hundred bucks and it protects everything including the overpriced LED lightbulbs that is all the rage these days.

Units you want to consider will be those sold by APC, Tripp-Lite, Leviton, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric, Polyphaser, Ditek, Siemens, ABB, Square D, Intermatic, Cutler-Hammer (Eaton), and Syscom, these are the brands you can trust to have high quality internal electronics if you MUST use a power strip but even so you STILL will want to ask around about specific models OR look to professional reviews as even these big boys occasionally have a product with some glaring flaw that makes it's way into the final product and might best be avoided compared to other available models.

Do not however use a power strip thinking that it offers significant protection, because even the best of them does not, not really. Whole house protection is the only real protection from surges.


Monster and Belkin, and a few others that are commonly used, almost unilaterally use the same protections in their 45 dollar surge protector strips as what you would find in an 8 dollar Amazon or Walmart branded model. And if you ever take one of these, or any cheap box store, dollar store (Even worse than these others usually BUT occasionally about the same) or Harbor Freight power strip apart you are likely to find frayed wires, poorly soldered connections with blobs of solder nearly touching crucial and potential short circuit points, super low quality MOVs, and a ton of other indicators that no real integrity was involved in the design or manufacturer of these units.


Another factor to keep in mind is that even with some of these high quality units, any protection that MIGHT be afforded, is usually the end of that product after one shot. This, directly from the Tripp-Lite manual for the #1 selling surge protection power strip in the world.


All models feature an internal protection that will disconnect the surge-protective component at the end of its useful life but will maintain power to the load now unprotected.

I believe many models from APC and a couple of the others I listed have now incorporated designs that permanently disengage any ability of the device to deliver power once a surge or short of significant enough caliber to incur the protection has occured. That basically means once there has been a surge or short, throw the device away. Even for high end models. Only whole house protection and properly earthed circuits offer any true protection from a serious surge or direct strike from lightning somewhere close enough to affect your segment of the grid.


And whatever you do, don't EVER buy any kind of extension cord, power strip or other electronic device with slip rings.


 

Shoot_happens

Prominent
May 21, 2019
35
1
535
0
I have no idea what a power extender is. In 50 years of life, I've never heard of a "power extender".

If you are talking about a power strip or extension cord, then yes, you need to eliminate those. Even if you were not having problems, you should not be using a power strip or extension cord to plug in the PSU. The PSU should ONLY ever be plugged directly into the wall socket or an APS battery backup system, unless you have a power line conditioner or an industrial high quality power strip. Those are not in the same kind of price range as the Monster, Belkin, Amazon basics, box store General Electric and other "cheap" power strips. All of which should be avoided.

Years of experience using PC systems and having to diagnose bushels full of issues where a high number of them ended up being faults with the circuitry inside the power strips. Primarily, cheap box store models but also a good number of supposedly premium power strip "surge protectors" that don't actually protect you from anything other than your own fear of what might happen if you actually end up needing a surge protector. A false sense of security.


Most people buy and use power strips because they THINK that the fact it says surge protector means something. Usually, it doesn't. This is one of my favorite quotes on the subject from an electrical engineer and residential/commercial electrical journeyman I know.





Units you want to consider will be those sold by APC, Tripp-Lite, Leviton, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric, Polyphaser, Ditek, Siemens, ABB, Square D, Intermatic, Cutler-Hammer (Eaton), and Syscom, these are the brands you can trust to have high quality internal electronics if you MUST use a power strip but even so you STILL will want to ask around about specific models OR look to professional reviews as even these big boys occasionally have a product with some glaring flaw that makes it's way into the final product and might best be avoided compared to other available models.

Do not however use a power strip thinking that it offers significant protection, because even the best of them does not, not really. Whole house protection is the only real protection from surges.


Monster and Belkin, and a few others that are commonly used, almost unilaterally use the same protections in their 45 dollar surge protector strips as what you would find in an 8 dollar Amazon or Walmart branded model. And if you ever take one of these, or any cheap box store, dollar store (Even worse than these others usually BUT occasionally about the same) or Harbor Freight power strip apart you are likely to find frayed wires, poorly soldered connections with blobs of solder nearly touching crucial and potential short circuit points, super low quality MOVs, and a ton of other indicators that no real integrity was involved in the design or manufacturer of these units.


Another factor to keep in mind is that even with some of these high quality units, any protection that MIGHT be afforded, is usually the end of that product after one shot. This, directly from the Tripp-Lite manual for the #1 selling surge protection power strip in the world.





I believe many models from APC and a couple of the others I listed have now incorporated designs that permanently disengage any ability of the device to deliver power once a surge or short of significant enough caliber to incur the protection has occured. That basically means once there has been a surge or short, throw the device away. Even for high end models. Only whole house protection and properly earthed circuits offer any true protection from a serious surge or direct strike from lightning somewhere close enough to affect your segment of the grid.


And whatever you do, don't EVER buy any kind of extension cord, power strip or other electronic device with slip rings.


Hmm didn't know it meant that much. But yea I'm danish, so the standard brands you're listing is not a problem. If it is good brands and products I can't tell you. But I has been running fine for several years which bugs me. I will definitely keep in mind that having the psu directly to the wall is the most optimal. Having said that. The output in European outlets and American is different right? I can't really believe this to be the problem, but is something I will keep in mind :)
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
It doesn't matter what country you are in. Power strips are made cheaply in ALL countries. If you want to use a power strip with your PC then spend the money on a decent one. Nobody, not ONE SINGLE PERSON, ever thought their power strip was the problem, but in a lot of cases it was. Is it the problem in your case, hell, I don't know, but it IS definitely something you want to eliminate as being a POTENTIAL problem so you can say for sure, well, that wasn't the problem, and move on towards FINDING the problem.

If you don't think a cheaply made, old or faulty power strip can cause the problems you're having, or fifty other problems, then you seriously lack understanding about how power works, and it doesn't matter what country you are in. Power is power no matter where you are or what shape your plug is or how many volts is standard on your grid. So, believe it, or don't believe it, it doesn't change anything. Just be aware that it IS a potential source of problems and I can show you tens of threads I've participated in where a bad power strip had somebody thinking they needed a new power supply or other hardware.

The fact is, the ONLY difference between the shop you took it to, and your house, is the power strip or extension cord you are using. You can be sure that they were not using a power strip or extension cord to plug your system in to and they didn't have any problems, or if they did use a power strip they were using something that was much higher industrial type quality. There isn't really anything "wrong" with using a power strip, it's just that 90% of them sold to consumers are pieces of crap.
 

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