Question i tried putting the cpu fan in a fan controller

Dec 30, 2019
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it works and acutaly makes the cpu stay cooler but also its idle rpm is higher and overall its louder. but that doesnt bother me what im worried about is the fan blowing up after time bc of its modification its still in the stock amps but i dont if it was deigned to run at high rpms for long periods of time in the bios it does have an option to run at full speed all the time but thats it.


will it be fine? other then the fact thats its louder


https://streamable.com/9yqoa
 
Dec 24, 2019
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As long as you’re not Giving the fan more voltage than it is meant for, you should be fine. Obviously running at higher RPM will cause more wear and tear, just as if you rev the living shit out of your car every time you drive it, the engine will eventually wear out quicker.

HOWEVER... I am 99% certain that before any of that happens, your PC will have been long replaced. And even if it Burns out it looks like a standard fan - easily an inexpensively replaced.

if the fan stops working, any modern processor will simply shut it self down to prevent any damage. I don’t think you’re running a late 90’s AMD Duron, now do you?
 
Dec 30, 2019
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As long as you’re not Giving the fan more voltage than it is meant for, you should be fine. Obviously running at higher RPM will cause more wear and tear, just as if you rev the living shit out of your car every time you drive it, the engine will eventually wear out quicker.

HOWEVER... I am 99% certain that before any of that happens, your PC will have been long replaced. And even if it Burns out it looks like a standard fan - easily an inexpensively replaced.

if the fan stops working, any modern processor will simply shut it self down to prevent any damage. I don’t think you’re running a late 90’s AMD Duron, now do you?
do most cpu fans run 12v bc idk if this cpu fan is 7v
 

Gfost73

Upstanding
Mar 23, 2019
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most PC (desktop) fans are 12v... Laptop fans often between 3v-5v.. the wires are Red(voltage).. black (neutral) yellow( is fan speed control)
 

Mr.Spock

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Dec 8, 2019
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the Xeons are usually binned better and designed for server environments so they shouldn't add significant heat to the equation
have you seen a dramatic increase in temps, maybe it just your choice of thermal paste

uhh im using a xeon on a prebuilt dell mobo with a oem cooler in a different case
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
It's a Dell stock fan in a pc. It's variable voltage from @ 7v-12v.

Your temp issues are most probably a combination of airflow and minimal heatsink, not the fan. 'An OEM cooler' doesn't say much, Dell produced multiple OEM coolers and all were designed to keep the cpu at below TjMax under normal operating processes. If you have a 95w Xeon and stuck a 65w OEM cooler on it, expect very high temps doing anything. If you are using the exact OEM cooler that came with that processor, expect it to be good enough to keep temps below @ 90°C ish.

Don't expect miricles, it's an OEM cooler.
 
Dec 30, 2019
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It's a Dell stock fan in a pc. It's variable voltage from @ 7v-12v.

Your temp issues are most probably a combination of airflow and minimal heatsink, not the fan. 'An OEM cooler' doesn't say much, Dell produced multiple OEM coolers and all were designed to keep the cpu at below TjMax under normal operating processes. If you have a 95w Xeon and stuck a 65w OEM cooler on it, expect very high temps doing anything. If you are using the exact OEM cooler that came with that processor, expect it to be good enough to keep temps below @ 90°C ish.

Don't expect miricles, it's an OEM cooler.
so it should be fine in the fan controller?
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Yep. Just realize that unless the fan controller is associated with cpu temps, controlled by cpu temps, it's not going to respond to cpu temps. Most motherboards will give an error or refuse to boot unless something is attached to cpu_fan header.
 
Dec 30, 2019
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Yep. Just realize that unless the fan controller is associated with cpu temps, controlled by cpu temps, it's not going to respond to cpu temps. Most motherboards will give an error or refuse to boot unless something is attached to cpu_fan header.
i have a program that monitors cpu temps and mine still boots without a cpu fan header
 
Dec 30, 2019
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Yep. Just realize that unless the fan controller is associated with cpu temps, controlled by cpu temps, it's not going to respond to cpu temps. Most motherboards will give an error or refuse to boot unless something is attached to cpu_fanand.
Yep. Just realize that unless the fan controller is associated with cpu temps, controlled by cpu temps, it's not going to respond to cpu temps. Most motherboards will give an error or refuse to boot unless something is attached to cpu_fan header.
And when you said 7v-12v varaibley does that mean it will work fine at 12v bc that's what the fan controller puts out I'm worried it's being overvolted at 12v I ran It all day today and it seemed ok no burning smell other then the lowest knob will go it still spins high which is fine idc about noise
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Every fan intended for pc use that I've ever seen is rated for at least 12v as that's what the pc uses to power fans. (usually it's higher, like 13.4v-15v). The older 3wire/3pin analog fans are voltage controlled. At 5 or 7v (depending on the fan) it'll spin at its slowest speed. At 12v it's maxed to rated speed. So it's variable.

Newer designs like 4pin PWM run constantly at 12v, same 3 wires as analog fans, but include a 4th wire for the pwm signal. That signal runs a switch, on/off, and thats what controls fan speeds, not the voltage.

Either way, they'll all use 12v. It's still not a great idea to have non-cpu controlled fans on the cpu cooler. Instant spikes in temp happen, or usage changes and there's no way for the cpu to cool itself automatically. With cpu fan on the controller, the cpu temps are at its mercy, not the cpu.
 
Dec 30, 2019
17
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Every fan intended for pc use that I've ever seen is rated for at least 12v as that's what the pc uses to power fans. (usually it's higher, like 13.4v-15v). The older 3wire/3pin analog fans are voltage controlled. At 5 or 7v (depending on the fan) it'll spin at its slowest speed. At 12v it's maxed to rated speed. So it's variable.

Newer designs like 4pin PWM run constantly at 12v, same 3 wires as analog fans, but include a 4th wire for the pwm signal. That signal runs a switch, on/off, and thats what controls fan speeds, not the voltage.

Either way, they'll all use 12v. It's still not a great idea to have non-cpu controlled fans on the cpu cooler. Instant spikes in temp happen, or usage changes and there's no way for the cpu to cool itself automatically. With cpu fan on the controller, the cpu temps are at its mercy, not the cpu.
How many years do you think I'll get out of it
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Nobody knows. Just about everybody claims pumps will fail first or liquid will evaporate on an AIO and thats the cause of failure. Mine died after 6 years of continuous 24/7 usage. Well let me clarify, the fans died after 6 years of use, the pump was still good. I've had sleeve bearing fans last 10 years in a vertical position, I'm talking the uber cheap, ancient led clear fans that are $3 each. I've had expensive rifle bearing fans die in 6 months in a horizontal position.

Things last as long as they will, regular maintenance can help prolong that life, keeping fans clear of dust reduces the weight of the blades, so less stress on the motor etc. Decent psu voltage outputs, decent operating ranges and temps can all help, but at the end of the day a lifespan is what it is.

My grandmother was religious about maintenance on her 1978 Mercedes. When she died it had over 1 million miles and no major rebuilds. Interior was immaculate and fully functional. Most cars nowadays are junk after @ 200-250k miles. Ppl don't take care of them.
 
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