Question I want to build a NAS, how do I choose a motherboard?

iPeekYou

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They're both high-tier manufacturers, not much different aside maybe from BIOS look/minor features. Functionally identical, though.

You'd want a board with lots of SATA ports, I imagine. My Intel board in sig is capable of 6 SATA ( 2 E-SATA capable). Enough for a home server/ general backup stuff.
 

lvt

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Unless you buy a Gigabyte motherboard with Dual Bios (you are virtually immune from Bios corruption, which is a plus over the other), they are technically similar for what you need.
 
May 30, 2021
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Well, both best for you but which is more perfect depends on the use of it like most gaming computer companies build a computer with an ASUS motherboard because of the high quality of fan control and software but Gigabyte has more trust and value than ASUS.
so if I am making a gaming computer then I will go with ASUS otherwise you can use Gigabyte.
Thank you for your advice
 

iPeekYou

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Unless you buy a Gigabyte motherboard with Dual Bios (you are virtually immune from Bios corruption, which is a plus over the other), they are technically similar for what you need.
Do they still have that feature? I remember owning an old GB board that does, and it was advertised all over the box and product page. My current GB board doesn't have the same advertising blurb. Honestly surprised if they stopped doing it. Dual BIOS was the point that got me the old GB board in the first place.
 

lvt

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Do they still have that feature? I remember owning an old GB board that does, and it was advertised all over the box and product page. My current GB board doesn't have the same advertising blurb. Honestly surprised if they stopped doing it. Dual BIOS was the point that got me the old GB board in the first place.
I think they do, for example I know that the GA-EX58-EXTREME is a LGA1366 that supports i7 CPU, there might be other more recent motherboards as well.

https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/GA-EX58-EXTREME-rev-10#ov
 
May 30, 2021
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Do they still have that feature? I remember owning an old GB board that does, and it was advertised all over the box and product page. My current GB board doesn't have the same advertising blurb. Honestly surprised if they stopped doing it. Dual BIOS was the point that got me the old GB board in the first place.
Thank you for letting me know about these things
 

TommyTwoTone66

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Curious, why are you building a NAS out of a PC rather than just buying one?

A dedicated 2-bay or 4-bay NAS enclosure from Synology or QNAP will be cheaper than building a PC, take up a lot less space, use a ton less power and come with a ready-made NAS software already installed, that you can just plug in and start using.

For example a QNAP TR-004 is under $200 and would hold 4 HDDs.
 

USAFRet

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Curious, why are you building a NAS out of a PC rather than just buying one?

A dedicated 2-bay or 4-bay NAS enclosure from Synology or QNAP will be cheaper than building a PC, take up a lot less space, use a ton less power and come with a ready-made NAS software already installed, that you can just plug in and start using.

For example a QNAP TR-004 is under $200 and would hold 4 HDDs.
The TR-004 is not a true NAS. I have one, as an adjunct to my TS-453a.
It is more an external enclosure.

The TS-453a is a true NAS, with its own fully capable OS.
 

punkncat

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I have done quite a few "NAS" builds over the years. Most often was something along the lines of a repurposed computer with shared storage. I built an ASUS "system on a board" type build which came with (6) SATA connectors. I used this in a Lian Li case that had a rack for (5) 3.5" HDD and placement for two others on the basement. On that build I utilized FreeNAS at first, but changed it to Windows (Pro) later on. My current preference for such builds is a Windows OS build type design, mostly due to my familiarity with that specific OS. FreeNAS wasn't "hard", but there was a learning curve and I just ended up not liking to deal with what I saw as a hassle.
I have used and am currently using some of the specific NAS build hardware. Right now I have a Synology and have utilized a D-Link DNS model some years ago. Where I like the small footprint and low power use, I cannot say I am specifically crazy about the Synology.
My main issue is that it uses a 'proprietary' (Linux?) based format. The only thing I own that can read it is the Synology unit. It has a "mirror" and all that fancy sounding, warm fuzzy feeling invoking tech speak but the truth of the matter is that if the unit itself goes down it is a difficult matter to save the info contained on it's drives. When using a Windows share as a NAS, and it fails for reasons outside the drive itself all you need is an open bay in a PC, or a dock to recover your data readily and easily.
 

USAFRet

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My main issue is that it uses a 'proprietary' (Linux?) based format. The only thing I own that can read it is the Synology unit. It has a "mirror" and all that fancy sounding, warm fuzzy feeling invoking tech speak but the truth of the matter is that if the unit itself goes down it is a difficult matter to save the info contained on it's drives. When using a Windows share as a NAS, and it fails for reasons outside the drive itself all you need is an open bay in a PC, or a dock to recover your data readily and easily.
As another accessory to my (linux based) QNAP, there is a 4 bay MediaSonic USB enclosure.

The 4 drives in it, 8TB, 3TB, 3TB, 3TB are all formatted NTFS.
Directly accessible in the QNAP, or via a Windows system. Or, pop the drive out and put it in a USB dock connected directly to any Windows PC.
All data readily accessible.
 
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USAFRet

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And that is part of my BugOut checklist. If we need to evacuate...grab the topmost drive out of that enclosure, the 8TB.
It gets a weekly update of any critical personal data. Along with a big movie/music library. All I'd neeed is any desktop PC, or a readily available USB dock or cable.

In the QNAP, you can format the drives as desired. Except for maybe the system drive, any of the other 3 can also be NTFS.
 

punkncat

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And that is part of my BugOut checklist. If we need to evacuate...grab the topmost drive out of that enclosure, the 8TB.
It gets a weekly update of any critical personal data. Along with a big movie/music library. All I'd neeed is any desktop PC, or a readily available USB dock or cable.

In the QNAP, you can format the drives as desired. Except for maybe the system drive, any of the other 3 can also be NTFS.

I keep a 'bug out bag' in which has the physical written items I need to have of import and also keep a 2.5" enclosure with a backup of what I deem important with it. I update it about 3-4 times a year when I think about it.
To be fair, the main consideration I have while bugging out has a lot more to do with lead and brass.
 

USAFRet

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I keep a 'bug out bag' in which has the physical written items I need to have of import and also keep a 2.5" enclosure with a backup of what I deem important with it. I update it about 3-4 times a year when I think about it.
To be fair, the main consideration I have while bugging out has a lot more to do with lead and brass.
Right. I also have that all on paper as well.
 

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