Question I was just wondering if my pc could handle one of the new 30 series graphics cards?

Dec 22, 2016
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Aug 26, 2021
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You will probably get a decent bottleneck from the ryzen 7 2700x but it probably won't matter terribly unless you plan on gaming at 4k. Nvidia recommends a 750w psu at the minimum for the 3080 and 3090, so you probably shouldn't go for the higher end cards. In my opinion you should get a 3060-70 taking the psu limits into account.
 
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Phaaze88

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I believe the power supply is 600W if that helps as well
Make and model matter for what is the most important part of the PC.
Quality > quantity. 600w psu doesn't say anything about the unit's quality. That's where make and model come in.

Although, even without knowing that info, I'd hazard a guess that you probably shouldn't do higher than a 3060 - maybe a 3060Ti - in there.
To try and keep it simple, the RTX 30 series' power efficiency is crapo compared to the last 2 generations, and is thus forcing some users to step up their psu choices.
A prebuilt like that is going to have a 'just good enough' psu for the original hardware.


Performance: It'll either improve - which will vary, if we're being broad - or not change at all. You shouldn't see reduced performance unless you screw up driver installs or something.
 
I will also emphasize the quality (make/model) of your power supply.. I'm also seeing on hardware performance videos where the Ryzen 7 2700X will limit performance at 1080p and even 1440p when paired with high-end RTX 3000 cards.. but, that really all depends on the game and settings used.

What resolution is your gaming monitor?
 

RTX 2080

Estimable
You will probably get a decent bottleneck from the ryzen 7 2700x but it probably won't matter terribly unless you plan on gaming at 4k.

"Bottlenecks," as they are most commonly refered to, occur when the CPU has a gaming load that is so high that the GPU cannot be fully utilized. CPU bottlenecks are the most likely to occur at lower resolutions such as 1080p because the load on the GPU is lower and the resultant higher refresh rates increases the load on the CPU. Going up in resolution to 1440p or 4K increases the load on the GPU, lowering your refresh rate and lowering the load on the CPU, removing the CPU bottleneck that would otherwise occur. Your statement that "bottleneck ... won't matter terribly unless you plan on gaming at 4k" is completely false. CPU bottlenecks matter the least at 4K, not the other way around.
 

Phaaze88

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Its a prebuilt so I wouldn't imagine it is very high quality.
Everything else pretty much stands then:
-Gpu options are limited with the current psu.
-Performance can go up, or not change at all, depending on several factors.


FYI, there's always a bottleneck limitation somewhere. It's not exclusive to the cpu, as it might appear to be at times.
 
Dec 22, 2016
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I will also emphasize the quality (make/model) of your power supply.. I'm also seeing on hardware performance videos where the Ryzen 7 2700X will limit performance at 1080p and even 1440p when paired with the RTX 3090. I didn't look at the other high-end cards, but I'd expect it to level off somewhere around the RTX 3070. I'll continue to look more into that.

What resolution is your gaming monitor?
Make and model matter for what is the most important part of the PC.
Quality > quantity. 600w psu doesn't say anything about the unit's quality. That's where make and model come in.

Although, even without knowing that info, I'd hazard a guess that you probably shouldn't do higher than a 3060 - maybe a 3060Ti - in there.
To try and keep it simple, the RTX 30 series' power efficiency is crapo compared to the last 2 generations, and is thus forcing some users to step up their psu choices.
A prebuilt like that is going to have a 'just good enough' psu for the original hardware.


Performance: It'll either improve - which will vary, if we're being broad - or not change at all. You shouldn't see reduced performance unless you screw up driver installs or something.
I guess I should have looked into my psu more before posting this but this is the exact one I have i should also mention I'm not trying to get anything crazy like a 3090. I just want something like a 3060 or 3060ti would be fine and if it's not recommended then should I just upgrade the psu? or would I still have problems with other parts of my build?
https://www.thermaltakeusa.com/smart-600w.html
 

RTX 2080

Estimable
I guess I should have looked into my psu more before posting this but this is the exact one I have i should also mention I'm not trying to get anything crazy like a 3090. I just want something like a 3060 or 3060ti would be fine and if it's not recommended then should I just upgrade the psu? or would I still have problems with other parts of my build?
https://www.thermaltakeusa.com/smart-600w.html
Nvidia conservatively recommends a 600 watt PSU for the RTX 3060 Ti, although its debatable whether that's really enough.

If you're gaming at 1080p, buy the RTX 3060. If you game at 1440p, buy the RTX 3060 Ti.

There is a high probability that in certain games and at certain graphical settings your frame rate will be limited by your Ryzen 2700.
 
Dec 22, 2016
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Thermaltake Smart... RIP.
Something like a RM650X or XPG Core Reactor 650, for example would be better.


Performance can go up(varies), or not change at all, depending on several factors, such as:
-in game settings per title
-resolution
-ram config
-storage config
-the game engine
I plan to primarily game on 1080p at 144hz (i care more about frames than resolution) and some vr gaming to
Nvidia conservatively recommends a 600 watt PSU for the RTX 3060 Ti, although its debatable whether that's really enough.

If you're gaming at 1080p, buy the RTX 3060. If you game at 1440p, buy the RTX 3060 Ti.

There is a high probability that in certain games and at certain graphical settings your frame rate will be limited by your Ryzen 2700.
I plan to primarily game at 1080p/144hz my current build can hit 144 (on certain games) but not consistently I would also like for my VR games to be playable at a higher resolution without my frame rates chugging would a 20 series be more suitable for what I want or should I just upgrade PSU's and go for the 30 series?
 

RTX 2080

Estimable
I plan to primarily game on 1080p at 144hz (i care more about frames than resolution) and some vr gaming to

I plan to primarily game at 1080p/144hz my current build can hit 144 (on certain games) but not consistently I would also like for my VR games to be playable at a higher resolution without my frame rates chugging would a 20 series be more suitable for what I want or should I just upgrade PSU's and go for the 30 series?
Just for next time, its best to mention stuff like this in your original post as it helps us to not have to speculate a whole bunch before we can get to helping you.

Considering that you want to game at high refresh rate 1080p as well as VR, you'll want a good GPU. You should upgrade your PSU to something like a Corsair RM750x and purchase a RTX 3060 Ti.

Buying an equivalent RTX 20-series GPU wont alleviate your power draw issue; the RTX 2070 Super (closest in performance to a RTX 3060 Ti) also requires a 650 watt PSU minimum and they both have similar power draws (~200 watts for the 3060 Ti & 215 watts for the 2070 Super, more if your overclock it). You should not buy a Turing-series GPU.

1080p high refresh rate gaming is hard on the CPU and your Ryzen 2700 is not very well suited to pushing high refresh rates; as you said, you have a hard time maintaining 144 fps on certain games. Upgrading to a RTX 3060 Ti will help you in VR gaming and in scenarios where yout old GPU was being run as hard as it could, but there will be plenty of scenarios where you will be CPU limited. If you want to unlock the full potential of a RTX 3060 Ti, want to hit 144 fps as much as possible, and want to avoid the possibility of CPU-induced stuttering, you should also upgrade your CPU to a Ryzen 5600x or Ryzen 5800x. Please do not be tempted to upgrade to a Ryzen 3000 series CPU; they suffer from many of the same high refresh-rate performance issues as the Ryzen 2000 series.
 
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Aug 26, 2021
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"Bottlenecks," as they are most commonly refered to, occur when the CPU has a gaming load that is so high that the GPU cannot be fully utilized. CPU bottlenecks are the most likely to occur at lower resolutions such as 1080p because the load on the GPU is lower and the resultant higher refresh rates increases the load on the CPU. Going up in resolution to 1440p or 4K increases the load on the GPU, lowering your refresh rate and lowering the load on the CPU, removing the CPU bottleneck that would otherwise occur. Your statement that "bottleneck ... won't matter terribly unless you plan on gaming at 4k" is completely false. CPU bottlenecks matter the least at 4K, not the other way around.
I was using the term "bottle neck" as a blanket term for a part limiting the rest of the build due to power imbalances, in this case getting a high end 3000 series card would require a stronger cpu to take full advantage of its capabilities as well as a psu upgrade to make it functional. No need to get caught up in technicalities.
 
The PSU will be a factor I think. I've got an RX 6600xt. My power supply, although older, is a 750 watt PowerSpec Bronze unit. I've used a Vega 56, a 1660 Super, a GTX 1070 and a few other gpus on this unit. However, the RX 6600xt seems to be pretty taxing to that power supply. So I bought a Corsair RM850x. That will get installed this weekend and hopefully will help.
 

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