[SOLVED] i3-2100 Always running at 100C

Jul 26, 2021
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So I built a new pc yesterday;
Specs:
i3-2100
8GB Ram
Gigabyte GT 1030
450W Corsair PSU
Intel Stock Cooler
But I've noticed something that is that the CPU is ALWAYS running at 100C and max 102C Idle and in load
But I've also noticed that the Cooler is like weird, I don't know if what's on the cooler are scratches or something else but I don't know if that has to do with anything (I'll post a picture If someone asks me to)
So could someone help me to find the suspect?
Notes: Processor and Cooler are used but everything else is new, I've re-applied thermal paste in X, Dot and line patterns and nothing changed.
(Sorry for my grammar I don't speak english that well)
 

uWebb429

Notable
May 22, 2020
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What monitoring software are you using? Use HWiNFO to report the CPU core temperatures.

When attaching the stock cooler to the motherboard, it is best to push two mounting pins into the motherboard at the same time. Do this diagonally. When you only press one pin at a time, you can run into a situation where the final pin does not go all the way into the motherboard. The heatsink will look like it is properly attached when it is not. I once had a Gigabyte motherboard with this problem.

With some motherboards, it is best to install the Intel heatsink with the motherboard outside of the case. This way you can look at the back side of the motherboard to visually confirm that all 4 mounting pins are fully seated. With some cases, it might be possible to see the back side of the motherboard when the motherboard is mounted in the case.
 
Jul 26, 2021
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I would expect the cooler is not making proper contact with the CPU. Ensure it is properly seated on the CPU. Also, ensure the CPU fan is working. With that cooler I believe the dot method works best.
Yes the cooler fan is working And I tried the dot method again and it made no difference
What monitoring software are you using? Use HWiNFO to report the CPU core temperatures.

When attaching the stock cooler to the motherboard, it is best to push two mounting pins into the motherboard at the same time. Do this diagonally. When you only press one pin at a time, you can run into a situation where the final pin does not go all the way into the motherboard. The heatsink will look like it is properly attached when it is not. I once had a Gigabyte motherboard with this problem.

With some motherboards, it is best to install the Intel heatsink with the motherboard outside of the case. This way you can look at the back side of the motherboard to visually confirm that all 4 mounting pins are fully seated. With some cases, it might be possible to see the back side of the motherboard when the motherboard is mounted in the case.
Yes I use HWiNFO and HWMonitor
Btw, One clip isn't going in the slot (its not clicking) Does that make a difference?
(The clip that is not going in is the up left clip)
 

geofelt

Titan
Yes the cooler fan is working And I tried the dot method again and it made no difference

I doubt you are actually at 100c or more. The cpu throttle point is around 100c.
But, sensors are not completely accurate.

Yes I use HWiNFO and HWMonitor
Btw, One clip isn't going in the slot (its not clicking) Does that make a difference?
(The clip that is not going in is the up left clip)
One missing clip makes a HUGE difference on a stock intel cooler mount.

Here is my canned text on that:
----------------how to mount the stock Intel cooler--------------

The stock Intel cooler can be tricky to install.
A poor installation will result in higher cpu temperatures.
If properly mounted, you should expect temperatures at idle to be 10-15c. over ambient.

To mount the Intel stock cooler properly, place the motherboard on top of the foam or cardboard backing that was packed with the motherboard.
The stock cooler will come with paste pre applied, it looks like three grey strips.
The 4 push pins should come in the proper position for installation, that is with the pins rotated in the opposite direction of the arrow,(clockwise)
and pulled up as far as they can go.
Take the time to play with the pushpin mechanism until you know how they work.
Orient the 4 pins so that they are exactly over the motherboard holes.
If one is out of place, you will damage the pins which are delicate.
Push down on a DIAGONAL pair of pins at the same time. Then the other pair.
When you push down on the top black pins, it expands the white plastic pins to fix the cooler in place.
If you do them one at a time, you will not get the cooler on straight.
Lastly, look at the back of the motherboard to verify that all 4 pins are equally through the motherboard, and that the cooler is on firmly.
This last step must be done, which is why the motherboard should be out of the case to do the job. Or you need a case with a opening that lets you see the pins.
It is possible to mount the cooler with the motherboard mounted in the case, but you can then never be certain that the push pins are inserted properly
unless you can verify that the pins are through the motherboard and locked.

If you should need to remove the cooler, first run the cpu to heat it up and soften the paste before shutting down and powering off the pc. That makes it easy to unstick the old cooler.
Turn the pins counter clockwise to unlock them.
You will need to clean off the old paste and reapply new if you ever take the cooler off.
Clean off old paste with alcohol and a lint free paper like a coffee filter.
Apply new paste sparingly. A small rice sized drop in the center will spread our under heat and pressure.

It is hard to use too little.
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Jul 26, 2021
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Ok, So since everyone is telling me that the 1 clip that isn't clipping in the motherboard makes a difference I will replace the cooler and will post a update when it arrives
 
Jul 26, 2021
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Update: The cooler arrived, I installed it and the temperatures went down from 100C to 65C (On load) Thanks to everyone that helped in this thread :)
 

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