Question I5-4460 + GTX 1060 3GB Bottleneck?

zak.littlechild

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Aug 11, 2018
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Just bought myself an EVGA GTX1060 3GB card and was wondering if this is going to cause a bottleneck in my system?

I5-4460
EVGA GTX1060 3GB
Asus Z-97P MB
8GB DDR3 RAM (1600MHz)
VS550 PSU

Many thanks in advance
 
Bottleneck will depend on the game and the settings you choose. There are games where your cpu won’t hold 60fps regardless of gpu choice. At 1080p a 1060 3gb can happily do 60fps in all games if you are careful with game settings.

Every system will bottleneck in certain circumstances.
 
I think your plans are good.

What was your old card?
You will soon have the wherewithal to see for yourself how well the GTX1060 performs.
If the new card is an upgrade to the old, you will do better, particularly in fast action games.

On your future cpu upgrade,
The big value in a i5-4690K is that it can be overclocked giving a 25% boost in single thread performance.
That is what most games need.
I think that would be entirely appropriate for your new card and perhaps for even a stronger one. No doubt the 8 threads of a 4790K would be better, but by how much?
a i5-4690K sells for $70 on ebay. A i7-4790k for $190
Most games do just fine with 4 threads.
Here is an older study on that issue.

As to the PSU, I would not change it out unless you were having some issues.
It is plenty strong enough for even stronger graphics cards.
 
Last edited:

zak.littlechild

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Aug 11, 2018
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I think your plans are good.

What was your old card?
You will soon have the wherewithal to see for yourself how well the GTX1060 performs.
If the new card is an upgrade to the old, you will do better, particularly in fast action games.

On your future cpu upgrade,
The big value in a i5-4690K is that it can be overclocked giving a 25% boost in single thread performance.
That is what most games need.
I think that would be entirely appropriate for your new card and perhaps for even a stronger one. No doubt the 8 threads of a 4790K would be better, but by how much?
a i5-4690K sells for $70 on ebay. A i7-4790k for $190
Most games do just fine with 4 threads.
Here is an older study on that issue.

As to the PSU, I would not change it out unless you were having some issues.
It is plenty strong enough for even stronger graphics cards.
Hey Geofelt sorry for the late reply, I have upgraded from a GTX950 SC+ 2GB - and in reguards to the i5-4690k only upgrading to that as it has been offered to me F.O.C by a good friend :D maybe in the future I will look into securing a i7, or maybe just going all out on a more modern MB and get a newer CPU, Reguarding the OC - not a clue how to do that haha
 

zak.littlechild

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Aug 11, 2018
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Also, since having it in my system for a day now I have noticed that a lot of games are indeed performing a lot better, however, I never had a problem with WoW before, but now I'm getting random freeze frames and the occasional spike in FPS
 
Your 4460 has a standard clock rate of 3.2 with a turbo of 3.4.
Turbo applies to a single core when temperatures and workload permits.

On a i5-4690K upgrade, that changes to 3.5 with a turbo of 3.9. A 10% boost.

But, a 4690K can be overclocked. How high is determined by your luck in having a good chip as well as having a decent aftermarket cooler.
A simple tower type cooler with a 120mm fan is ok.
CM hyper212 is cheap and popular, but I found one nasty to install properly.
Noctua makes very good coolers that are easy to install.

You may hear about 4.9 overclocks, but those come from good chips and possibly dangerous voltage levels.
Those with poor chips will be silent.
Still, you might expect something in the 4.2 range on all cores.

You do this simply in the bios by gradually raising the all core multiplier from the default 35 to a higher number. leave all voltages on auto.
Stress test and see how you do.
Monitor the temperature and vcore voltage.
On a stress test, 85c. is about your limit, and vcore might be 1.3v(double check this, since I can't recall the number)
There are more comprehensive tweaks if you read some 4690K overclocking guides.
 

zak.littlechild

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Aug 11, 2018
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Your 4460 has a standard clock rate of 3.2 with a turbo of 3.4.
Turbo applies to a single core when temperatures and workload permits.

On a i5-4690K upgrade, that changes to 3.5 with a turbo of 3.9. A 10% boost.

But, a 4690K can be overclocked. How high is determined by your luck in having a good chip as well as having a decent aftermarket cooler.
A simple tower type cooler with a 120mm fan is ok.
CM hyper212 is cheap and popular, but I found one nasty to install properly.
Noctua makes very good coolers that are easy to install.

You may hear about 4.9 overclocks, but those come from good chips and possibly dangerous voltage levels.
Those with poor chips will be silent.
Still, you might expect something in the 4.2 range on all cores.

You do this simply in the bios by gradually raising the all core multiplier from the default 35 to a higher number. leave all voltages on auto.
Stress test and see how you do.
Monitor the temperature and vcore voltage.
On a stress test, 85c. is about your limit, and vcore might be 1.3v(double check this, since I can't recall the number)
There are more comprehensive tweaks if you read some 4690K overclocking guides.
Deffo something to look into, my CPU cooler is a Be Quiet! PURE Rock with 2 120mm fans on, so if that is permitting it might be worth looking into overclocking even if it is just a minor boost (im very paranoid so even up to 3.6 would be a bonus in my eyes ^^)
 
Your cooler is a good one.
The highest overclock will be limited either by the max temperature or the vcore you will tolerate.

Do not worry about high temperatures.
The processor will slow down or shut off if it detects a dangerous temperature.
That is around 100c.
Monitor your stress test with something like HWmonitor.

As one increases the multiplier, additional voltage is needed to insure stability.
Leaving voltage on auto will do a reasonable job of that.
If I recall, the max intel spec is 1.5v, but you don't want to go anywhere near that.
1.3v would be about your maximum.
You can monitor your vcore with cpu-Z.

As to stress test, I might keep it simple and use the stress test option on cpu-Z.
Others like prime95 or intel burn are not so realistic of your daily usage. OCCT is another good one.

When you find your comfortable limit, back off a notch and be done with it.
 

zak.littlechild

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Aug 11, 2018
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Your cooler is a good one.
The highest overclock will be limited either by the max temperature or the vcore you will tolerate.

Do not worry about high temperatures.
The processor will slow down or shut off if it detects a dangerous temperature.
That is around 100c.
Monitor your stress test with something like HWmonitor.

As one increases the multiplier, additional voltage is needed to insure stability.
Leaving voltage on auto will do a reasonable job of that.
If I recall, the max intel spec is 1.5v, but you don't want to go anywhere near that.
1.3v would be about your maximum.
You can monitor your vcore with cpu-Z.

As to stress test, I might keep it simple and use the stress test option on cpu-Z.
Others like prime95 or intel burn are not so realistic of your daily usage. OCCT is another good one.

When you find your comfortable limit, back off a notch and be done with it.
Does the stress test end or do I let it run or like 30 mins and stop it myself? CPU is in now just not sure what to do and what benchmarks im looking for tbh
 
A stress test will usually run until you stop it or you get a failure.
If you are obsessive about it, you can let a stress test run for a day.
As a more practical matter, let the test run long enough for the temperature to stabilize at it's max point.
That probably takes 15 minutes.

Normal operations will not be as stressful as a stress test.
If you later find that you get a failure during normal operations or gaming, then, perhaps it is time to back off your overclock a notch.
If what you do is critical, test more thoroughly.
A failure in a game may not be critical and you can restart from the last checkpoint.
 

zak.littlechild

Prominent
Aug 11, 2018
16
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510
0
A stress test will usually run until you stop it or you get a failure.
If you are obsessive about it, you can let a stress test run for a day.
As a more practical matter, let the test run long enough for the temperature to stabilize at it's max point.
That probably takes 15 minutes.

Normal operations will not be as stressful as a stress test.
If you later find that you get a failure during normal operations or gaming, then, perhaps it is time to back off your overclock a notch.
If what you do is critical, test more thoroughly.
A failure in a game may not be critical and you can restart from the last checkpoint.
Awesome thanks alot ^^, not started the OC'ing yet, but after 20 mins was sat at 50c for CPU temps
 

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