[SOLVED] i5 failure on my MX Linux Desktop

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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yep, that's pretty typical once a chipset family or socket goes out of production for a few years. Those who have them know that for many people 210.00 is a better option than a whole new platform so they stockpile a few of them until down the road when they become hard to find and jack the prices up. And if you add to that with the fact that a lot of hardware has been in short supply because of Covid related worker shortages in China and other countries, plus the rampant cost of gas boosting the problems with inflation, it's a nearly perfect storm.

Those pins don't look, upon casual inspection anyhow, TERRIBLY bent, so you might be able to very gently bend them back in place. It's a crapshoot though. A lot of times they will just break off beneath the surface of the socket anyhow. Or you also stand the risk of not getting it right and damaging the CPU by putting it back in.

There ARE a few other choices though, that aren't nearly as expensive.

https://pcpartpicker.com/products/motherboard/#f=8&sort=price&page=1
 

stackman1

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Yep, that's pretty typical once a chipset family or socket goes out of production for a few years. Those who have them know that for many people 210.00 is a better option than a whole new platform so they stockpile a few of them until down the road when they become hard to find and jack the prices up. And if you add to that with the fact that a lot of hardware has been in short supply because of Covid related worker shortages in China and other countries, plus the rampant cost of gas boosting the problems with inflation, it's a nearly perfect storm.

Those pins don't look, upon casual inspection anyhow, TERRIBLY bent, so you might be able to very gently bend them back in place. It's a crapshoot though. A lot of times they will just break off beneath the surface of the socket anyhow. Or you also stand the risk of not getting it right and damaging the CPU by putting it back in.

There ARE a few other choices though, that aren't nearly as expensive.

https://pcpartpicker.com/products/motherboard/#f=8&sort=price&page=1
Hey Dark.
I contacted Asrock to see if they would look at the pins.
A tech agreed so I sent him the pic below which he edited (as you will see).
Here is what he relayed, in his reply:

Bent pins occurred when you install or remove the cpu and is not cover under warranty , ASRock considered physical damage
This is picture #3 you have sent and shows severe damage


I wasn't expecting anything more. Just glad they verified status, like you did.
I''m at the library so I can't save the pic. Will forward when I get home.

I no doubt bent the pins.
I re-seated my processor way too many times and this particular mobo has a 'levered locking arm' on the cpu.
It's junky, it has play. And it makes me wonder if, when depressing the lever, I was doing a bit more than locking down chips.

Thanks for the PC Part Picker link. I was on yesterday to see what boards were compatible with my processor.
One of the things that I have realized is that I have of horsepower
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So, ALL CPUs have a locking lever arm and have for many, many moons. The thing you have to do is make absolutely certain that you have lined up the alignment markings correctly, and with the locking arm COMPLETELY OPEN gently place the CPU into the socket. Then, with very light but semi-firm pressure, using one finger, keep the CPU held down in place while with the other hand you lock down the retention arm. CPUs can move while that arm is being locked down and when they do it doesn't take much for pins to bend.

Keeping light pressure with one finger on top of the CPU while locking it down will stop that from happening, but it is VERY important to make sure from the start that you have the CPU oriented and aligned correctly to the socket.
 

stackman1

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Thanks for the advice on seating the cpu.
Bending pins is what I am most worried about with the next board.

Here is the modified pic from Asrock tech:

 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yeah, the only way I can see THAT MANY pins getting bent is by inserting the CPU wrong or not having it fully seated and sitting flat before trying to push the retention arm down. Or, some other activity near the socket before the CPU was installed.
 

stackman1

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Just put in an order to purchase what looks to be the next version of the original board.
ASROCK H510M-ITX/ac

Seating/Locking down my cpu properly will be my focus. Only want to do it once!
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Good deal. Yes, it's not rocket science, once you know how to do it properly, but I've even seen some veteran builders brain fart and bork a board by bending up the pins so don't feel too terrible. If you are very conscientious with what you are doing and take your time, you will never do it again. I have never done it myself but I have come close to ALMOST doing it by trying to go too fast.
 

stackman1

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I just received my new motherboard AsrockH510M-ITX/ac. It is a mini board ~ 6" x 6" - just like the last one (B410M-ITX/ac). With any luck I won't being crushing pins like I did the last time. I will be using the replacement i5 that Intel sent............please god........using my Raspberry Pi with 1gb is killing me. ;)

I think the new board cost ~ $150.
 

stackman1

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I realize I am extra spooked by my first misstep but I see no markings on my H510M socket that instruct me where to line up my i5 triangle.
My i5 cpu has 3 dots on three corners and one triangle on the fourth corner.

Does anyone see the orienting socket marking in the photos above (from my previous B460M).
Admittedly, I am old and my sight isn't the best.

Any thoughts greatly appreciated.

Peter
 

stackman1

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I realize I am extra spooked by my first misstep but I see no markings on my H510M socket that instruct me where to line up my i5 triangle.
My i5 cpu has 3 dots on three corners and one triangle on the fourth corner.

Does anyone see the orienting socket marking in the photos above (from my previous B460M).
Admittedly, I am old and my sight isn't the best.

Any thoughts greatly appreciated.

Peter
The socket cover appeared to have a triangle. I installed the processor and swung the lever to secure the i5 in the socket. There was tension moving the lever but I trust that should be expected.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Some tension? Yes. LOTS of tension? No. And there is absolutely an alignment mark on the motherboard itself. For Intel LGA 1200 sockets, which is what H510 boards have (And the majority of Intel sockets have), there is always either a triangle, or circle, or something in the left hand corner opposite of the latch mechanism as seen here. I can't really recall the last time it was different.

 

stackman1

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Well, connected all the wiring and double-checked everything. And happy to say, it booted up very quickly. I still have the motherboard out of the case. It is currently sitting on top of the cardboard box the board came in. So far so good.

As to the triangle business, the two Asrock motherboards did not have a triangle on the processor socket (as you can see in my earlier photos) however, I did see the triangle on the removable socket cover. And it would appear that I oriented the cpu correctly.

Thanks for all the help and inspiration. Hopefully I will be closing this forum entry shortly?

Peter
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Can't tell on the earlier photo because the mark is on the board, not the socket, and your pic only shows the socket. Never seen ANY motherboard that did not have an alignment marker nor a CPU without one. Not in memory anyhow. Either way, sounds like you got it sorted and that's all that really matters. Fingers crossed and best of luck to you stackman.
 

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