[SOLVED] I7 11700k idle temp really high

UserTom

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Hi,

I've just finished building my new pc so it is new
Everything seems to be working fine except for the fact that my ram is stuck at 2100mhz instead of 3200mhz and my idle cpu temp (from hwmonitor) was like 92c so I shut down the pc and I am looking for a solution before booting up again

I have a 240mm galahad aio cooler, it is mounted on the top, my tubes go down. The 2 fans on top are indeed spinning, I did apply thermal paste. In fact all my fans are working and my gpu is low temp. I did notice the fans were abnormally loud, like stuck at 100% power or something. I believe when I first booted up it was quiet.

Please help
 

Phaaze88

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So i'm guessing it's better to leave it at 100% to get more years out of it?
Yes, but not for that reason. Longevity isn't really a hybrid cooler's strong suit. They will fail, it's just a matter of when. 3-4 years is about the average run for 'em.
If the pump does not fail on its own(mechanical):
-galvanic corrosion: copper cold plate + aluminum radiator. Inhibitors are present in the fluid, but they have an expiration date.
-biological: gunk/sludge begin to form after the biocides expire, leading to clogging.
^then those will claim it.

Are you saying this as in: If the pump dies of usage then it'll fry up my CPU?
Oh heavens no.
The system will throw you temperature warnings at POST and the cpu will throttle frequency and voltage for protection - it'll even shut the PC off if the situation does not improve after a few minutes.
So no, you aren't completely in the dark being unable to monitor the pump speed.

Maybe faulty header?
That one, I don't know. The PWM/DC voltage signals I don't have a solid grasp on - that's why I tried to hail someone who does.
I've only installed 2 models so far. I followed what was in their manuals, and they never gave me any trouble.
 

UserTom

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Check the pump (insure it's connected and running) & make sure there's no trapped air in the waterblock.

Otherwise post up you full system specs with make and model#'s of the various part please.
Sorry this is my first time having an AIO cooler, how can I make sure its running, because I do see the radiator fan, and how do I see trapped air in waterblock?
I rebooted my computer, I am on it right now and my CPU is at 29c browsing google chrome and for some reason my RAM has gone to 3200mhz.
Is something wrong with my computer? I was at 92c earlier in the bios, and now i am at 29c browsing internet?

Specs:
LIAN LI LANCOOL II MESH RGB BLACK Tempered Glass ATX Case - Black Color - LANCOOL II MESH RGB-X
GIGABYTE Z590 AORUS ELITE AX LGA 1200 Intel Z590 ATX Motherboard with Triple M.2, PCIe 4.0, USB 3.2 Gen2X2 Type-C, Intel ...
CORSAIR RM Series RM850 CP-9020196-NA 850W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Full Modular ...
SAMSUNG 980 PRO M.2 2280 1TB PCI-Express Gen 4.0 x4, NVMe 1.3 Samsung V-NAND Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) ...
CORSAIR Vengeance RGB Pro SL 32GB (2 x 16GB) 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) Intel XMP 2.0 Desktop Memory Model ...
Intel Core i7-11700K Rocket Lake 8-Core 3.6 GHz LGA 1200 125W BX8070811700K Desktop Processor Intel UHD Graphics 750
LIAN LI GALAHAD AIO240 RGB BLACK, Dual 120mm Addressable RGB Fans AIO CPU Liquid Cooler
 

UserTom

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can you check on your bios if you can see pump RPM?
Yes I can see the pump RPM

Yesterday it fixed itself randomly
Then today I unplugged pc to do some cable management and when I plugged it back in I had the same issue
I looked and I have all my fans connected

When this happens I also get an error in my bios like "failed to load best settings"
-apply best setting and boot
-apply best setting and reboot
 

UserTom

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Since it wouldn't work or atleast work consistently, I plugged the AIO pump in a sata cable straight into PSU and right now my CPU temperature in the bios are stable at 32c.

But now I cannot control the speed of the pump or see if it works. It seems to be working because of my temps but idk if it's at 50% 75% running at 100%

Anyone have any tips tricks or advice they can give me?

I have a galahad 240mm AIO
 

evyosh

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okay... gotcha... Does your motherboard come with a dedicated Pump Header? I tried to check but I couldn't find any results... instead of the Pump Header Can you plug it directly into the CPU Fan header. When I had my Corsair H115i I had to plug it into the CPU Fan Header instead of the pump header for some reason... or you can plug the pump to CPU_Opt and Radiator Fans to CPU_ Fans
 
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UserTom

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okay... gotcha... Does your motherboard come with a dedicated Pump Header? I tried to check but I couldn't find any results... instead of the Pump Header Can you plug it directly into the CPU Fan header. When I had my Corsair H115i I had to plug it into the CPU Fan Header instead of the pump header for some reason... or you can plug the pump to CPU_Opt and Radiator Fans to CPU_ Fans
I think it does, i think it is SYS_FAN3_PUMP, that would be it i think and it was plugged there when it wasn't working. I'd have to rehook all my cables to what you mention to see if it would work, I wonder what the difference between CPU_Opt and CPU_Fans are if they are doing the same job
 

Phaaze88

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According to the mobo spec page, there's 6 hybrid(PWM & DC) fan headers, all rated for 2 Amps, so it should not matter at all which header you plug it in...

Since the pump power uses a 3pin cable, did you set that header to DC Mode in the bios?
 

UserTom

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According to the mobo spec page, there's 6 hybrid(PWM & DC) fan headers, all rated for 2 Amps, so it should not matter at all which header you plug it in...

Since the pump power uses a 3pin cable, did you set that header to DC Mode in the bios?
Yes, I also tried that while I was still plugged into that SYS_FAN3_PUMP but having that hot CPU made it lag and hard to boot and sometimes failed to boot and it would bring me back to the bios with the failed to use said settings, load a default setting?
 

UserTom

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It is running extremely quiet, sometimes I am afraid all my fans are disconnected, I have to stick my head in to hear something, so if the pump is at 100% it is inaudible
 

UserTom

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On another note, I've seen comments where people say to keep the pump at 100% and set the radiator fan dictate their RPM based on CPU temps (in CPU_FAN in the mobo)

If that is correct, I personally don't mind having the pump into a sata in the PSU (If it is a problem then I will address it)
 

Phaaze88

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Yes.
Running a static speed is easier on the pump's motor than letting it adjust dynamically.
It's fine to have just the fans change dynamically. Having both the pump and fans do it is just less effective overall and leads to wider temperature swings.

The pumps in hybrid coolers already aren't very strong; the flow rate is low. Max speed leads to smaller temperature swings.

You already found out that the pumps are fairly inaudible even at max speed.


The only real downside of pump using SATA power is that you can't monitor it. Like that, it should already be running DC at 100%.


The pumps will die eventually, there's no helping that. If it doesn't die due to mechanical failure, then it will die to either chemical or biological failure.
 

UserTom

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Running a static speed is easier on the pump's motor than letting it adjust dynamically.
So i'm guessing it's better to leave it at 100% to get more years out of it?


The only real downside of pump using SATA power is that you can't monitor it
Are you saying this as in: If the pump dies of usage then it'll fry up my CPU?


And then, judging by your answer, it's better to leave it at 100% and plugging it into PSU should run it in DC at 100% which will help with the pump longevity. Basically it's fine to keep it as such if I'm fine with not being able to monitor it in bios or whatever. I monitor my fans and temps using HWMonitor and it's obvious if the pump has a failure.

According to the mobo spec page, there's 6 hybrid(PWM & DC) fan headers, all rated for 2 Amps
Also this is a good information to know, I was planning on buying more fans and chain fan connectors or idk how they are called in english. Then I will play around with the different headers in the motherboard. Maybe faulty header?

Should I consider this solved then
 

Phaaze88

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So i'm guessing it's better to leave it at 100% to get more years out of it?
Yes, but not for that reason. Longevity isn't really a hybrid cooler's strong suit. They will fail, it's just a matter of when. 3-4 years is about the average run for 'em.
If the pump does not fail on its own(mechanical):
-galvanic corrosion: copper cold plate + aluminum radiator. Inhibitors are present in the fluid, but they have an expiration date.
-biological: gunk/sludge begin to form after the biocides expire, leading to clogging.
^then those will claim it.

Are you saying this as in: If the pump dies of usage then it'll fry up my CPU?
Oh heavens no.
The system will throw you temperature warnings at POST and the cpu will throttle frequency and voltage for protection - it'll even shut the PC off if the situation does not improve after a few minutes.
So no, you aren't completely in the dark being unable to monitor the pump speed.

Maybe faulty header?
That one, I don't know. The PWM/DC voltage signals I don't have a solid grasp on - that's why I tried to hail someone who does.
I've only installed 2 models so far. I followed what was in their manuals, and they never gave me any trouble.
 

UserTom

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Thank you for all the answers you've given me. With that information I'll most likely be able to fix the ''problem'' once I decide to run the pump on the motherboard instead of a SATA cable. Hopefully I find out if the pump just doesn't want to work with this header and works with another one.

Thanks again.
 

Paperdoc

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The Tom's system alerted me to the post above by Phaze88, but I've been too busy to reply for a couple days. I can give you specific advice on connections and configuration. First some background.

The fan headers on a mobo have three major functions: (a) supply power to the fan; (b) control the fan speed so that a TEMPERATURE can be kept in a reasonable range; and (c) monitor the fan speed signal for FAILURE. The last one many people forget but it is important. Failure of a fan (no speed signal reaching the header) normally will trigger an error message on your screen so you are aware and can fix it. But for the CPU, such a failure COULD be catastrophic. The mobo and your OS have one protection system for this - they will slow the CPU speed ("throttle" it) if the CPU's internal temp gets above a limit, and further will shut your system done completely if it reaches a higher limit. But those are slow actions. On most mobos for failure of the fan on the CPU_FAN header specifically, the mobo itself will put a prominent screen error up immediately and, in a short time and without waiting for the CPU temp sensor to show actual high temps, may shut your system down quickly. Moreover, it may also NOT allow you to boot up if the CPU cooling fan does not show a proper speed right away.

When you use a AIO liquid-cooling system for your CPU (as you are doing, OP), the most important part of that for FAILURE monitoring is the PUMP operation. If the pump fails there is no fluid flow, and NO heat is being removed from the CPU, so its internal temperature could go VERY high quickly. If the pump is working but even ALL of the fans on the rad do not, the liquid loop temperature will rise slowly, and the other mobo / OS temperature limiting process will catch that before the temp gets too high.

OP, the Galahad AIO 240 system you have is designed to have the pump run full speed all the time, and let the CPU_FAN do its normal control system for the CPU chip's internal temperature by altering the speed of the rad fans. So we need to make connections for that according to what your mobo can do. See the Galahad manual on p.2, the "Cable Connection Guide". You have two connections o make for motors (we'll skip the lights for now). A THREE-pin connector from the PUMP is shown going to AIO_PUMP, and a FOUR-pin connection from the fans (a Splitter to feed two fans on the rad) to "4-pin PWM". On your mobo (see its manual p. 17), you have available a CPU_FAN and CPU_OPT header, three SYS_FAN headers for case ventilation fans, and a dual-purpose SYS_FAN4_PUMP header. The awkward part of this is that your manual, like nearly ALL others, does NOT tell us any details about how the FAILURE monitoring is done, and on which header(s). The only thing we CAN be sure of is that the special close monitoring WILL be done at the CPU_FAN header, and maybe others. We also know that for purposes of the fan SPEED control function, the CPU_OPT and CPU_FAN headers will do exactly the same thing.

Now we come to a quirk of the designs of fans that is used by most AIO systems including yours. The older 3-pin fans can have their speed controlled ONLY by varying the voltage supplied to the fan on Pin #2 (Pin #1 is Ground, and Pin #3 is the fan speed signal sent back to the header.) That Voltage can vary from 12 VDC for full speed down to about 5 VDC for minimum speed without danger of stalling. The new 4-pin PWM fans work differently. For them the Voltage on Pin #2 is always 12 VDC. Then the PWM signal fed via Pin #4 goes to a special chip inside the fan that uses the signal to modify the flow of current from that fixed power line though the windings to change fan speed. Now, if you plug a 3-pin fan into a header that is using the new 4-pin PWM Mode of electrical control signals, that fan always receives 12 VDC from Pin #2, and does not get the PWM signal it can't use, anyway, because it has no special chip. So it runs full speed all the time. The PUMP on your AIO system is wired just like an older 3-pin fan. Since we WANT it to run full speed always, it should be connected to a header that IS using the new PWM Mode. That way, no matter what speed the system may try to impose on the PUMP (via a PWM signal through Pin #4) the pump will still run full speed. Meanwhile, we also WANT to have the speed of the rad FANS determined by that CPU temperature control system, so those fans should be connected to the same electrical signal. BUT those fans ARE the 4-pin design that DO respond to the PWM control signal.

Now we can make the proper connections. Plug the PUMP's 4-pin connector into the CPU_FAN header - the one header we are SURE will monitor very closely its "fan" (really, the pump) for failure. Plug the two rad fans (using the Splitter) into the CPU_OPT header that is sending out the proper signals to control cooling of the CPU chip. You do NOT need to use the SYS_FAN4_PUMP header - we don't really know whether it will do failure monitoring the correct way for CPU protection. You will use the three SYS_FAN headers for case ventilation fans, and you even could use the SYS_FAN4_PUMP header for that, too.

Now to header configuration - see manual p. 26 for the Main Menu. Use F6 to get to the Smart Fan Menu (p. 27). At upper left you get to choose which header you are working on. For the CPU_FAN header, set Fan Speed Control to "Normal"; Fan Control Use Temperature to CPU (uou may NOT have this choice for this header - it may only use the CPU's internal sensor); Fan / Pump Control Mode to PWM so it does send out the PWM signal and hold Pin #2 to full 12 VDC; Fan / Pump Stop to DISabled (you never want it to stop!); Fan / Pump Fail Warning to Enabled. Now proceed to the CPU_OPT header and make the SAME settings. I see you can actually save a set of header configurations to a named file, but you do not need to. Your next step will be to make your current adjustments "permanent" until you come back to change them. Use the Esc key to get back to Main Menu, then the F10 key to get to the Exit Menu (p. 43). There choose Save & Exit Setup to save your settings and reboot.

This will ensure that your pump runs full speed all the time and is monitored closely for failure, and that the two rad fans will have their speeds adjusted automatically according to the temperature measured by a sensor inside the CPU chip.

Regarding case ventilation fans which you do not seem too worried about, I will assume for now that they are of the 4-pin variety. So you can go back into BIOS Setup to the Smart Fan system and configure the SYS_FAN headers you are using for those fans. Most settings are the same as above, with two exceptions. The Fan Control Use Temperature should be set to Motherboard. IF your case fans are 3-pin, set Fan / Pump Control Mode to Voltage. Remember to SAVE and Exit.

I suspect part of your problem was that you assumed, since the pump cable has 3 holes, you set its header to use Voltage Control Mode suited to 3-pin fans. BUT that would mean that the header would actually change the pump speed all the time as temperatures change, and at the SAME time the FANS' speeds would change, too, so that the two devices would chase each other around. Moreover, if you had connected the pump to the SYS_FAN4_PUMP header and left that to use the MOBO temperature sensor rather than the CPU sensor, the pump speed would have been guided by the cooler internal case temperature, not the CPU temp. That would surely push the pump to slow speeds at low to moderate workloads, and inadequate heat removal from the CPU chip.
 
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