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Question I7 3770 (non k) reaching 50c Idle

Jul 10, 2021
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My I7 3770 (non K) runs at 50C idle and motherboard around 36C - 38C. When playing titles like Prototype 2, Valorant CPU reaches 85C Max and around 82C Avg. I have not overclocked anything and everything is set to Auto in Bios. Room temp is around 35C daytime. I am using a Stock Cooler and want to under volt my CPU for better temps because i cannot buy a new aftermarket cooler right now.
My specifications are:
Motherboard: Asus TUF Sabertooth Z77
Processor: Intel Core I7 3770 3.40Ghz Ivy Bridge with Stock Cooler
GPU: Zotac GTX750ti 2GB
RAM: 4GB*2 Samsung 1600Mhz
Storage: 128GB Sandisk SATA SSD, 500GB WD Green hard drive
BIOS Version: 2104
Operating System: Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Case: Cooler Master Elite 310C (The one with a T Printed in front)
 
Last edited:

bccorrupt

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Apr 18, 2012
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Is this a recent issue, all of a sudden, or slowly getting worse issue? How long has it been since the thermal paste on the CPU has been replaced? What does your case cooling consist of(what case, what type, amount of, and placement of fans)?
 
Jul 10, 2021
7
0
10
0
Is this a recent issue, all of a sudden, or slowly getting worse issue? How long has it been since the thermal paste on the CPU has been replaced? What does your case cooling consist of(what case, what type, amount of, and placement of fans)?
I bought this System from a known one about 6 months ago and i used it for like a month or two without noticing the thermals. Then i got a POST error saying CPU Overtemperature. Then i started noticing thermals, and got these results. I replaced Thermal Paste 15 days ago i think, and also removed dust from the system. I don't think its getting worse, cause i am getting these temps consistently for about a month and a half i guess.

I have this case - https://mdcomputers.in/cooler-master-mid-tower-elite-310c-rc-310c-kkn3-u3.html . I have a preinstalled Cooler master exhaust at the back, and a small maybe 80MM fan as a intake in front.
 
You are not doing badly, considering a 35c. room temperature.

At one level, do not worry, your cpu will monitor it's own temperature and will slow down or even shut off if it detects a dangerous temperature.

50c. idle suggests to me that your cooler is mounted properly and functioning well.

Any cooler needs a good source of fresh air to let it do it's job.
A single 80mm fan as intake is not likely to do the job.
If the case permits, replace the front intake with a 120mm fan.
In the mean time, take the case covers off which will allow more fresh air to reach the cooler and graphics card.
A house fan directed at the innards will help more.

In case you want to remount the cooler, here is my stock instruction:

----------------how to mount the stock Intel cooler--------------

The stock Intel cooler can be tricky to install.
A poor installation will result in higher cpu temperatures.
If properly mounted, you should expect temperatures at idle to be 10-15c. over ambient.

To mount the Intel stock cooler properly, place the motherboard on top of the foam or cardboard backing that was packed with the motherboard.
The stock cooler will come with paste pre applied, it looks like three grey strips.
The 4 push pins should come in the proper position for installation, that is with the pins rotated in the opposite direction of the arrow,(clockwise)
and pulled up as far as they can go.
Take the time to play with the pushpin mechanism until you know how they work.
Orient the 4 pins so that they are exactly over the motherboard holes.
If one is out of place, you will damage the pins which are delicate.
Push down on a DIAGONAL pair of pins at the same time. Then the other pair.
When you push down on the top black pins, it expands the white plastic pins to fix the cooler in place.
If you do them one at a time, you will not get the cooler on straight.
Lastly, look at the back of the motherboard to verify that all 4 pins are equally through the motherboard, and that the cooler is on firmly.
This last step must be done, which is why the motherboard should be out of the case to do the job. Or you need a case with a opening that lets you see the pins.
It is possible to mount the cooler with the motherboard mounted in the case, but you can then never be certain that the push pins are inserted properly
unless you can verify that the pins are through the motherboard and locked.

If you should need to remove the cooler, first run the cpu to heat it up and soften the paste before shutting down and powering off the pc. That makes it easy to unstick the old cooler.
Turn the pins counter clockwise to unlock them.
You will need to clean off the old paste and reapply new if you ever take the cooler off.
Clean off old paste with alcohol and a lint free paper like a coffee filter.
Apply new paste sparingly. A small rice sized drop in the center will spread our under heat and pressure.
Too much paste is bad, it will act as an insulator.
It is hard to use too little.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Jul 10, 2021
7
0
10
0
I bought this System from a known one about 6 months ago and i used it for like a month or two without noticing the thermals. Then i got a POST error saying CPU Overtemperature. Then i started noticing thermals, and got these results. I replaced Thermal Paste 15 days ago i think, and also removed dust from the system. I don't think its getting worse, cause i am getting these temps consistently for about a month and a half i guess.

I have this case - https://mdcomputers.in/cooler-master-mid-tower-elite-310c-rc-310c-kkn3-u3.html . I have a preinstalled Cooler master exhaust at the back, and a small maybe 80MM fan as a intake in front.
I checked the Cooler and fans you suggested. I am from India, and the case fans are not available right now, i will try to purchase and install them as soon as possible. I was also thinking about the Side panel fans, that they should be intake or exhaust.
 
Jul 10, 2021
7
0
10
0
You are not doing badly, considering a 35c. room temperature.

At one level, do not worry, your cpu will monitor it's own temperature and will slow down or even shut off if it detects a dangerous temperature.

50c. idle suggests to me that your cooler is mounted properly and functioning well.

Any cooler needs a good source of fresh air to let it do it's job.
A single 80mm fan as intake is not likely to do the job.
If the case permits, replace the front intake with a 120mm fan.
In the mean time, take the case covers off which will allow more fresh air to reach the cooler and graphics card.
A house fan directed at the innards will help more.

In case you want to remount the cooler, here is my stock instruction:

----------------how to mount the stock Intel cooler--------------

The stock Intel cooler can be tricky to install.
A poor installation will result in higher cpu temperatures.
If properly mounted, you should expect temperatures at idle to be 10-15c. over ambient.

To mount the Intel stock cooler properly, place the motherboard on top of the foam or cardboard backing that was packed with the motherboard.
The stock cooler will come with paste pre applied, it looks like three grey strips.
The 4 push pins should come in the proper position for installation, that is with the pins rotated in the opposite direction of the arrow,(clockwise)
and pulled up as far as they can go.
Take the time to play with the pushpin mechanism until you know how they work.
Orient the 4 pins so that they are exactly over the motherboard holes.
If one is out of place, you will damage the pins which are delicate.
Push down on a DIAGONAL pair of pins at the same time. Then the other pair.
When you push down on the top black pins, it expands the white plastic pins to fix the cooler in place.
If you do them one at a time, you will not get the cooler on straight.
Lastly, look at the back of the motherboard to verify that all 4 pins are equally through the motherboard, and that the cooler is on firmly.
This last step must be done, which is why the motherboard should be out of the case to do the job. Or you need a case with a opening that lets you see the pins.
It is possible to mount the cooler with the motherboard mounted in the case, but you can then never be certain that the push pins are inserted properly
unless you can verify that the pins are through the motherboard and locked.

If you should need to remove the cooler, first run the cpu to heat it up and soften the paste before shutting down and powering off the pc. That makes it easy to unstick the old cooler.
Turn the pins counter clockwise to unlock them.
You will need to clean off the old paste and reapply new if you ever take the cooler off.
Clean off old paste with alcohol and a lint free paper like a coffee filter.
Apply new paste sparingly. A small rice sized drop in the center will spread our under heat and pressure.
Too much paste is bad, it will act as an insulator.
It is hard to use too little.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I really want this system to perform well for a year or 2, so please tell me these temps will not reduce my PC's lifespan.....And thanks for this guide, i will disassemble my system and will reinstall the cooler, and everything else as you said. And what are house fans? 😅
 
CPU longevity can be impacted by excessive voltage from overclocking.
Since your processor can not be overclocked, I see no need to worry.

Ah... the English language. A house fan, by my usage, i s a small portable fan that is used in a house for local cooling.
 
Jul 10, 2021
7
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10
0
CPU longevity can be impacted by excessive voltage from overclocking.
Since your processor can not be overclocked, I see no need to worry.

Ah... the English language. A house fan, by my usage, i s a small portable fan that is used in a house for local cooling.
Okay, got it!
I thought house fan as some kind fan that fits in the cabinet LMAO, my bad
 

bccorrupt

Distinguished
Apr 18, 2012
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Weird, the spec sheet clearly says

Front: 120mm fan x 1 (optional),
Rear: 120mm black fan x 1 (pre-installed),
Side: 80/90/120mm fan x 1 (optional)

but the picture shows 2 side fan slots. I would just leave the top one over the CPU empty, but you could fill it. From the picture it looks smaller though and the spec sheet doesn't list whether it's 80 or 90mm.
 
yeah got it, there is space for 2 fans in the side panel, both exhaust?
What counts is the volume of cooling airflow through the cpu cooler.
My thought is that the more you can increase the intake, the better you will cool.
Whatever comes in will eventually exit the case, taking component heat with it.

In the past, I have seen studies showing side intakes to be effective.

Another strategy, if you have only one place for a 120mm fan would be to buy a higher rpm fan which will provide more airflow. But, at the cost of more noise.

I would ignore 80mm fans which are not very useful; 92mm also.
 
Reactions: ItsKhushal
Jul 10, 2021
7
0
10
0
What counts is the volume of cooling airflow through the cpu cooler.
My thought is that the more you can increase the intake, the better you will cool.
Whatever comes in will eventually exit the case, taking component heat with it.

In the past, I have seen studies showing side intakes to be effective.

Another strategy, if you have only one place for a 120mm fan would be to buy a higher rpm fan which will provide more airflow. But, at the cost of more noise.

I would ignore 80mm fans which are not very useful; 92mm also.
Okay, thanks for helping me out!
 

dorsai

Distinguished
If funds are tight then simply remove the side panel and point a normal room fan into the interior of the case. The important thing is to improve airflow over the cpu area of the motherboard to expel heat away from the cpu.
 

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