Question I7 3770 to r7 2700x?

okjak808

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Hello everyone on Tomhardware Forums!

So I've recently found an R7 2700x for 180 dollars (Used), which IMO isn't bad to me. Currently I have an LGA 1155 platform with a i7 3770, which I do wanna upgrade soon since it's kind of outdated today. I tried opting for a i5 10400 on best buy which is in stock for 150 dollars at my local best buy, but LGA 1200 motherboards seems to be a bit pricey. Also I've been an intel user for 3 years now and I've never had an AMD cpu, I've always wanted to try an AMD cpu as well but never had the chance I guess.

Do you guys think it'll be worth it to upgrade from a R7 2700x from a 3770? I also tried looking at the R5 3600s but now days they're over 200 dollars.

Thank you for reading and your time, have a good day!
 

okjak808

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Yes, it would, a world of difference!
I see, well I just found a an AM4 motherboard from Asus which is the Asus ROG Strix B350-F, I checked for CPU comp and it appears to support the 2700x, I also learned that the x meaning that is supports overclocking correct? If so that would be a nice addition too, but I won't be overclocking.
 

iPeekYou

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I see, well I just found a an AM4 motherboard from Asus which is the Asus ROG Strix B350-F, I checked for CPU comp and it appears to support the 2700x, I also learned that the x meaning that is supports overclocking correct? If so that would be a nice addition too, but I won't be overclocking.
IIRC, the X suffix in Ryzen 2000 means that it supports PBO. Overclocking is supported on non X processors also. If you're not overclocking you can just enable PBO and enjoy the PC.
 
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okjak808

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IIRC, the X suffix in Ryzen 2000 means that it supports PBO. Overclocking is supported on non X processors also. If you're not overclocking you can just enable PBO and enjoy the PC.
Oh wow that's so cool so basically every AMD cpu is unlocked I never knew that! Compared to Intel's...

Anyways I thank you for the reply, also just to be sure, what do you think about the upgrade from my i7-3770 to a r7 2700x do you think it's worth it? I already found my ram, mobo, and the r7 with it all costing me 351 dollars, compared with the 10400 I mentioned earlier It would've went over 400. All of them are used which I'm fine with cause the parts I currently have were basically bought used.
 

iPeekYou

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Oh wow that's so cool so basically every AMD cpu is unlocked I never knew that! Compared to Intel's...

Anyways I thank you for the reply, also just to be sure, what do you think about the upgrade from my i7-3770 to a r7 2700x do you think it's worth it? I already found my ram, mobo, and the r7 with it all costing me 351 dollars, compared with the 10400 I mentioned earlier It would've went over 400. All of them are used which I'm fine with cause the parts I currently have were basically bought used.
Easily. Ivy Bridge was the wonder kid, still is, considering it's the grandpappy of modern Intel processors. It has ran its course, however, and Zen is the new cool kid on the block. I myself moved from 3570K to 3500X (3600 was 60-70$ more expensive here at the time) and got noticeably smoother gameplay with Far Cry 5. Did no benchmark so no numbers however. Unzipping files now got better as well, but expected out of 4c part to 6c part. Yours would do much better in multithreaded workloads.

Look at benchmarks of even the low-tier 3300X vs i7-7700K. One is a budget part while the other is high-end consumer processor. The 3300X hits so damn close in gaming to the 7700K, not to mention opening up possibility for processor upgrade without swapping motherboard. Yes, the Zen 2 is more powerful in single thread, but Zen+ is no slouch either. With modern software utilizing more and more cores, Zen+ platforms can still catch up somewhat to Zen 2, within reason (such as my 3500X, it can get left in the dust vs 2600 or 1600AF).

If anything, I'd advise getting a 5xx motherboard so you can potentially upgrade to Zen 3 down the line. 4 series compatibility depends on manufacturers, and 3 series is out of the question. Otherwise, 2700X is a worthy upgrade from 3770K.
 
I myself moved from 3570K to 3500X (3600 was 60-70$ more expensive here at the time) and got noticeably smoother gameplay with Far Cry 5. Did no benchmark so no numbers however.
I did an upgrade from 3570K to 3600 as I was getting poor performance with Far Cry 5. The scripted benchmark ran ok in terms of fps but actual in game play suffered from periods of large fps drops.
 

iPeekYou

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I did an upgrade from 3570K to 3600 as I was getting poor performance with Far Cry 5. The scripted benchmark ran ok in terms of fps but actual in game play suffered from periods of large fps drops.
That's weird, I was just replaying FC5 last night and it was silky smooth. Also had Vsync on though since I prefer bit input lag (not that it matters in the game) to screen tearing.
What power plan are you on? I assume temps are okay too.
 

punkncat

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OP, a few suggestions from a 2700X owner.

I would suggest using a 4xx chipset. Look at reviews and get one with good VRM. The danger you could run into with a 3xx chipset is BIOS update compatibility.

The 2700X is a 105W TDP. They run warm. Get a (better) cooler than stock. There isn't a whole lot of OC headroom as these are pretty well optimized by AMD's PBO. Case with good airflow is a plus.

RAM speed and timing is important. Find as fast and tight a timing as you can, and even better if it's on the QVL list for the motherboard you settle on.

The R5 3600(x) is faster and the non (x) can typically readily be OC to be faster as well. The 10400 is likely close enough in performance that you couldn't tell on desktop. I just picked up an 11600K and they are right with each other multithread, but the Intel is FAR faster on single thread loads than the 2700X.
 

okjak808

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OP, a few suggestions from a 2700X owner.

I would suggest using a 4xx chipset. Look at reviews and get one with good VRM. The danger you could run into with a 3xx chipset is BIOS update compatibility.

The 2700X is a 105W TDP. They run warm. Get a (better) cooler than stock. There isn't a whole lot of OC headroom as these are pretty well optimized by AMD's PBO. Case with good airflow is a plus.

RAM speed and timing is important. Find as fast and tight a timing as you can, and even better if it's on the QVL list for the motherboard you settle on.

The R5 3600(x) is faster and the non (x) can typically readily be OC to be faster as well. The 10400 is likely close enough in performance that you couldn't tell on desktop. I just picked up an 11600K and they are right with each other multithread, but the Intel is FAR faster on single thread loads than the 2700X.
Yes I did extra research on the 2700x, while I already have an AIO from cooler master Ml240 RGB v2. Although I'm thinking of getting this board from Asus ROG STRIX B550-F. Although I've heard that B550 chipsets don't support Gen 2 cpus, but I did another research seeing if anyone had this board working with a r7 2700x and it appears to be working fine for him.

The other board I've mentioned sold out, while the Asus one is from my local Best Buy

Video:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=reshwiqgXSI
 

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