Question I7-3770K Overclocking

Oct 10, 2018
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http://prntscr.com/ndqk84

Safe temps ? 88c
Safe Voltage ? 1.168v (increased voltage by 0.100 v)
Safe Ghz ? 4.5Ghz

This overclock will kill cpu faster ? I mean lifespan will be reduce ?
P.S prevous i was iverclocked it on 4Ghz without voltage increase temps was 70c

System:
CPU I7-3770K
GPU GTX 960
MOTHERBOARD P8Z68-V LX
COOLER Dark Rock 4 Pro
PSU Corsair RM 650x
 
Last edited:

Quarkzquarkz

Honorable
Sep 18, 2013
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10,965
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My god.. 1.68? You're just asking for a meltdown. 3770k achieves 4.5ghz oc air cooled at 1.275 volts ROUGHLY. Don't ever go beyond 1.3 on an Ivy Bridge. It's already hot as it is!
And please keep your CPU core temps below 90c. Even 80 makes me uncomfortable for long periods of time.

Set at a lower frequency as a baseline and go from there. I can't believe 1.68 even boots up like that. Good luck!
 
Oct 10, 2018
17
0
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My god.. 1.68? You're just asking for a meltdown. 3770k achieves 4.5ghz oc air cooled at 1.275 volts ROUGHLY. Don't ever go beyond 1.3 on an Ivy Bridge. It's already hot as it is!
And please keep your CPU core temps below 90c. Even 80 makes me uncomfortable for long periods of time.

Set at a lower frequency as a baseline and go from there. I can't believe 1.68 even boots up like that. Good luck!

Ops i Edited ... :D 1.168 NOT 1.68 :D

https://prnt.sc/ndqk84 Watch screenshot :)

This is gaming rig When gaming temps are about 60c :)
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
I7-3770K. Kraken x61. Prime95 v26.6 small fft torture. Gaming temp.
4.9GHz, 1.32v, 72°C, 56°C
4.6GHz, 1.208v, 68°C, 55°C
4.3GHz, 1.118v, 56°C, 53°C

Cpus have a hardware lifespan of over 20 years. You are good upto 1.4V, but that's pushing it. You'd need to be @ 1.4v or over to really be doing any damage, but with that voltage/OC you shouldn't be seeing temps that high on that cooler either. Might need to adjust fan curve or check airflow.
 
Oct 10, 2018
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I7-3770K. Kraken x61. Prime95 v26.6 small fft torture. Gaming temp.
4.9GHz, 1.32v, 72°C, 56°C
4.6GHz, 1.208v, 68°C, 55°C
4.3GHz, 1.118v, 56°C, 53°C

Cpus have a hardware lifespan of over 20 years. You are good upto 1.4V, but that's pushing it. You'd need to be @ 1.4v or over to really be doing any damage, but with that voltage/OC you shouldn't be seeing temps that high on that cooler either. Might need to adjust fan curve or check airflow.
small fft torture CPU temps 78c

Aida64 Stress fpu FPU 86c

my cooler somehow don't get that heat

http://prntscr.com/ndyq60 Airflow is super ! heat pipes don't even get hot . Just warm

http://prntscr.com/ndyqmu - I put thermal compound something similar like that

I think thermal paste is bad inside cpu...

What u guys think my vram wont overheat on 3.5Ghz CPU ? my motherboard don't have coolers on vrams ...

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Genuine-original-ARCTIC-MX-4-2g-8-5W-MK-Top-End-thermal-paste-Processor-cooling-paste/32334580126.html
I used this thermal paste ( Not from aliexpress)
 
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Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
MX-4 isn't bad at all, it's in the upper half of the list. So no worries there.

Paste is OK on cpu.

Not that much to worry about with the VRM's as long as they get at least a little air movement across that area. Asus uses high grade mosfets that'll take a lot of heat, but also, the heatsink isn't the main source of cooling, it's an addition. The main source is the ground plane in the motherboard itself, which is quite large, so as long as there's some breeze over the mobo in that area, you aren't pushing those mosfets that hard. 1.168v is chump change when you consider that those 3rd gen cpus often have stock voltages closer to 1.25v.
 
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CompuTronix

Judicious
Moderator
tegacius,

Overclocking is always limited by two factors; voltage and temperature. No two processors are identical; each is unique in voltage tolerance, thermal behavior and overclocking potential, which is often referred to as the "silicon lottery". As Core speed (MHz) is increased, Core voltage (Vcore) must also be increased to maintain stability. This increases Power consumption (Watts) which increases Core temperatures. Overclocked processors at higher Vcore might run more than 50% above rated TDP, so high TDP air or liquid cooling is crucial.

Overclocking should not be attempted with Vcore settings in “Auto” because BIOS will apply significantly more voltage than necessary to maintain stability, which increases Power and heat. We know that excessive heat over time damages electronics, so even when using manual Vcore settings, excessive Vcore and Core temperature may result in accelerated "Electromigration" - https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Electromigration

This prematurely erodes the traces and junctions within the processor's layers and nano-circuits, which will eventually result in blue-screen crashes that become increasingly frequent over time. As a rule, CPU's are more susceptible to Electromigration with each Die-shrink. However, the most notable exception is Intel's 14 nanometer Microarchitecture, where advances in FinFET transistor technology have improved voltage tolerance.

Here's the maximum recommended Core voltage per Microarchitecture from 14 to 65 nanometers since 2006:



Since your i7-3770K is a 3rd Generation 22 nanometer processor, I wouldn't exceed 1.3 Vcore.

When tweaking your processor near it's highest overclock, keep in mind that for an increase of 100 MHz, a corresponding increase of about 50 millivolts (0.050) is needed to maintain stability. If 70 millivolts (0.070) or more is needed for the next stable 100 MHz increase, it means your processor is overclocked beyond it's capability.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



Core temperatures increase and decrease with ambient temperature.

• What is your ambient (room) temperature?

With high-end cooling you might reach the Vcore limit before 85°C. With low-end cooling you’ll reach 85°C before the Vcore limit. Regardless, whichever limit you reach first is where you should stop.

Remember to keep overclocking in perspective. For example, the difference between 4.5 GHz and 4.6 Ghz is less than 2.3%, which has no noticeable impact on overall system performance. It simply isn’t worth pushing your processor beyond recommended Core voltage and Core temperature limits just to squeeze out another 100 MHz.

Beginners guide to overclocking your CPU - http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-3761568/beginners-guide-overclocking-cpu-explicit-testing-guidelines.html

CT 😎
 
Oct 10, 2018
17
0
20
1
tegacius,

Overclocking is always limited by two factors; voltage and temperature. No two processors are identical; each is unique in voltage tolerance, thermal behavior and overclocking potential, which is often referred to as the "silicon lottery". As Core speed (MHz) is increased, Core voltage (Vcore) must also be increased to maintain stability. This increases Power consumption (Watts) which increases Core temperatures. Overclocked processors at higher Vcore might run more than 50% above rated TDP, so high TDP air or liquid cooling is crucial.

Overclocking should not be attempted with Vcore settings in “Auto” because BIOS will apply significantly more voltage than necessary to maintain stability, which increases Power and heat. We know that excessive heat over time damages electronics, so even when using manual Vcore settings, excessive Vcore and Core temperature may result in accelerated "Electromigration" - https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Electromigration

This prematurely erodes the traces and junctions within the processor's layers and nano-circuits, which will eventually result in blue-screen crashes that become increasingly frequent over time. As a rule, CPU's are more susceptible to Electromigration with each Die-shrink. However, the most notable exception is Intel's 14 nanometer Microarchitecture, where advances in FinFET transistor technology have improved voltage tolerance.

Here's the maximum recommended Core voltage per Microarchitecture from 14 to 65 nanometers since 2006:



Since your i7-3770K is a 3rd Generation 22 nanometer processor, I wouldn't exceed 1.3 Vcore.

When tweaking your processor near it's highest overclock, keep in mind that for an increase of 100 MHz, a corresponding increase of about 50 millivolts (0.050) is needed to maintain stability. If 70 millivolts (0.070) or more is needed for the next stable 100 MHz increase, it means your processor is overclocked beyond it's capability.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



Core temperatures increase and decrease with ambient temperature.

• What is your ambient (room) temperature?

With high-end cooling you might reach the Vcore limit before 85°C. With low-end cooling you’ll reach 85°C before the Vcore limit. Regardless, whichever limit you reach first is where you should stop.

Remember to keep overclocking in perspective. For example, the difference between 4.5 GHz and 4.6 Ghz is less than 2.3%, which has no noticeable impact on overall system performance. It simply isn’t worth pushing your processor beyond recommended Core voltage and Core temperature limits just to squeeze out another 100 MHz.

Beginners guide to overclocking your CPU - http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-3761568/beginners-guide-overclocking-cpu-explicit-testing-guidelines.html

CT 😎
Rainbow six siege crashes if I play on 144fps ( 144hz monitor ) , when i play on 100fps it dont crash but my previous I5-3350p was able to maintain 100fps ... I bought this used cpu only for 144hz on rainbow six siege and I can't do that :(((((( I think cause cpu overheat or crash on 4.5 ghz I don't know why .. :/ I use Dark Rock 4 Pro and cpu is so hot ! why ? ;/ maybe I need to change thermal paste to liquid metal inside cpu....
on 4 ghz 1.1 voltage max temps is 72c (aida 64 stress fpu)
on 4.5 ghz 1.2 voltage max temps is 85c (aida 64 stress fpu)
Can it be that it dosent matter I use 4 or 4.5 ghz it performs the same cause my motherboard is too slow ? rams too slow ?
MOTHERBOARD P8Z68-V LX
Rams is 2x4GB Corsair 1600hz and 2x2GB unbranded 1600hz ( total 12gb )
 

digitalgriffin

Distinguished
Jan 29, 2008
327
33
18,820
1
You would be extremely lucky to get 4.5GHz out of IvyBridge. I tweeked mine NUMEROUS HOURS. Anything above 1.25V with a moderate to low LLC, and optimized phase control wouldn't get me above 4.4GHz. It just got hotter, and hotter quicker. 1.25V 4.4GHz allowed me to run Prime 95 stable and below 70F with a 120mm AIO liquid cooler OR Hyper 212.

The problem was intel's stacking of the transistors. While 3D stacking worked, it wasn't a good looking 3D stack. (Of good consistency of thickness) on the vertical Fin. As you can see on the right image it's a little "clumpy" This was cleaned up by 5xxx series. (And why you see allowed use of higher voltages as there's a consistent thickness of the conductor)


I think the above reason is why Intel is so insistent about their multi patterning 10nm process. The vertical 3D transistor allowed much faster switching speeds (eventually) but had to be precisely manufactured to allow for a consistent fin. Hence the multi-patterning they insist on using. It was a necessity to allow the transistors to run at a similar speed. (Disclaimer: This is an educated guess alone.) Each time you have to add a new layering pattern/pass, the chance of failure increases. And Intel has a lot of imaging passes last I read.

Moving to 7nm would make this patterning even harder. So in essence, by making their transistors more "precise" during imaging, Intel has painted themselves into a corner making the node shrink that much harder.
 

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