Question i7 4790 not getting enough wattage, 68W

Devin Haha DeVo

Honorable
May 3, 2015
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10,510
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Hello all,
I used MSI Kombustor - CPU Burner to max out my CPU. All eight threads reach 100% utilization, max temp steadies at 80C. Max Watts is 68.

My issues arise while trying to play any fps: Siege, Rust, GTA V, and Squad.
After setting Radeon Chill Max FPS to 60 in each, I can play Siege only. The others still crash shortly after any combat, but they do load in.

Siege would crash after a while, so I set Radeon setting to gaming, Windows setting to optimized, and motherboard to gaming; this fixed siege issue and led me to realize it is most likely a wattage issue. However, no crash happens when I do the stress test with CPU burner. Which confused me.

GPU fluctuates, but of no concern of overheating. At consistent 100% usage reached 71C, but again seems like low Wattage of 150 at 100%.

Specs:
OS: Windows 10
CPU: Intel i7 4790
GPU: Radeon RX 580
MB: Z97-C ASUS
PSU: CoolMax 240 Pin 1000W
Memory: Not sure brand 16gb ram, 500 gb ssd. Can see if needed.

If you need anything else to help guide me, please let me know. I have not been able to enjoy a first person pvp yet. :(
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Not really sure what that is based on.

i7-4790 is a locked processor, expected TDP of 84W, under a full AVX load, likely. Average gaming load probably won't take it to max. If this is the K, and it is unlocked and has been overclocked, might reach 150W with it at 4.4-4.6Ghz, pumping 1.35+ volts through it.

RX580 lists a total board power of 185W, so 150W at max usage, is pretty close to that. If that sensor is measuring only the GPU itself, and not the entire card (fans, mostly the other big power draw) then that is also quite close to being correct. And again, hard to 100% utilize everything on the card with games.

You could also just have more efficient components then usual, those numbers are as designed...

1000W power supply, super overkill, but not familiar with that brand. Can you get the model number? That might actually be causing your issues if it is overheating or the capacitors are on the way out.

After that I would start looking at software. Update drives, check for new BIOS on the motherboard, run memtest x86 and see if the RAM might actually be causing an issue. Check the event logs in Windows and see what software actually crashed. Could be something simple like an out of date C++ redistributable that those games need. (Sometimes best to remove the ones you have, grab the latest of each from Microsoft (2005, 2008. 2012 etc)
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
If this is the CoolMax ZU-1000B I would not trust that to output 1000W. Looks like a cheap Sirtec built unit, maybe Channel Well, which would be better, but that really depends on how it was designed. Maybe, can't find any legitimate reviews. (Also no idea why they advertise on Amazon with 240-pin that is literally meaningless. 20+4, might just be a typo) If it actually has 240 pins, hooray for counting?

For the price that thing is listed on Amazon, better off with a Corsair RM 650W or other comparable Seasonic unit. More then enough power for the system and capable of delivering what is promised on the box.
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
I used MSI Kombustor - CPU Burner to max out my CPU. All eight threads reach 100% utilization, max temp steadies at 80C. Max Watts is 68.

... Windows setting to optimized, and motherboard to gaming; this fixed siege issue and led me to realize it is most likely a wattage issue. However, no crash happens when I do the stress test with CPU burner. Which confused me.

Specs:
CPU: Intel i7 4790
TDP specifications are a Power "envelope" which is generally based on the fastest unlocked Hyper-Threaded (Flagship) processors. The key word In the term "TDP" or Thermal Design Power is Design. Processors of the same Design are simultaneously fabricated from the same silicon wafer, but some have flaws. The best are binned as “Flagship” unlocked processors with all features enabled. Those with more flaws either have Cores, Hyper-Threading, Integrated Graphics, certain Instruction Sets or some Cache disabled, and may be locked or binned at slower Core speeds. Intel sells these processors as i5s, i3s, Pentiums or Celerons.

Only "Flagship" processors will reach their rated TDP, such as the 2700K, 3770K, 4770K, 4790K, 6700K and 7700K. For example, although processors of the same Design, Generation and Core count may share the same Thermal Design Power, variants without Hyper-Threading and those which run at slower Core speeds consume less Power and may not reach or exceed TDP unless overclocked.

Since i5 variants don't have Hyper-Threading, they consumes about 12% less Power, so they don't reach TDP and run about 4°C lower than the i7 with the same CPU cooler. Further, the i5 is several hundred MHz slower which also consumes less Power, which applies to the 4790, whereas its Base and Boost clocks are both 400 MHz lower than the 4790K.

Actual Power consumption (Watts) may vary from TDP specifications among the same CPU models due to differences in VID (Voltage IDentification), Auto Core voltage, BIOS and microcode updates. Also, motherboard stock settings may vary from Intel stock settings.

i7-4790 is a locked processor, expected TDP of 84W, under a full AVX load, likely. Average gaming load probably won't take it to max. If this is the K, and it is unlocked and has been overclocked, might reach 150W with it at 4.4-4.6Ghz, pumping 1.35+ volts through it.
As per Intel’s Datasheets, TDP and Thermal Specifications are validated “without AVX. Moreover, 150 Watts is typical of 6 Core processors. The 4 Core "K" processors mentioned above all consume about 110 to 130 watts when well overclocked at their maximum recommended Core voltages, which varies per Microarchitecture. For example, it’s important to point out that 22 nanometer 3rd and 4th Generation processors will not tolerate the higher Core voltages of other Microarchitectures.

Here's the Maximum Recommended Vcore per Microarchitecture from 14 to 65 nanometers since 2006:


Each Microarchitecture also has a "Degradation Curve". As a rule, CPUs are more susceptible to electromigration and degradation with each Die-shrink. However, the exception to the rule is Intel's 14 nanometer Microarchitecture, where advances in "FinFET" transistor technology have improved voltage tolerance.

Here's how the Degradation Curves correspond to Maximum Recommended Vcore for 22 nanometer 3rd and 4th Generation, which differs from 14 nanometer 5th through 10th Generation:


Degradation Curves are relative to the term “VT(Voltage threshold)Shift” which is expressed in millivolts (mv). Users can not monitor Vt Shift. With respect to overclocking and overvolting, Vt Shift basically represents the potential for permanent loss of normal transistor performance. Excessively high Core voltage drives excessively high Power consumption and Core temperatures, all of which contribute to gradual Vt Shift over time. Core voltages that impose high Vt Shift values are not recommended.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.

Core temperatures increase and decrease with ambient (room) temperature, for which the International "Standard" is 22°C or 72°F.

CT :sol:
 

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