[SOLVED] i7 4790k OC unstasble on any stress test softweare

Andreas Liang

Honorable
May 7, 2015
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PC specs :
i7 4790k
Asrock Z97 anniversary
PC cooler paladin 400
Corsair vengeance pro 1600mhz 4x4

So, Im doing overclocking to my cpu @4.5 ghz (vcore voltage 1.300 and input voltage 1.900) and it cant pass the stress test like P95 v26.6, aida64, and asus realbench.
I already try to turn down my overclocking to 4.4/4.3 ghz and it still crash on stress test software.
But i dont have any problems when i play games like valorant and apex legends, it works really fine i got like max 66 C temps.

So, my question are what's wrong with my system? is it necessary to pass the stress test? eventho im not using it for extreme task such as rendering, etc.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
it is not necessary to pass any given "stress test".

All that is necessary is that you can successfully overclock or otherwise configure your system to play games without crashing.

If the stress test crashes your system then it is very likely that the test has gone beyond the system's "limits".

Which is moot if not even necessary.

Stress tests are only useful as a tool to test if a system will break if that system is required to achieve some level of performance.

Very sure that my desk chair will collapse if I allow all the grandkids to sit in it at one time. Why should I test that if that is not at all a realistic requirement or expectation?
 
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Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
it is not necessary to pass any given "stress test".

All that is necessary is that you can successfully overclock or otherwise configure your system to play games without crashing.

If the stress test crashes your system then it is very likely that the test has gone beyond the system's "limits".

Which is moot if not even necessary.

Stress tests are only useful as a tool to test if a system will break if that system is required to achieve some level of performance.

Very sure that my desk chair will collapse if I allow all the grandkids to sit in it at one time. Why should I test that if that is not at all a realistic requirement or expectation?
 
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This part of the problem, and no air cooling doesn't really go well with extreme overclocking.
PC cooler paladin 400
I highly recommend you get a better lga 1150 air cooler or try water cooling with a high quality water block if necessary.
 
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Karadjgne

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Ambassador
The 4th gen cpus had AVX available. Which is part of every stress test in some fashion unless disabled. AVX technologies is like running the cpu at 120-150%, depending on the AVX used.

If you run P95, use small fft (not smallest) and make sure AVX is disabled. That gives a straight 100% workload, but is best used not as a stress test, but as a temp test. Your games are Not using 100% loads, even if they hit 100% usage. Closer to 50-60% actual load. Big difference to a stress test.

If the only thing you've done is jack the vcore to 1.3v, you are going to crash. Period. With any OC, you'll have to change current limits, voltage states, LLC, ring voltages, vid, sa agent, vccio, and maybe others to a certain degree, depending on your cpu's needs and ram + motherboard required outputs.

1.3v is absolute max safe limits for a short term OC on 4th Gen Intel. For daily use, you should be closer to 1.20-1.25v at most. OC is about getting the best speeds at the lowest voltages possible, according to cooling ability.
 

Andreas Liang

Honorable
May 7, 2015
6
0
10,510
0
The 4th gen cpus had AVX available. Which is part of every stress test in some fashion unless disabled. AVX technologies is like running the cpu at 120-150%, depending on the AVX used.

If you run P95, use small fft (not smallest) and make sure AVX is disabled. That gives a straight 100% workload, but is best used not as a stress test, but as a temp test. Your games are Not using 100% loads, even if they hit 100% usage. Closer to 50-60% actual load. Big difference to a stress test.

If the only thing you've done is jack the vcore to 1.3v, you are going to crash. Period. With any OC, you'll have to change current limits, voltage states, LLC, ring voltages, vid, sa agent, vccio, and maybe others to a certain degree, depending on your cpu's needs and ram + motherboard required outputs.

1.3v is absolute max safe limits for a short term OC on 4th Gen Intel. For daily use, you should be closer to 1.20-1.25v at most. OC is about getting the best speeds at the lowest voltages possible, according to cooling ability.
I already changed the vcore v to 1.25v and input voltage to 1.85. Do you have any tutorial or suggestion for my specific cpu and motherboard? because its really hard to find OC tutorial with i7 4790k and asrock z97 anniversary.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
OC is OC. The theory on different gens is all the same, regardless if it's a i5-4670k or i7-4790k on an msi mobo or Gigabyte mobo or ASR. Vcore is vcore, no matter what name is used.

I'd start at Asus ROG forums. They'll have old posts on OC that 4th gen, you just may have to apply the settings with slightly different names. The settings are the same. What's important is what the settings represent, not their name. Read Everything to do with 4thgen OC, what worked, what didn't. You need the How and Why, not the exact number.

You need to learn the differences between vid, vcore, ring voltages and procedures and limits etc, if you change one, what do you change on the others. The only important exact numbers being maximum limits, like 1.3v vcore.
 
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