[SOLVED] i7-6700/MSI Z270 won't load XMP profile

KalebJohns

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Sep 22, 2013
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Good afternoon, all. Just paired an i7-6700 with an MSI Z270 Gaming M5. Updated the BIOS, got everything necessary for POST test installed. Just picked up some Corsair Vengeance LPX 2 x 8GB 3600, and I can't seem to get the computer to POST with the XMP profile loaded. The memory is 2133 base, so it enters BIOS just fine. Once I load XMP, nothing happens, stuck on board code B2. Same goes for my Ballistix 2 x 16GB 3200 kit, G.Skill Aegis 2 x 8GB 3000 kit.. Does Intel seriously not allow for XMP profiles to be loaded on an Non-K SKU anymore? TIA
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Does Intel seriously not allow for XMP profiles to be loaded on an Non-K SKU anymore? TIA
XMP profiles work fine with non-K SKUs on Z series boards. Sounds to me more like there is a problem in the memory pipe somewhere OR you have the DIMMs installed in the wrong slots.

First, make sure you have the memory installed in the second and fourth slots over from the CPU, with the fourth slot being the one closest to the edge of the motherboard. Those are the A2 and B2 slots.

If you don't, move them. If you do, then the problem is likely related to either a motherboard with one or more bent pins or a faulty CPU. Yes, it IS common for there to be faulty hardware BUT be able to run the memory at the base frequency which it defaults to, but NOT be able to get it to run at the XMP profile speed and timings OR get it to run in dual channel.

If you DO already have them installed in the A2 and B2 slots, then just for grins, try the A1 and B1 slots. It's unlikely they will work that way, but it's worth a shot. Occasionally it does. Rarely.

If none of that works, and there are no bent pins (And DO check, because if you knew how many times I've been told "no, there are none" and it turns out that there ARE, your eyeballs would explode and your ears would start bleeding.), and there is no foreign debris or dust bunnies in either of the DIMM slots AND if you are 150% certain that there are no standoffs installed in the case motherboard tray that don't line up EXACTLY with a matching mounting hole in the motherboard, then I'd make sure the DIMMs are in the correct slots and try a hard reset of the BIOS as follows.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Does Intel seriously not allow for XMP profiles to be loaded on an Non-K SKU anymore? TIA
XMP profiles work fine with non-K SKUs on Z series boards. Sounds to me more like there is a problem in the memory pipe somewhere OR you have the DIMMs installed in the wrong slots.

First, make sure you have the memory installed in the second and fourth slots over from the CPU, with the fourth slot being the one closest to the edge of the motherboard. Those are the A2 and B2 slots.

If you don't, move them. If you do, then the problem is likely related to either a motherboard with one or more bent pins or a faulty CPU. Yes, it IS common for there to be faulty hardware BUT be able to run the memory at the base frequency which it defaults to, but NOT be able to get it to run at the XMP profile speed and timings OR get it to run in dual channel.

If you DO already have them installed in the A2 and B2 slots, then just for grins, try the A1 and B1 slots. It's unlikely they will work that way, but it's worth a shot. Occasionally it does. Rarely.

If none of that works, and there are no bent pins (And DO check, because if you knew how many times I've been told "no, there are none" and it turns out that there ARE, your eyeballs would explode and your ears would start bleeding.), and there is no foreign debris or dust bunnies in either of the DIMM slots AND if you are 150% certain that there are no standoffs installed in the case motherboard tray that don't line up EXACTLY with a matching mounting hole in the motherboard, then I'd make sure the DIMMs are in the correct slots and try a hard reset of the BIOS as follows.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
 

KalebJohns

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Sep 22, 2013
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I will take a look into any bent pins or debris in the socket/DIMM slots. The modules are in A1 and B1 currently, I made sure to get that much correct. I'll report back and mark your reply as the answer if that turns out to be the case.

Thank you for your input!
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
No, that's not correct. That's exactly wrong. That is probably exactly WHY you can't get them to run at the XMP profile. As I said, they SHOULD be in the A2 and B2 slots, which are the second and fourth slots away from the CPU. Not the A1 and B1 slots, which are the first and third slots over from the CPU. Most modern boards will NOT run in XMP or dual channel mode properly, especially at XMP speeds, when those slots are populated by the primary A2 and B2 slots are empty.

That population rule applies to ALL dual channel consumer motherboards released over the last, eh, at least twelve years or so. For the most part, it applies to all except some of the earliest low density DDR3 dual channel boards, and ALL of the dual channel DDR4 motherboards.
 

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