Question i7 8086k overclock temps way way too high

Jun 7, 2020
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Hi, i overclocked my 8086k at 5ghz at 1.330V vcore, loadline on turbo, and i have a 240mm AIO cooling system with fresh thermal paste installed literal hours ago. Temps are 50-60c at IDLE and 90-95 under load while gaming, and max at 99 on all cores under small FFT stress test with prime95. I have no idea what im doing wrong. I know 8086k can run a little hot but this seems insane
 
Yeah, remove the overclock and check your temps then, though with such a high idle temperature I'm wondering if you have a mounting issue with your cooler. If you have high ambient temps eg. 40 celsius with no air conditioning that is going to limit how far you can overclock.

A couple of other notes to consider, the 8086K will get quite hot as you approach 1.35V for Vcore and anything above 1.35V typically requires you to delid your CPU and replace the thermal paste inside with a liquid metal compound in order to get temps under control regardless of what cooler you use. Second, for Prime 95 make sure you disable AVX or use version 26.6. AVX workloads under Prime95 put an unrealistically high power load onto the CPU and aren't exactly great indicators of what your temps would be in any real world workload.

Edit: Monitor your Vcore and see what is actually being delivered to your CPU, if you have your LLC set high, you may be overshooting your target voltage and actually be delivering more than 1.35V to the CPU rather than 1.33.
 
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Jun 7, 2020
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Yeah, remove the overclock and check your temps then, though with such a high idle temperature I'm wondering if you have a mounting issue with your cooler. If you have high ambient temps eg. 40 celsius with no air conditioning that is going to limit how far you can overclock.

A couple of other notes to consider, the 8086K will get quite hot as you approach 1.35V for Vcore and anything above 1.35V typically requires you to delid your CPU and replace the thermal paste inside with a liquid metal compound in order to get temps under control regardless of what cooler you use. Second, for Prime 95 make sure you disable AVX or use version 26.6. AVX workloads under Prime95 put an unrealistically high power load onto the CPU and aren't exactly great indicators of what your temps would be in any real world workload.
yea ive heard prime runs way higher than youll ever experience, but im getting 90-95 constantly in game, which is still way high i feel, not sure what ive done incorrectly, thermal paste is freshly applied and the cooler is mounted correctly
 
yea ive heard prime runs way higher than youll ever experience, but im getting 90-95 constantly in game, which is still way high i feel, not sure what ive done incorrectly, thermal paste is freshly applied and the cooler is mounted correctly
Yeah, like I said in my edit, check to see what your Vcore actually is when the CPU is under load with your overclock. It looks like you have your loadline calibration set to a high level and that can sometimes cause your Vcore to overshoot the value you select and you're already cutting pretty close to the limit of what's possible without a delid on that chip. If you are overshooting past 1.35V you may have to drop the voltage or LLC a bit and see if you can get stability, if not you may have to settle for 4.9GHz, that's what I wound up having to do with my 8700k.
 
Jun 7, 2020
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Yeah, like I said in my edit, check to see what your Vcore actually is when the CPU is under load with your overclock. It looks like you have your loadline calibration set to a high level and that can sometimes cause your Vcore to overshoot the value you select and you're already cutting pretty close to the limit of what's possible without a delid on that chip. If you are overshooting past 1.35V you may have to drop the voltage or LLC a bit and see if you can get stability, if not you may have to settle for 4.9GHz, that's what I wound up having to do with my 8700k.
Looks like vcore is steady at 1.33V, any other suggestions?
 
Looks like vcore is steady at 1.33V, any other suggestions?
Well if you haven't already you can set your 240mm AIO to bump up the fan and pump speed to maximum and see if that helps you. You can try remounting the cooler, though your stock temps seem to be okay so that's probably not the problem. Odds are though you may simply have a chip with a bad thermal paste application in between the heatspreader and the die and that is the main thing causing the high temps, and in that case your only solutions are to either delid and replace the paste, or you dial back the voltage and reduce the overclock a bit to get the temps under control.
 
Jun 7, 2020
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Well if you haven't already you can set your 240mm AIO to bump up the fan and pump speed to maximum and see if that helps you. You can try remounting the cooler, though your stock temps seem to be okay so that's probably not the problem. Odds are though you may simply have a chip with a bad thermal paste application in between the heatspreader and the die and that is the main thing causing the high temps, and in that case your only solutions are to either delid and replace the paste, or you dial back the voltage and reduce the overclock a bit to get the temps under control.
i've no experience with changing AIO settings at all, where is that in bios? and if i were to lower the overclock, how much lower would help?
 
i've no experience with changing AIO settings at all, where is that in bios? and if i were to lower the overclock, how much lower would help?
For the AIO settings there should be fan speed settings in the BIOS and if your motherboard has a dedicated pump header, you can change pump speed through that. Some AIOs have control software from the manufacturer that can alter these settings in Windows for you, check the manufacturer's website if you don't want to mess with it in BIOS.

As for lowering the overclock, maybe drop your Vcore to 1.3V and see what your temps are like. If they are more acceptable then do the stress tests and see if 5.0GHz is still stable, if not drop down to 4.9GHz and test again. I would hope any 8086k could at least do 4.9GHz at 1.3V or even lower given that they are supposed to be better binned chips compared to the 8700k, but you never know. My 8700k does 4.9GHz at 1.32V and it's probably on the lower end of average compared to the others out there.
 
Jun 7, 2020
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For the AIO settings there should be fan speed settings in the BIOS and if your motherboard has a dedicated pump header, you can change pump speed through that. Some AIOs have control software from the manufacturer that can alter these settings in Windows for you, check the manufacturer's website if you don't want to mess with it in BIOS.

As for lowering the overclock, maybe drop your Vcore to 1.3V and see what your temps are like. If they are more acceptable then do the stress tests and see if 5.0GHz is still stable, if not drop down to 4.9GHz and test again. I would hope any 8086k could at least do 4.9GHz at 1.3V or even lower given that they are supposed to be better binned chips compared to the 8700k, but you never know. My 8700k does 4.9GHz at 1.32V and it's probably on the lower end of average compared to the others out there.
awesome. pretty sure i saw pump control in my fan settings, so ill check it out. ill try 1.3v vcore as well. do you think having an AFX offset would help in any way? ive heard from others that every 8086k chip should do 5ghz but apparently mine sucks butt
 
awesome. pretty sure i saw pump control in my fan settings, so ill check it out. ill try 1.3v vcore as well. do you think having an AFX offset would help in any way? ive heard from others that every 8086k chip should do 5ghz but apparently mine sucks butt
Your 8086k probably can do 5GHz, hell most 8700ks theoretically can do 5GHz but the fine print is that for most chips you will probably have to push your Vcore up to about 1.4V and will have to delid to keep temps under control. The 8086k is supposed to be better at achieving 5.0GHz at lower voltages and 1.33V would be on the somewhat lower end for 5.0GHz for Coffee Lake, but that might not help you much if it has crap thermal paste and overheats at 1.33V.

AVX offsets can help your chip run cooler under AVX workloads at the cost of reduced clocks when AVX instructions are on. I think even some web browsers use AVX so if you have something like Chrome open constantly that would trigger the offset and at that point you almost might as well use a lower overclock with no offset. Most games don't seem to use AVX but some do. In any case you'd have to pair the AVX offset with a lower voltage to improve temps, the idea behind it is that AVX instructions are more stressful and you have to pump more voltage to ensure stability with them, if you drop your clocks when AVX instructions are run you should be able to get away with a lower core voltage.
 
Jun 7, 2020
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Your 8086k probably can do 5GHz, hell most 8700ks theoretically can do 5GHz but the fine print is that for most chips you will probably have to push your Vcore up to about 1.4V and will have to delid to keep temps under control. The 8086k is supposed to be better at achieving 5.0GHz at lower voltages and 1.33V would be on the somewhat lower end for 5.0GHz for Coffee Lake, but that might not help you much if it has crap thermal paste and overheats at 1.33V.

AVX offsets can help your chip run cooler under AVX workloads at the cost of reduced clocks when AVX instructions are on. I think even some web browsers use AVX so if you have something like Chrome open constantly that would trigger the offset and at that point you almost might as well use a lower overclock with no offset. Most games don't seem to use AVX but some do. In any case you'd have to pair the AVX offset with a lower voltage to improve temps, the idea behind it is that AVX instructions are more stressful and you have to pump more voltage to ensure stability with them, if you drop your clocks when AVX instructions are run you should be able to get away with a lower core voltage.
Is delidding easy? i saw that i have to replace the binding , is that replaced with thermal paste or something else?
 
Is delidding easy? i saw that i have to replace the binding , is that replaced with thermal paste or something else?
It is a somewhat risky procedure depending on how you do it. Using something like a razor blade can work but you risk scratching the die or substrate if you don't do it right. Some companies did make delidding tools that makes the process easier and less risky. After that you have to clean out the old paste and replace it with a liquid metal compound, after that you can either glue the heatspreader back on, or don't glue it back on and have the mounting pressure of your cooler keep it in place. Not gluing can lead to better results but it is easier to screw up, particularly as liquid metal is conductive and can short out your CPU if it gets anywhere aside from the top of the die.

Another thing to note is that the liquid metal paste does slowly degrade over time and often you do have to go through the process again roughly every 1-2 years it seems. Whether all that is worth it to squeeze another 100MHz out of your CPU is up to you, I ultimately chose not to delid my 8700k, I felt it wasn't worth the risk or hassle for that extra 100MHz.
 
Jun 7, 2020
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It is a somewhat risky procedure depending on how you do it. Using something like a razor blade can work but you risk scratching the die or substrate if you don't do it right. Some companies did make delidding tools that makes the process easier and less risky. After that you have to clean out the old paste and replace it with a liquid metal compound, after that you can either glue the heatspreader back on, or don't glue it back on and have the mounting pressure of your cooler keep it in place. Not gluing can lead to better results but it is easier to screw up, particularly as liquid metal is conductive and can short out your CPU if it gets anywhere aside from the top of the die.

Another thing to note is that the liquid metal paste does slowly degrade over time and often you do have to go through the process again roughly every 1-2 years it seems. Whether all that is worth it to squeeze another 100MHz out of your CPU is up to you, I ultimately chose not to delid my 8700k, I felt it wasn't worth the risk or hassle for that extra 100MHz.
Gotcha. doesnt seem like id want to do that then. I turned down my overclock to 4.9ghz and vcore to 1.3 and im still getting 98C under stress test
 
its geting those temps with aida64 too... and 85C in game, which is better but not really
Yeah that's not great, either you have a chip with very poor thermal paste leading to serious thermal transfer problems or your AIO water cooling system isn't exactly set up optimally. Trying a remount of the waterblock might be helpful just to make sure, other than that depending on where the radiator is mounted make sure the fans are oriented properly, top mount is usually better as an exhaust, if you have it mounted to the front of the case then having the fans as an intake might help cooling performance a bit more assuming the front panel isn't horribly obstructed for stylistic reasons.
 
Jun 7, 2020
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hi guys, after some messing around, i decided to lower overclock to 4.8 and vcore to 1.235V, and my temps in game didnt change at all, stil l80-85C D: not sure what else to do
 
hi guys, after some messing around, i decided to lower overclock to 4.8 and vcore to 1.235V, and my temps in game didnt change at all, stil l80-85C D: not sure what else to do
At that low a voltage you shouldn't be seeing temps that high when gaming. Either your water cooler isn't working that great for whatever reason, or you have a chip with absolutely terrible thermal paste inside. I'd say try remounting the waterblock just to make sure that isn't an issue, and if that doesn't work you may have to go ahead and delid if you really want to overclock that CPU.
 

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