i7 8700(NON K) temperature question

TheMasti

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Aug 19, 2015
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I've been looking at some PCs the last few days for a future build.
But I'm currently stuck between an i5 8400 and i7 8700(non k)

I've kinda already planned on using the 8400, but the 8700 is a bit tempting with the HT, and from what I've read about the i5, it won't bottleneck a GTX 1080. Only in games like Battlefield 1, but I'm not even going to play that.

My question is: How does the 8700 handle volts and heat?
I've been researching, and from what I'm reading, it can use up to 1.4V (Something like that) automatically and be about 90C while playing games. And that scares me.
I'll be using: Be quiet! Pure Rock, for my build.
And the motherboard is going to be an Asus TUF Z370-plus gaming

So if anyone who has an i7 8700(non k) is reading this, please share your experience, temps, cooler etc.
 

jr9

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Hyperthreading does not make a big difference in gaming. Game engines just don't really take advantage of large amounts of threads and I do not believe that is going to change any time soon. 6 core 6 thread will be solid for gaming for years. 4 core 4 thread is still alive and well and still is viable and has been around at least 10 years now although it does show its age in some titles. The 8700 and 8700K are overkill unless you're doing content creation on the side or just going for luxury.

i5 8400 is a great CPU for midrange gaming/desktop PCs. GTX 1080 and a i5 8400 would work fine although I'd opt for something like a 8600k. If you're getting a high end graphics card then you should get a higher end CPU like the 8600k or 8700 (if you actually need HT) just for the sake of future proofing. Also unless you're playing at 1440p or 4K the GTX 1080 would be overkill as well and you wouldn't be getting the most out of it. If this is a 1080p machine I'd go for an i5 8400 with a GTX 1060 6GB or an i5 8600k with a GTX 1070.
 

mdd1963

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8700 runs uncomfortably warm with stock cooler...(3 folks here have had them running 86C during gaming loads....I consider that 'too warm')

If you'd have to buy a cooler anyway, might as well just get the 8600K instead...
 


Not only does the Intel Stock Cooler cause hot temps, it actually causes throttling on the 8700 as the CPU can't achieve its 4.3GHz all core Turbo with the Stock cooler, you wind up only getting about 3.2-3.5GHz instead. Intel really needs to bring back one of their older larger heatsinks with the copper slug from the Nehalem or Sandy Bridge days for their 6 core mainstream chips, or design a better cooler, because the current Intel stock cooler is at best barely okay for the i5 8400 and completely inadequate for the i7 8700.
 

jr9

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Since you are buying a non K (locked) processor and therefor not overclocking, voltages and heat levels are irrelevant to you. The stock cooler that comes with the processor will keep the processor cool to safe levels under normal operating conditions. If it didn't then they would not ship the cooler in that state.

If you want lower temps in the 60s under load or a quieter cooler then there are many good aftermarket coolers available such as the Cryorig H7.

The motherboard will handle the voltages controls automatically with no need for configuration at all.

Get the i5 8400 unless you are doing something such as content creation or encoding that can take advantage of the additional threads. For a simple gaming PC a i5 8400 is completely adequate.
 

TheMasti

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That's what I thought, just stating what I've read.
Some of my friends have also been saying that future games will require more threads etc.
Just airing my concerns, and getting people's opinions.
BUT, if I end up getting the i7, I'll be getting the be quiet! pure rock.
 

jr9

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Dec 6, 2017
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Hyperthreading does not make a big difference in gaming. Game engines just don't really take advantage of large amounts of threads and I do not believe that is going to change any time soon. 6 core 6 thread will be solid for gaming for years. 4 core 4 thread is still alive and well and still is viable and has been around at least 10 years now although it does show its age in some titles. The 8700 and 8700K are overkill unless you're doing content creation on the side or just going for luxury.

i5 8400 is a great CPU for midrange gaming/desktop PCs. GTX 1080 and a i5 8400 would work fine although I'd opt for something like a 8600k. If you're getting a high end graphics card then you should get a higher end CPU like the 8600k or 8700 (if you actually need HT) just for the sake of future proofing. Also unless you're playing at 1440p or 4K the GTX 1080 would be overkill as well and you wouldn't be getting the most out of it. If this is a 1080p machine I'd go for an i5 8400 with a GTX 1060 6GB or an i5 8600k with a GTX 1070.
 

TheMasti

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Okay.
I would've gone with 8700non-k just for the sake of future proofing, and I'm also considering getting a new monitor at some point.
But I'm simply to scared about the temperatures and volts for that CPU.

I might just go with the i5 8400 + GTX 1070
Or I could get a i5 8400 + 1080, and a new monitor at some point. Just haven't looked too much into 1440p
 

jr9

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If you're staying at 1080p the GTX 1070 is as high as you want to go. The GTX 1070 can handle 1440p alright as well. The ideal processor for that card would be an i5 8600k or an i5 8400. I personally would go for the i5 8600k. In 5-7 years when the 8600k starts to show it's age you would be able to overclock it and extend it's life for a couple more years.
 
May 14, 2018
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Hello, I have bought an I7 8700 (non K) with a motherboard Asus TUF H370-plus gaming. Before to buy it I thought that I didn't have to deal with voltages, temps and other parameters because I supposed all processors non K are locked all those parameters.
But true is that you can't modify multiplier parameter (the locked one) but you will need to deal with temperatures, and voltages in order to avoid processor damages specially when you are using a stock cooler and full load tasks. The reason is because all those chips have turbo frequency that is like an automatic overclock (OC) which is activated by the motherboard when software ask for it (for example 3d rendering, stress tests, or some video games). It is better you configure that auto OC before you force a full load test. I have used an app that comes with the motherboard to put limits on temperature and voltage values.

I have changed those values from AI Suite 3 software. (almost all motherboards come with similar utilities)
Threshold:
CPU temperature 70
CPU voltage 1.2

If you set temperature threshold under 70 degrees you won't need to worry about to another parameters (motherboard will deal whit those),
and if you buy a new cooler maybe this processor will be able to reach a little bit higher frequency(100 MHz) with the same threshold temp, but no more as 8700 is able to reach.

Take in mind that: the 8700 (non K) for a single core on full load can reach frequency near to 4.6 GHz.
But as you increase the number of cores the less frequency it can reach, then when all cores are full load the maximum turbo boost frequency this processor is able to reach is just 3.8 GHz.

Supporting information:
https://communities.intel.com/thread/122550
 
Aug 1, 2018
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I have an i7 8700 and I use it with it's stock cooler (I will change the cooler soon). My ambient temp in my room in 26 degrees celcius and I got 2 front fans on my case.

With the stock cooler, my temp stays in the mid 50's to the 60's during Gaming (PUBG/Rainbow 6 Siege).

How? I disabled my turbo boost, this is a temporary solution I used so it will not get hot. It is locked at 3.2ghz but
I think it was worth the lower temps. With turbo on, I reach 78-85 degrees. I will enable turbo once I get a new cooler
 

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