i7-8700K vs i5-8600K vs i5-8400 vs R5-1600

im_shadows

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Which would you get?
The price difference between a build with 8700K and a 8600K is R$414.31($127.48), 8700K and 8400 is R$812.24($249.92) and 8700K to 1600 is R$1104.99($339.99).
The Ryzen one seems to offer a lot for its price, but, considereing that a game lasts about 2/3 years to develop, we would see Ryzen's real results (utilizing all of the 12 threads) in about a year or two. The 8700K looks like the most solid one, but also very expensive. And the i5s look like the most balanced ones for today's market, being the 8600K a solid 8700K competitor if we consider price-performance.
This build is just for gaming, no streaming or working. Since I don't have a 144hz 1440p monitor yet, let's say I wanna play on 1080p(where the processor is most stressed) with high frame rates, being ahead of the necessary hardware. And before I forget, any build will contain a GTX 1080, and same specs, CPU's the only different part.
*All these values look very expensive because I had convert Brazil's currency (R$) to US Dolars, so these values have included taxes, such as inflation and customs duties.
 

skywalkerqq

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Nov 5, 2017
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The i7 is best for heavy multitasking out of the choices. It is very fast but also very expensive. It should last quite a while into the future, intel has stepped up their efficiency with coffee lake processors, so the i7 will still be relevant maybe a decade from now.

The i5-8600k is the next best thing from the i7, I prefer it because it has a little faster single core speed (higher cache per core without multithread is amazing), also super efficient except its not the best workstation out there.

The i5-8400, dont even bother. Its just a bad version of the 8600k, and it can't even be overclocked.

The Ryzen 1600. Right now it is the best bang for buck processor. particularly fast speed, very cheap, lots of threads but not too much. It requires a little better cooling, AMD runs hot. But, I said "right now". Because it will only be the best bang for buck cpu for a little longer. Tech advances fast and it will be outdated in the next 3 years.
 

skywalkerqq

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Nov 5, 2017
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The i7 is best for heavy multitasking out of the choices. It is very fast but also very expensive. It should last quite a while into the future, intel has stepped up their efficiency with coffee lake processors, so the i7 will still be relevant maybe a decade from now.

The i5-8600k is the next best thing from the i7, I prefer it because it has a little faster single core speed (higher cache per core without multithread is amazing), also super efficient except its not the best workstation out there.

The i5-8400, dont even bother. Its just a bad version of the 8600k, and it can't even be overclocked.

The Ryzen 1600. Right now it is the best bang for buck processor. particularly fast speed, very cheap, lots of threads but not too much. It requires a little better cooling, AMD runs hot. But, I said "right now". Because it will only be the best bang for buck cpu for a little longer. Tech advances fast and it will be outdated in the next 3 years.
 

King_V

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Given the lower TDP of the Ryzen processor (65W - only the 1600X and 1800X are listed as 95W) vs the Coffee Lake processors (65W for non-K, 95W for K, except 91W for the i3-8350K), I fail to see how this constitutes the Ryzen as running hot.
 

skywalkerqq

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Ryzen chips have more threads, and they all have multithreading. the 65W just indicates how much extra power is provided to the cpu from the psu. It is a fact they run hotter, they are less efficient so they generate more heat.
 

Zerk2012

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Get the i5 8600K for pure gaming that will give you the best performance.
For 10 years people have been saying games will need more than 2 cores and that just happened in the last couple of years and is still limited to just a few games.
6 cores should last at least the life of that PC.
 

King_V

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65W is still 65W. By the very definition of TDP, what you're saying cannot possibly be.

TDP stands for Thermal Design Power, and is used to measure the amount of heat a component is expected to output when under load. For example, a CPU may have a TDP of 90W, and therefore is expected to output 90W worth of heat when in use.
If the CPU only draws 65W of power, then it cannot produce more than 65W worth of heat. Where are you getting this "fact" that the Ryzen somehow runs hotter? If that were the case, then every specification that says the Ryzen chips have a 65W TDP is a falsification.
 

gussrtk

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Current Builds, personally I would pick the 8700(non-k), reaons; comes with a cooler, great out of the box performance without needing to play around with O/C, lower TDP. With 6core+6HT, it'll be a strong CPU for years to come and easily keep up with everythign you throw at it. Turbo mode on this CPU is quite good as well, 4.6Ghz (single core performance). Yep, the 8600k can be overclocked to put out better performance than the 8700, but would Price tag of cooler + more stable motherboard be worth it in the end? Currently you can see some advantage on performance with the 8600k OCed, but give it some years, that 8700 will be better with time.
 
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