Question i7 9700k temp spikes

Aug 26, 2019
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Hello guys.

I hope someone of you can help me with my problem.

I just overclocked my i7 9700k to 5ghz all core (1.3v)

My problem: While in Idle i get around 30/35 degrees but accosionally i get temp spikes in the high 60's.

View: https://imgur.com/a/QMezjnj
HWMONITOR

Thats what hwmonitor shows me.

Did I do something wrong or is this normal?

My old 4770k didnt show such temps with the same cooler (Noctua NH C-14)

Thanks in advance :)))
 

PC Tailor

Dignified
Herald
Welcome to the forums my friend!

Temperature spikes are perfectly natural behaviour for any CPU. The cores can react to small load changes, and react fast, and what you have is a voltage and a large amount of heat being generated into an incredibly small space incredibly quickly, thus the spikes.

it’s normal to see rapid and random Core temperature “spikes” or fluctuations, especially during the first few minutes after startup. Any software activity will show some percentage of CPU Utilization in Windows Task Manager, where unnecessary Tray items, Startups, Processes and Services that contribute to excessive spiking can be disabled.
As long as you keep the CPU core temperatures below 85 degrees your fine - 80 degrees is ideal.
There's a great guide written by Computronix here:
https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/intel-temperature-guide.1488337/
 

CompuTronix

Judicious
Moderator
jackboy1337,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

Your concerns about "spiking" is a frequently asked question we see here on our Forums every day.

The short version - spiking is directly related to "Speed Shift" which is a feature your 4770K didn't have. No, you didn't do anything wrong, and yes, spiking is normal.

I just addressed the same issue in the following thread: CPU temp concerns - https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/cpu-temp-concerns.3511974/

Here's my explanations from that thread:

"Core temperatures respond instantly to changes in load.

Intel’s specification for Digital Thermal Sensor (DTS) response time for Core temperatures is 256 milliseconds, or about 1/4th of a second. Since Windows has dozens of Processes and Services running in the background, it’s normal to see rapid and random Core temperature “spikes” or fluctuations, especially during the first few minutes after startup. Any software activity will show some percentage of CPU Utilization in Windows Task Manager, where unnecessary Tray items, Startups, Processes and Services that contribute to excessive spiking can be disabled.

6th Generation processors introduced "Speed Shift" technology in Windows 10, which responds much faster to changes in workload than "SpeedStep" due to having many more Core speed and Core voltage transition levels. This allows the processor to more rapidly complete brief Windows tasks then quickly return to idle, thereby saving energy.



Since 7th through 9th Generation Speed Shift is twice as fast as 6th Generation, some users complain of Core temperature spikes which can also cause fluctuations in fan RPM at idle. Motherboard manufacturers have implemented BIOS updates that include separate SpeedStep and Speed Shift settings with more flexible fan curves and time delay options.

Spiking is strictly a result of foreground and background software activities.

Although Windows always has unnecessary Startup programs running as well as dozens of Processes and Services, if we were to take that all away so there was no software activity, then the processor would have nothing to process ... thus no spikes in software workloads, so no spikes in Core temperatures.

Software workloads drive CPU Power consumption (Watts) which in turn drives Core temperatures. Go to Task Manager and review the individual tabs to see what's causing the spiking. Some Startups, Processes and Services are required for Windows, but others are leftovers from various program installations overflowing with "bloatware". Many are unnecessary and can be disabled or uninstalled. However, since fluctuations in Core temperatures at idle can never be completely eliminated, you can alter the processor's thermal behavior by cleaning up your software, which will help to achieve a more "quiet" idle condition with minimum spiking, as shown in the example below:"



If you'd like to get yourself up to speed on this topic, then as PC Tailor suggested, you might want to read our Intel Temperature Guide.

Once again, welcome aboard!

CT :sol:
 
Last edited:
Reactions: PC Tailor
when at 800-1000 MHz, there will plenty of mid-30C action...

The instant WIndows decides to do almost anything, clock speed could ramp up for even a 1/4 second or less to 4.9 GHz or whatever, and just as quickly (or 3-10 seconds later, depending on what the tasks were) subside; during that blip upward, core temp of core(s) affected will ramp up into the 60's/70's almost just as instantly.... When tasks are complete, and clock speed , core voltage, and load decrease to 800-1000 MHz, temps fall with fractions of a second commensurately.

This has been normal (temps up with core voltage and clock speed) behavior for several years...
 
Reactions: CompuTronix
Aug 26, 2019
2
0
10
0
jackboy1337,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

Your concerns about "spiking" is a frequently asked question we see here on our Forums every day.

The short version - spiking is directly related to "Speed Shift" which is a feature your 4770K didn't have. No, you didn't do anything wrong, and yes, spiking is normal.

I just addressed the same issue in the following thread: CPU temp concerns - https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/cpu-temp-concerns.3511974/

Here's my explanations from that thread:

"Core temperatures respond instantly to changes in load.

Intel’s specification for Digital Thermal Sensor (DTS) response time for Core temperatures is 256 milliseconds, or about 1/4th of a second. Since Windows has dozens of Processes and Services running in the background, it’s normal to see rapid and random Core temperature “spikes” or fluctuations, especially during the first few minutes after startup. Any software activity will show some percentage of CPU Utilization in Windows Task Manager, where unnecessary Tray items, Startups, Processes and Services that contribute to excessive spiking can be disabled.

6th Generation processors introduced "Speed Shift" technology in Windows 10, which responds much faster to changes in workload than "SpeedStep" due to having many more Core speed and Core voltage transition levels. This allows the processor to more rapidly complete brief Windows tasks then quickly return to idle, thereby saving energy.



Since 7th through 9th Generation Speed Shift is twice as fast as 6th Generation, some users complain of Core temperature spikes which can also cause fluctuations in fan RPM at idle. Motherboard manufacturers have implemented BIOS updates that include separate SpeedStep and Speed Shift settings with more flexible fan curves and time delay options.

Spiking is strictly a result of foreground and background software activities.

Although Windows always has unnecessary Startup programs running as well as dozens of Processes and Services, if we were to take that all away so there was no software activity, then the processor would have nothing to process ... thus no spikes in software workloads, so no spikes in Core temperatures.

Software workloads drive CPU Power consumption (Watts) which in turn drives Core temperatures. Go to Task Manager and review the individual tabs to see what's causing the spiking. Some Startups, Processes and Services are required for Windows, but others are leftovers from various program installations overflowing with "bloatware". Many are unnecessary and can be disabled or uninstalled. However, since fluctuations in Core temperatures at idle can never be completely eliminated, you can alter the processor's thermal behavior by cleaning up your software, which will help to achieve a more "quiet" idle condition with minimum spiking, as shown in the example below:"



If you'd like to get yourself up to speed on this topic, then as PC Tailor suggested, you might want to read our Intel Temperature Guide.

Once again, welcome aboard!

CT :sol:
when at 800-1000 MHz, there will plenty of mid-30C action...

The instant WIndows decides to do almost anything, clock speed could ramp up for even a 1/4 second or less to 4.9 GHz or whatever, and just as quickly (or 3-10 seconds later, depending on what the tasks were) subside; during that blip upward, core temp of core(s) affected will ramp up into the 60's/70's almost just as instantly.... When tasks are complete, and clock speed , core voltage, and load decrease to 800-1000 MHz, temps fall with fractions of a second commensurately.

This has been normal (temps up with core voltage and clock speed) behavior for several years...
Thanks guys. So everything is normal nice. :)
 

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