[SOLVED] i9- 10920x reach 100c in Coretemp with new H100

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Apr 11, 2021
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-Prebuilt PCSpecialist
  • ASUS ROG motherboard
  • i9-10920x,
11months old

2x120mm rad is mounted in front of case, tubes at bottom. CPU pump is mounted with tubes facing up.
1 single 120mm exhaust fan

CPU is reaching +100c just idle, even after a new H100 AIO is installed.

-cleaned PC, wasn't that dirty
-checked thermal paste, and replaced with pad
-checked cooler mounting
-doubled checked AIO rad positioning.
-tried performance and balanced BIOS modes
- CPU passes INTEL diagnostic check.


What else can I do?
 
Apr 11, 2021
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  1. make sure you removed the sticker from the coldplate
  2. make sure enough thermal paste is used. Too much > too little.
  3. Make sure it is mounted securely.
  4. Max out pump speed in bios.
I am suspecting an incorrect reading is possible
  1. no sticker
  2. used thermal PAD not paste, cut to exactly size needed. when switching coolers, they are properly compressed.
  3. mounting is secure
  4. bios fan reads CPU-Fan at 100%
 
Apr 11, 2021
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Connect pump to AIO_PUMP header instead.
Connect fans from radiator to CPU_FAN and CPU_OPT.
changed around,
  1. make sure you removed the sticker from the coldplate
  2. make sure enough thermal paste is used. Too much > too little.
  3. Make sure it is mounted securely.
  4. Max out pump speed in bios.
Also, what does HWINFO say about temperatures? What are clock speeds too under load?

Free Download HWiNFO Sofware | Installer & Portable for Windows, DOS

I am suspecting an incorrect reading is possible


View: https://i.imgur.com/ReCzPz9.png
 
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Apr 11, 2021
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CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
Charak,

I see several issues here ...

The i9-10920X is an HEDT (High End DeskTop) processor with 12 Cores and 24 Threads that's rated for 165 Watts TDP at base frequency, which is its "PL1" (Power Limit) value. When the processor is running a heavy workload, the Power consumption increases to its "PL2" value, which is double the PL1 value at a blistering 330 Watts TDP.

(1) A low-end 240mm AIO is not nearly capable of cooling the high-end i9-10920X at PL2; a 360mm AIO or a custom loop is recommended.

(2) It's highly likely that you have air in the pump, since the radiator is mounted improperly. AIOs do not contain 100% liquid; they always contain some air to allow for thermal expansion. The top end of the radiator, which is the end where the tubes are connected, should be higher than the pump, so the air will stay in the top of the radiator, instead of in the pump.

(3) Double check your installation manual for correct orientation of the pump. AIOs can allow the pump to be mounted 90 degrees out of the correct orientation. Since the processor's rectangular "Die" is oriented vertically under the heat spreader (with respect to the computer case), the flow within the water block must be oriented accordingly for optimum cooling.

(4) Tj Max or "Throttle" temperature for the i9-10920X is 94°C, so your processor should never reach 100°C. Some motherboards allow Intel's default Tj Max value to be violated by changing the value in BIOS using a "Tj Max Offset" which is NOT recommended. Check BIOS to assure that a TJ Max Offset value has not been selected.

(5) You might want to rethink pads versus paste, as paste typically has higher thermal conductivity than pads. Also, just as with paste, never reuse a pad.

CT :sol:
 
Apr 11, 2021
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Charak,

I see several issues here ...

The i9-10920X is an HEDT (High End DeskTop) processor with 12 Cores and 24 Threads that's rated for 165 Watts TDP at base frequency, which is its "PL1" (Power Limit) value. When the processor is running a heavy workload, the Power consumption increases to its "PL2" value, which is double the PL1 value at a blistering 330 Watts TDP.

(1) A low-end 240mm AIO is not nearly capable of cooling the high-end i9-10920X at PL2; a 360mm AIO or a custom loop is recommended.

(2) It's highly likely that you have air in the pump, since the radiator is mounted improperly. AIOs do not contain 100% liquid; they always contain some air to allow for thermal expansion. The top end of the radiator, which is the end where the tubes are connected, should be higher than the pump, so the air will stay in the top of the radiator, instead of in the pump.

(3) Double check your installation manual for correct orientation of the pump. AIOs can allow the pump to be mounted 90 degrees out of the correct orientation. Since the processor's rectangular "Die" is oriented vertically under the heat spreader (with respect to the computer case), the flow within the water block must be oriented accordingly for optimum cooling.

(4) Tj Max or "Throttle" temperature for the i9-10920X is 94°C, so your processor should never reach 100°C. Some motherboards allow Intel's default Tj Max value to be violated by changing the value in BIOS using a "Tj Max Offset" which is NOT recommended. Check BIOS to assure that a TJ Max Offset value has not been selected.

(5) You might want to rethink pads versus paste, as paste typically has higher thermal conductivity than pads. Also, just as with paste, never reuse a pad.

CT :sol:
View: https://i.imgur.com/GPqWnqB.png

View: https://i.imgur.com/Hy7vUQm.png




These are my loads/temps, playing a game of Golf with friends.

I screenshotted that after I had installed radiator with tubes at the top, and confirmed the pump block mounting and orientation.
I also have just updated drivers and BIOS, BIOS is now default and TJ max offset is reading 94C.
I am not reusing pads either, however I do not have any paste, but surely under these low load situations it shouldn't matter.

Like I have said, this PC has been fine for 11 months, then starts acting up. it was shipped with a noname AIO cooler, and was working fine for my gaming usage.

EDIT: My ambient room temperature is 19C.
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
Your ambient is 3° below the International Standard for "normal" room temperature, which is 22°C or 72°F, so that's certainly not a problem.

However, even when a radiator is properly mounted with the tubes higher than the pump, air can still migrate to the pump over time. But as your radiator is improperly mounted, it's almost certain that the pump has air in it. I recommend that you flip the radiator 180 degrees so the tubes are above the pump, then carefully rotate the case through all three geometrical planes to purge the air from the pump so it migrates to the top of the radiator.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
  1. no sticker
  2. used thermal PAD not paste, cut to exactly size needed. when switching coolers, they are properly compressed.
  3. mounting is secure
  4. bios fan reads CPU-Fan at 100%
Wait, thermal PAD and not paste? Why?

Seems like an issue of concern (unless I'm missing something here).

I wouldn't really recommend using thermal pad over thermal compound for CPU cooler.
 
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Apr 11, 2021
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Your ambient temperature is 3° below the International Standard, which is 22°C or 72°F, so that's certainly not a problem.

However, even when a radiator is properly mounted with the tubes higher than the pump, air can still migrate to the pump over time. But as your radiator is improperly mounted, it's almost certain that the pump has air in it. I recommend that you flip the radiator 180 degrees so the tubes are above the pump, then carefully rotate the case through all three geometrical planes to purge the air from the pump so it migrates to the top of the radiator.
As I stated, I switched the rad around so tubes are at the top above the pump.

Can switching to thermal paste really give me 30c difference at idle? The pads I bought were really highly rated.
 
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