IBM Shows Path Forward To A Post-Moore's Law Future With Five-Qubit Quantum Computer

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none12345

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Id say the title of this article is rather misleading. A path forward in certain fields certainly. For instance statistical analysis. It would be heavily used in my scientific fields.

Ad agencies would love it as well. More spam that is better able to squeeze dollars out of you. Would be great for crunching all that personal data that is collected about you.

But, for your average enthusist, they will never be a path forward. Quantum computers give you a probable answer, not an exact answer. And there are many disciplines where a probable answer can not replace an exact answer. For instance it would be bad in the financial world if sometimes 1+1=0 or sometimes 1+1=1231212314411 instead of 1+1 always = 2.

Id say about the best it would ever be for the average enthusist might be a coprocessor, while the normal computing is done with a classical core, you might for instance have a quantum coprocesser for specific work loads.

Id say there is not a chance of seeing anything in the consumer space for at least a decade, its hard to predict anything fruther out then that tho.
 
They always seem to bypass the MEMORY issue. Where are you reading and writing to ? That's required to follow a set program, even if it's quantum.

So where is the quantum memory units? How do you transfer that into the quantum CPU and the result back?

I've never, EVER, heard a discussion on how that might work.
 

Bricktop

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I wonder if (when) a quantum computer would ever become practical for the average person.
I'm not sure it will be important for checking your facebook account, but it will apply for mapping the fastest route to your destination.. Most likely that type of processing will remain in the cloud, due to the initial size of quantum computers and the growth of wireless networks. The need for such a computer in your house, may apply with computer graphics or virtual/augmented reality, when some instances of real-time rendering may be more efficiently served by "best guess" values or outcomes than by brute-forcing the exact result. When we start buying iRobots (future terminators) from Apple, quantum computing will aid object and voice recognition, as well as, motor function (for killing humans). Actually, Google is invested heavily in robots, artificial Intelligence, and quantum computing. The future extermination machine of the future might be called Chromebot.
 

BGA___

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"Such quantum computers would be able to break all of today’s public key encryption"

This is specifically why the US Govt has been dumping money in to quantum computer research like there's no tomorrow. They want that quantum computer to break encryption.
 

grimfox

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I swear I saw an article not too long ago that reported that some company (related to google IIRC) had produced a 1000qubit machine. Maybe that was just something from the rumor mill.

In response to none12345's comment about the exact answer dilemma. Certainly initially a classical computer is better for basic math in the same way a pen and paper were better than using a computer for basic math initially. As we see progress we will see qubits used more often and for less specialized purposes.
 

punahou1

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True that this can extend Moore's Law but it does not prevent the inevitable fact that silicone based technology has a definite limit in terms of miniaturization. From what we understand today this limit can only be overcome by migrating to an organic based technology. Fortunately Bell Labs is investing in this research.
 

bit_user

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This actually gets at a point that many here don't seem to grasp.

Conventional quantum computers excel at searching large combinatorical spaces, but it still takes time. Importantly, setting up the initial state and reading out the answer is also fairly slow, and the whole process often must be repeated. I don't know the details of IBM's tech, but I think it's safe to say that it won't be applicable to any sort of realtime problems.

So, no, these will not be useful for VR or killer robots, or anything like that.
 

NethJC

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This seems to be a sponsored article on IBMs part. How can they talk about quantum computers without a single mention of D-Wave?
Like I said - sponsored article....
 
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