News IBM Unveils World's First 2nm Chip with Nanosheet Tech, Intel and Samsung to Benefit

VforV

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Intel: oh yeah? Well we have 10nm...
I guess you didn't read the article... you would have seen that IBM is partnering with both Samsung and Intel to "give" them this new 2nm tech.

If it's indeed true, I'm more worried for AMD because of this... both nvidia (from Samsung) and Intel would benefit.
 

Krotow

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I guess you didn't read the article... you would have seen that IBM is partnering with both Samsung and Intel to "give" them this new 2nm tech.

If it's indeed true, I'm more worried for AMD because of this... both nvidia (from Samsung) and Intel would benefit.
TSMC are researching 2 nm for 2 years already. So AMD will be not left behind here. I would not care about Nvidia - they are miner hardware manufacturers now.
 
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Sippincider

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”Hey Intel and Samsung! We have a big breakthrough in 2nm and these chips are gonna be SWEET!”

”Cool. How are we gonna build them in volume?”

”Oh details details, you always gotta find fault in the details….”
 

VforV

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TSMC are researching 2 nm for 2 years already. So AMD will be not left behind here. I would not care about Nvidia - they are miner hardware manufacturers now.
I hope AMD won't be behind... as for Nvidia being a miner GPU provider, that is very much true, but they won't abandon gaming and lying to gamers that they care about them, thus fooling enough people to buy their overpriced GPUs - when they can.
 

Drazen

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As I'm aware Samsung promised GAA this year at their 5nm node. And this will be first GAA. TSMC plans FinFET for new few years.

Looks 2nm cause TSMC investigates 3nm.
 
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I guess you didn't read the article... you would have seen that IBM is partnering with both Samsung and Intel to "give" them this new 2nm tech.
I guess you didn't read the PR that this article was shamelessly mashed from. Samsung already has 2nm in production and TSMC has it in the lab. And it will be a cold day down below before Intel licenses a process technology from anyone much less IBM.

You should also Google the 5nm announcement IBM made a few years back. That technology also never made it into high volume manufacturing.

If you folks had an ounce of semiconductor experience you would know all of this. But hey, anything for a click.
 

VforV

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I guess you didn't read the PR that this article was shamelessly mashed from. Samsung already has 2nm in production and TSMC has it in the lab. And it will be a cold day down below before Intel licenses a process technology from anyone much less IBM.

You should also Google the 5nm announcement IBM made a few years back. That technology also never made it into high volume manufacturing.

If you folks had an ounce of semiconductor experience you would know all of this. But hey, anything for a click.
Ok Mr. Knowledge, I guess Ian is a clickbait hunting troll or a clueless tech talker too right?
It's only PR BS according to you...
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZ0yfEnwipo
 

PCWarrior

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The fact that IBM is presenting a “2nm” wafer first doesn’t mean that Intel, Samsung and TSMC haven’t already produced such wafers themselves internally through their own Research and Development process. Also it should be noted that this “2nm” node is comparable to what Intel would call 6nm in their scale. And it is waaaay much easier to build simple transistor structures in the lab than actually make a large scale manufacturing node using the same transistor concept and on top of that be able to build complex architectures and multiple cores in a large die.

I am pretty sure in 2011 Intel produced such kind of demo wafer internally for their 10nm and they also showed a Canonlake wafer in 2017. It took them 6 years to demonstrate a cpu wafer and over a decade to successfully make large cpus in large scale with it. I am not suggesting that the same will happen again (especially given that EUV can now be used) but there is at least a lag of 4-5 years before a technology like this can make it from this stage to mass production. I expect this to be a thing in mid to late 2025.
https://www.anandtech.com/show/16656/ibm-creates-first-2nm-chip
 

thGe17

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TSMC are researching 2 nm for 2 years already. So AMD will be not left behind here. I would not care about Nvidia - they are miner hardware manufacturers now.
Most likely a misjudgment. AMD has almost nothing to do with manufacturing. The firm is only a customer like anybody else and therefore relies on what foundries like TSMC offer.
And Nvidia is no minor manufacturer. According latest statistics, AMDs share of TSMCs revenue in 2020 was about 3,3 billion US$ whereas Nvidias share was about 3,5 bn. US$. For 2021 the statistic estimates 4,7 bn. US$ for AMD mostly due to SoC production, and Nvidia reduced its volume to 3,0 bn. US$ but they have shifted a large portion of their production to Samsung.
Additionally, which also might be a surprise: Intel with its relatively small outsourced parts is at TSMC almost as large as AMD. Their manufacturing volume was about 2,7 bn. US$ in 2020 and will be about 3,7 bn. US$ in 2021, therefore only the few outsourced parts almost match AMDs complete production at TSMC (CPU chiplets, APUs, GPUs and console SoCs; the only thing missing here is the IOD, which is manufactured at GloFo in 12/14nm).
Apple still is the single largest customer at TSMC according to revenue share: 2020 about 11,0 bn. US$, in 2021 estimated 13,0 bn. US$, but the share cannot be directly transformed into manufacturing volume, because Apple always uses the latest and most expensive node and they additionally pay/support TSMC in their process development. Still their wafer-volume is obviously also much higher than that of AMD.
 
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PCWarrior

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Most likely a misjudgment. AMD has almost nothing to do with manufacturing. The firm is only a customer like anybody else and therefore relies on what foundries like TSMC offer.
And Nvidia is no minor manufacturer. A
You misunderstood what he wrote. He said miner, not minor. Miner as in cryptocurrency (e.g. Bitcoin, Ethereum, etc) mining. He basically said that Nvidia’s hardware is (and will be) irrelevant to consumers because, due to mining demand, whatever GPU Nvidia manufactures on these future nodes will be either impossible to purchase or available at scalped pricing 3-4x higher than MSRP (much like it happens with the current generation that is on the much inferior 8nm node).
 
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Ok Mr. Knowledge, I guess Ian is a clickbait hunting troll or a clueless tech talker too right?
It's only PR BS according to you...
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZ0yfEnwipo
Great example. Ian has zero semiconductor experience as well. I'm sure his parents are quite proud of what he has done with his PhD. Writing technical quips for gaming junkies.

Look back at what happened to IBM 7nm and 5nm. All show and no go. This is a technical nothing burger and you fan boys eat it up yum.
 

thGe17

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You misunderstood what he wrote. [...]He said miner, not minor. Miner as in cryptocurrency (e.g. Bitcoin, Ethereum, etc) mining. He basically said that Nvidia’s hardware is (and will be) irrelevant to consumers because, due to mining demand, whatever GPU Nvidia manufactures on these future nodes will be either impossible to purchase or available at scalped pricing 3-4x higher than MSRP (much like it happens with the current generation that is on the much inferior 8nm node).
Lol, you're right, my fault.
But still the "they are miner hardware manufacturers now" is from AMDs standpoint completely wrong. Nvidia is the major competitor and still has over 80 % market share, therefore from AMDs point of view it is completely irrelevant, that they also sell some hardware to miners. Currently AMD is unable to bring its RDNA2 in relevant volume to consumers and it remains to be seen if/when this changes. For example on Steam, the RDNA2 to Ampere ratio is currently 1:18 cards, therefore obviously much more Ampere cards find their way to players than RDNA2 cards. (Additionally: the any-RDNA2 card to RTX 3080 ratio is still 1:5 ;-))
 
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Intel will be long gone if they able to compete at scale.
Intel power right now is only numbers. If the competitor stock are the same with intel. They will gradually or difficult to sell just like nokia, blackberry
 

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