News Ice-Cooled Raspberry Pi 4 Chills to 8 Degrees Celsius

bit_user

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I don't think that's what they mean by "Ice Lake".

Are there any waterblocks that work on a Pi4? I'd rather not keep having to fill an ice bucket for my Pi. It's bad enough just keeping ice in my drinks!
 

bit_user

Splendid
Herald
With his Raspberry Pi 4 overclocked to 2 GHz and submerged in ice, Kio Diekin then plays a few retro Nintendo 64 games: GoldenEye, Killer Instinct and NFL Blitz. The first game plays smoothly while the second and third titles are a little jerky, but much more playable than they would be without overclocking and without a Raspberry Pi 4 B.
Let's get this straight. The N64 used a 94 MHz CPU with a 63 MHz GPU. The Pi is easily more than 100x as fast, and it still can't emulate the thing, in realtime? That's pretty sad.

Perhaps a much better optimization would be to use a 64-bit OS! Then, the Pi will at least have the same word-length as the 23-year-old console.
 
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SirNathan

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Let's get this straight. The N64 used a 94 MHz CPU with a 63 MHz GPU. The Pi is easily more than 100x as fast, and it still can't emulate the thing, in realtime? That's pretty sad.

Perhaps a much better optimization would be to use a 64-bit OS! Then, the Pi will at least have the same word-length as the 23-year-old console.
No computer on earth can perfectly emulate the N64. Hardware limitations aren't the main problem, although it certainly helps in some games to have a 4GHz+ Core i5 or Ryzen 5, the bigger problem is a poor understanding of how the N64 worked. The N64 was far more complex than most of the consoles that came before it (Sega Saturn is an exception), and so emulator developers have had a hard time figuring out some of the details of how it worked, and then re-creating it all. It's much harder to reverse engineer than say, the hardware of the NES or SNES.
 
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