ID-Cooling Builds Dual-Pump All-In-One Liquid Cooler With CPU And GPU Blocks

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surprisingly reasonable but quite complex 'cause of the gfx card cooling system.
people buying i7 4790k/i7 5930k/fx 9xxx with cards like r9 fury non x might be able to save a bit of moniez from using this.
 

oczdude8

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I think this is can be a great product. This is marketed towards mid-range systems, i5 with a 960, for example, and a 240mm rad should cool both components well. Im more interested to see how cool it can keep the GPU's peripheral components such as VRMs.

I think saying this will not handle high-end systems is an invalid argument because someone that spends $2000 for just a gpu and a cpu will probably also be willing to spend a couple hundred more for a custom solution, if needed.

 

Shankovich

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Was waiting for something like this. Love the idea, but the main issue still remains: No standardized hole placement on GPU boards. That, and cooling the VRMs. A fan blowing on exposed VRMs isn't enough, they need a heatsink with forced air over them. At least HBM memory will solve the RAM chip cooling issue, but no one likes 100+ Celsius VRMs......
 

jragonsoul

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I think this is can be a great product. This is marketed towards mid-range systems, i5 with a 960, for example, and a 240mm rad should cool both components well. Im more interested to see how cool it can keep the GPU's peripheral components such as VRMs.

I think saying this will not handle high-end systems is an invalid argument because someone that spends $2000 for just a gpu and a cpu will probably also be willing to spend a couple hundred more for a custom solution, if needed.
What makes it invalid? If it's a high power draw system this cooler may not be up to the task. That's what they are saying. It has zero to do with costs and everything to due with it potentially not being able to perform well enough. Seems pretty valid.
 
Not the first AIO that cools your CPU and GPU I've seen, but defiantly a better one and more up to date model...

I like the idea, though I think there needs to be 280mm and 360mm models since a CPU + GPU is a lot of heat to dissipate.
 

Frozen Fractal

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Ermmm, seems like the blocks are connected in series - which is ofcourse not a good news. And I fairly doubt whether 240mm rad can keep up, and this may well be just a prototype or aimed towards low-end gamers or SFF builders. But anyway, such ideas are cool to have, especially in such a crowded AiO market where there's only innovation of features and not of techniques.

Just hope that this doesn't make the cooler too loud! :p
 

oczdude8

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I think this is can be a great product. This is marketed towards mid-range systems, i5 with a 960, for example, and a 240mm rad should cool both components well. Im more interested to see how cool it can keep the GPU's peripheral components such as VRMs.

I think saying this will not handle high-end systems is an invalid argument because someone that spends $2000 for just a gpu and a cpu will probably also be willing to spend a couple hundred more for a custom solution, if needed.
What makes it invalid? If it's a high power draw system this cooler may not be up to the task. That's what they are saying. It has zero to do with costs and everything to due with it potentially not being able to perform well enough. Seems pretty valid.
Maybe I should have worded it differently, but saying it wont handle high power systems is pretty silly, because there is no one size fits all solution. What were they supposed to do? use a 480mm radiator to accommodate the 1% of enthusiasts running high power system that would actually buy an AIO?

Its sorta like reviewing a Toyota Camry and mentioning that it will perform poorly in a race track compared to a Ferrari. While that's completely true (as is the 240mm being insufficient for high powered systems), its irrelevant given the scope. You should only criticise something for what's its built for, not for something else. Clearly this system is not optimized for cooling a 500w cpu and gpu combo.

Now that being said, I would love to see how it would do trying to cool a 500W TDP; My guess is that it will "work" but the fan noise will be unbearable (atleast for me).
 

endeavour37a

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A 240 radiator is just enough to handle a CPU, I don't think one would get decent temps adding a GPU to the loop. Unless you can add more radiator to it, assuming the 2 pumps can handle it then it's basically a 120mm CPU cooler and 120mm GPU cooler plumed together. the temps should be in the ball park of other AIO's of this size I would guess.

With that said I think it's a real good idea building something like this, hope others follow their lead here. The price is really cheap for a 2 pump set up, sort of makes me wonder what the pumps are all about inside.
 

GPUEnthusiast

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They better have some really good fans on that puppy. If you are doing this for cooling versus air, yeah you can probably expect your GPU to lower a bit, but your CPU might even raise its temp at idle and load. A 240mm is really stretching it for a CPU and GPU. Would love to see a second iteration with a 280mm or more preferably a 360mm.
 

zodiacfml

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This needs to be reviewed ASAP. It is "almost" like buying two 240mm AIO, one for the CPU and GPU. I mean, what applications or games that maxes out both the CPU and GPU at the same time?
 

jragonsoul

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Well they do say in the review:
"Of course, at the end of the day there is one big question that remains, which is whether the single 240 mm radiator with the two fans is enough to cool both a CPU and a GPU. For low-power chips, it will probably be okay, but we are afraid that for high-end purposes you may be better off looking at separate loops or a custom kit."
It doesn't say "it wont handle high power systems." they just want buyers to beware. I agree though I would like to see it used on systems of different power ranges. It might surprise us.
 

thundervore

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While this is true we have to take into account GPUs can be cooled with a 120mm radiator with no issues. CPUs can be cooled with a 120mm radiator with no issues. Putting them both in on a single 240mm radiator should not be an issue UNLESS the customer decides they want to overclock the GPU or CPU or both, then it will be an issue.



OCCT. The will be that one person out there that will run OCCT to test this product on a overclocked CPU and say the cooler sucks because it failed :)

On a side note, imagine putting this in a Bitphoenix Prodigy or better yet in a Phanteks Enthoo Evolv ITX. Both major components cooled without the hassle of building a custom loop. A 280 would be better but they are playing it safe by testing the waters releasing a version that has the most compatibility among cases, if it succeeds then they may release a 280mm version.
 

Samer1970

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Remember that a 120 radiator was able to cool down 2 x AMD GPU in 295x2

each of those GPU are 250watts TDP

this loop is using 240 RAD for cooling GPU and CPU .. it is enough and will work well . 250 watts GPU + 88 watts CPU (i7)

 

ifIwasarichman

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I am waiting for a proper review as this is on sale now.
Can be found on ebay for $149 with free international shipping.
What is needed is a good review of both a standard system (preferably both a i5 and a i7 using both the Nvidia and AMD high end GPU's and no overclocking) and a overclocked version, slowly ramping it up until it reaches maximum potential.
As it is, I could see this as a good way to cool a standard system with slight overclocking potential, and if the fans are noisy, they can be exchanged. You could even try 4 fans .
To me the bigger questions are if the pumps are noisy under load and it's reliability. Also a top-up port on the radiator would be a good idea.
After reading through their home page, I would also like to see a detailed list of compatible GPU's tested and added.
Heatsinks can always be added to other components (I did this to my 290x with a NZXT cooler - a pile of copper heatsinks and a Gelid Rev 2 kit - and after I fitted a Noctua140mm fan to blow straight onto them, it worked well), but there is no mention of any added to the kit.
Until proper testing and I have yet to see a testing review, everything is speculation.
 

ifIwasarichman

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I am waiting for a proper review as this is on sale now.
Can be found on ebay for $149 with free international shipping.
What is needed is a good review of both a standard system (preferably both a i5 and a i7 using both the Nvidia and AMD high end GPU's and no overclocking) and a overclocked version, slowly ramping it up until it reaches maximum potential.
As it is, I could see this as a good way to cool a standard system with slight overclocking potential, and if the fans are noisy, they can be exchanged. You could even try 4 fans .
To me the bigger questions are if the pumps are noisy under load and it's reliability. Also a top-up port on the radiator would be a good idea.
After reading through their home page, I would also like to see a detailed list of compatible GPU's tested and added.
Heatsinks can always be added to other components (I did this to my 290x with a NZXT cooler - a pile of copper heatsinks and a Gelid Rev 2 kit - and after I fitted a Noctua140mm fan to blow straight onto them, it worked well), but there is no mention of any added to the kit.
Until proper testing and I have yet to see a testing review, everything is speculation.
 

ifIwasarichman

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I have been trying to contact them via email and not one of their supplied addresses on their contact page seems to work.
This is after trying various combinations of how they have written it.
These are copies of how they have it written - press@idcooling.com , or idcooling@idcooling.com
Anyone been in contact with them, please let me know their address, thanks in advance.
I am going to try and ring them up and see if that works.
 

ifIwasarichman

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Unable to get through via the phone number either.
It is strange that they are so hard to contact.
Not good if you do buy one of their products and then want to contact them for warranty
 

ifIwasarichman

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Unable to get through via the phone number either.
It is strange that they are so hard to contact.
Not good if you do buy one of their products and then want to contact them for warranty
 

ifIwasarichman

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Finally got a message through to them after modifying one of their addresses.
Will post how they reply, if it actually gets through to them.
 

ifIwasarichman

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Finally managed to get a message through, frustrating as it should go straight to compose in my email account when I click on one of their contact addresses, but it will not for some reason.
Anyone else had any luck getting through to them?
I made a mistake out of habit in my earlier comment, they have (at) instead of @, but easy enough to figure out.
Modified one of the email addresses instead of what came up with copy., now to wait and see what if they reply.
By the way, I have seen mentioned that the fans would be noisy when pushed, easy enough to fix, just get some Noctua Industrial PPC 12cm 2000rpm fans which have similar specs but approximately 10 dB lower in noise. Or if around 40dB is OK for you, the fans could be replaced with the 3000rpm versions which have a lot better specs. But I think that 4 of the 2000rpm fans (push/pull) would make a difference. Like others have said, a 280mm version would probably be better for some mild overclocking.
Just would like to see a test review first.
 
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