Question Idle temperature 50 C and Full Load Temperature 60 C on Ryzen 7 5700g

Nov 1, 2021
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Hello,

I paired my Ryzen 7 5700g up with Arctic Cooling Liquid Freezer 360 AIO cooler, because I wanted as quiet system as possible. Silent is something very important for me and I went with that AIO.

Problems started a few days after I booted my system for a first time - I didn't overclocked or auto-boosted my CPU at all, it's holding at base 3.6GHz clock, but idle temps with ~10% usage, with no apps/games running, are 50 C... At that temperatures, my AIO and system fans are running at about 1000RPM (Smart mode is turned on in bios, I even lowered RPMs a bit down because this CPU doesn't really need 360 for a base clock to stay cool), but still, it's very loud and temperatures are crazy!

Case is clean as my tongue, it doesn't have any dust on radiator/fans or something like that. Thermal paste is Arctic's MX4, applied like everyone would, not too much but it's also not lacking.

I also tried stress testing my CPU, after 15 minutes, max temp on 100% load was 61 C, and max RPMs on the fans were around 1500RPM, just a few hundres higher than idle ones..

If you know what it can be, please help me down below, this noise is so annoying and I dunno how 360mm AIO needs 1000RPM on all three fans to cool base clock Ryzen 7 5700g on idle?

EDIT:

Some guy had a similar problem, but his CPU was boosted to 4.7GHz clock, mine is, I'm repeating again, on base clock.
 
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Maybe override and set a fix voltage in bios. 1.500 is insane on a 5700g at stock clocks.

I apologize but I am not super up to date on the 5700g, I know most over clockers are setting it at 1.35v from what I read so maybe you can do 1.1 - 1.2 with those lower clocks.
 
Oct 30, 2021
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The upper end ryzen cpus run warm my9 5950x unless my fans are upwards of100% it runs around 48 55c idle temps and as high as 74c while gaming at 1920 1080. Boosting ive seen it as high as 5000+ voltage is all over the map. Their designed to go up into the 80c range while boosting

Clear cmos but first check to see if your bios is up to date. Some board werent ready for the new chips prior to release
 
Nov 1, 2021
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The upper end ryzen cpus run warm my9 5950x unless my fans are upwards of100% it runs around 48 55c idle temps and as high as 74c while gaming at 1920 1080. Boosting ive seen it as high as 5000+ voltage is all over the map. Their designed to go up into the 80c range while boosting

Clear cmos but first check to see if your bios is up to date. Some board werent ready for the new chips prior to release
BIOS is up to date. I don't know why would it run so warm if I have 360 AIO? As I said, I don't have a problem with high temps if that's normal for ryzen, but high temps results for fans to run louder in PWM, and its very annoying.

I don't know how clearing CMOS would fix the problem, but thanks!
 
Nov 1, 2021
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Update: I checked out the temperatures with full speed fans and pump (Around 2000 RPM both) and temps are pretty much THE SAME!!
I don't know how it can be..
 
Nov 1, 2021
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First you need to check your fan curve and list which headers you’re using for pump and radiator fans. might have a sub-optimal config
My pump is connected via 4 pin pump header next to CPU fan one (On Arctic Freezer AIO fans are connected to each other and everything goes to one header). I don't know what fan curve is, can you explain it to me?
 
fan curve would be what you set in the bios, as far as either cooling profile or a custom curve graphic of RPM/%age vs temp. leave your pump close to 100% - and your AIO fans should ideally connect to the CPU header for better control separate from the pump header.
that would be the flaw I was referring to.

My pump is connected via 4 pin pump header next to CPU fan one (On Arctic Freezer AIO fans are connected to each other and everything goes to one header). I don't know what fan curve is, can you explain it to me?
 
Nov 1, 2021
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That really wasn't a great idea on Arctic's end.
It's fine to have the fans run off 1 header, but the pump should've had a header all to itself.
Everything I know is that the fans are connected like they would be without a pump and radiator - like this, but the only difference is that there's another 4 pin socket on the radiator where you plug in your 3th fan (which is connected to 2 others of course), and then the only header which is actually connected to the motherboard is the pump header, and ARGB 3 pin but that doesn't matter because there's the same AIO just without ARGB which is connected the same way..

as far as either cooling profile or a custom curve graphic of RPM/%age vs temp. leave your pump close to 100% - and your AIO fans should ideally connect to the CPU header for better control separate from the pump header.
You don't know how much am I confused with this. I will send my bios fan config in a minute, let me just reset my PC real quick.

EDIT: Here's my fan config in BIOS: Pump, System

EDIT 2: As you can see, in BIOS, CPU temps are just fine, and fans are running MUCH more quiet than they are when I'm in OS.
 

Phaaze88

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there's another 4 pin socket on the radiator where you plug in your 3th fan
Yeah, that. Don't use that. That's there to help enable both the fans + pump to be controlled by a single header.
Keep the fans daisy-chained, and plug the first/third fan into just about any mobo header.
Take the pump cable and plug it into an AIO, or W_Pump header. If one isn't present, then plug it into the Cpu header.
Don't plug the pump and fans into the Cpu AND Cpu Opt header(if present); that's no different than the shared control you will want to get away from.
 
Nov 1, 2021
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Yeah, that. Don't use that. That's there to help enable both the fans + pump to be controlled by a single header.
Keep the fans daisy-chained, and plug the first/third fan into just about any mobo header.
Take the pump cable and plug it into an AIO, or W_Pump header. If one isn't present, then plug it into the Cpu header.
Don't plug the pump and fans into the Cpu AND Cpu Opt header(if present); that's no different than the shared control you will want to get away from.
What benefits will I get if I plug my fans that way?
 

Phaaze88

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Gives you more control.
When we have cpus that can dial up/down their clocks on the fly, with one or more cores several times a minute(or second), having both the pump and fans run off the same PWM signal isn't as efficient.
The smallest activity will cause the pump and fans to revv up and down constantly. That behavior isn't really good for the pump in the long run - fans are cheaper and easier to replace by comparison.
 
Nov 1, 2021
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Gives you more control.
When we have cpus that can dial up/down their clocks on the fly, with one or more cores several times a minute(or second), having both the pump and fans run off the same PWM signal isn't as efficient.
The smallest activity will cause the pump and fans to revv up and down constantly. That behavior isn't really good for the pump in the long run - fans are cheaper and easier to replace by comparison.
Yes, I understand, thanks for the advice. But we are returning back to my main question - is 50 C idle on Ryzen 7 5700g normal, especially with 360 AIO?
 

Phaaze88

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Yes, I understand, thanks for the advice. But we are returning back to my main question - is 50 C idle on Ryzen 7 5700g normal, especially with 360 AIO?
I can only answer with a 'possibly'. These temperatures have been typical of Ryzen 5000. Part of that has to do with the greater thermal density of the smaller chips.
 
Yes, I understand, thanks for the advice. But we are returning back to my main question - is 50 C idle on Ryzen 7 5700g normal, especially with 360 AIO?
I'd say it's pretty good when comparing the temps others have gotten with 8 core Ryzen 5000 series CPU's. These things are rated with a Tjmax of 95C so you've a huge margin before needing to worry.

Ryzen 5800X CPU's in particular are known to run with frequent temp surges up to 90C by design. While 5700G is different with a monolithic die, less cache and lower operating points it uses the same underlying architecture and process. Your operating temps should be quite safe I'd have to think.

Using a 360mm AIO only makes a difference because of the higher thermal capacity the large radiator and water volume offers. It can only move the heat off the CPU at a rate the water block/pump allows. That means it will be able to handle a bigger CPU running at maximum output a lot longer before the liquid thermally saturates but not necessarily hold an idle temp any lower than a 120mm AIO could if using the same size and configuration water block/pump.

In contrast, an air cooler might hold a much lower idle temp if it has a large contact patch but overheat almost instantly (thermally saturate) under load if it's fin/heat tube structure is undersized and/or using hot air from the GPU from poor case ventilation. I think it's safe to say your CPU with a 65W TDP could never thermally saturate that 360mm AIO so any cooling deficiency is purely down to the CPU to water block interface or water block efficiency.

Custom cooling loops can be so much more effective than AIO's because their water blocks are bigger, with more microfinning on the heat plate, and higher capacity pumps to pull the heat off the CPU at a higher rate.

And always run your pump at 100%...+12V...full speed. All the time. If it's too noisy to do so, something's wrong.
 
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Nov 1, 2021
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Do an experiment for me, run it on windows power saver mode then report back the idle temps
Damn, I got 30C on 10% usage with Power Saving Mode in Power Settings. It was on High Performance before, and temps on 10% usage were around 50-53C..

EDIT: It even goes lower, it's on 28 now, system temps are the same in both ways (On HW monitor, it says 38*C constantly)
 
EDIT: It even goes lower, it's on 28 now, system temps are the same in both ways (On HW monitor, it says 38*C constantly)
Now try some tried and true BM's: I'd suggest Cinebench, but single thread and multi-thread. Compare both ways, that probably kills performance.

I'd run Ryzen Balanced plan, unaltered. Simple temp readings aren't the complete picture, no more than reading the temperature of the match that you use to light a fire. The match is 'hot', but only the fire can heat your room.
 
Ryzen 5000 series doesn't require Ryzen Power Plan anymore. I tried to get it, but even after updating chipset drivers, I didn't get it in my power plan list.
True enough...but then it never 'required' it before. Ryzen just responded with better performance to it. But running a 'power saving' plan doesn't help it perform to potential and isn't needed for a desktop system that doesn't have batteries to conserve or inadequate cooling.
 
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Those temperatures are absolutely nothing to be concerned about, and if you are primarily interested in maintaining low noise, you can let them go much higher than that. As was pointed out, AMD claims that the 5700G is designed to safely operate at up to 95C, and the processor will automatically throttle performance to avoid exceeding that limit.

You certainly don't have to let temperatures get that high if you want to err on the safe side in terms of long-term durability of the processor, but there's not likely much benefit in keep them down at 60C under load. And idle temperatures don't really matter much.

Problems started a few days after I booted my system for a first time - I didn't overclocked or auto-boosted my CPU at all, it's holding at base 3.6GHz clock, but idle temps with ~10% usage, with no apps/games running, are 50 C...
The base clock for the 5700G is actually 3.8GHz, and active cores should automatically boost up around 4.6GHz when presented with a workload at the processor's standard, non-overclocked settings. If it's stuck at 3.6GHz all the time, then something is likely configured wrong. What sort of clock rates are you seeing under load?
 
Nov 1, 2021
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The base clock for the 5700G is actually 3.8GHz, and active cores should automatically boost up around 4.6GHz when presented with a workload at the processor's standard, non-overclocked settings. If it's stuck at 3.6GHz all the time, then something is likely configured wrong. What sort of clock rates are you seeing under load?
Yep, under load, it's climbing all the way up to 4.6GHz, but the RPM too.. Do you maybe know, how high with the temperatures can I leave my 360 AIO on 800-900RPM? Because whenever I do something a little bit more demand than Chrome browsing, RPMs jump to 950-1000RPMs (Which sounds quiet but it actually annoyes me, because I'm not wearing headset and the PC is distanced from my ears like less than 20 centimeters..). So, can I set my fans in BIOS to run 700-800RPM even at 60C? Would that be fine?

Those temperatures are absolutely nothing to be concerned about, and if you are primarily interested in maintaining low noise, you can let them go much higher than that. As was pointed out, AMD claims that the 5700G is designed to safely operate at up to 95C
Yeah, I'm just concerned about those idle temps because I don't want to shorten CPU's life, I don't know if 50-55C can do it on 5000 series though?
 

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