[SOLVED] If cpu and gpu running on 70c and suddenly there is power failure, would it damage the system ?

ConanLock

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The system will be fine - it will not get any hotter if the power gets cut, and so will just slowly cool. However, if there is a power surge, and the PSU doesn't handle it, then this could damage components regardless of temperature. However, this should be unlikely.
 
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InvalidError

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However, if there is a power surge, and the PSU doesn't handle it, then this could damage components regardless of temperature. However, this should be unlikely.
When components get damaged by a "power line" surge, it usually is because current found a weak point between two things that are at different ground potentials and many times, the PSU actually has nothing to do with it aside from providing chassis ground through the power cable. Unstable or excessively out-of-spec outputs from the PSU (mainly caused by failing or under-spec'd output filter caps) are a whole other story and rarely related to what happens on the AC side.
 

ConanLock

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I'm in the UK so I'm not sure if it's different elsewhere, but I meant in regards to overvoltage protection in a PSU. If there is a voltage surge on the mains, then the fuse box would cut out. However, there is a very small delay, and so if the PSU cannot handle this, then it would give this overvoltage to the rest of the PC, hence the power failure, or at least the reason behind the power failure, caused damage to the system. Good quality PSUs have to a certain extent overvoltage protection. This means they could halt some potential damage.
 

InvalidError

Titan
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If there is a voltage surge on the mains, then the fuse box would cut out. However, there is a very small delay, and so if the PSU cannot handle this, then it would give this overvoltage to the rest of the PC
Fuse/breaker boxes offer absolutely no protection against surges unless you have a panel-mounted or snap-in surge suppressor. They protect against overload and in some cases such as the UK, also have RCD/GFCI functionality to protect against electrocution. Power line surge events are typically in the microseconds scale, orders of magnitude faster than the fastest household breakers. Unless the PSU is defective, power line surges have no effect on output voltages since they have no way to cross transformer isolation, which is why PCs practically always survive when the PSU goes bang due to weird stuff on the primary side such as power outages.

One of the most common casualty in nearby lightning strikes is the Ethernet port. The arc current induces a voltage difference between connected equipment and when that difference is large enough to overcome the Ethernet port's isolation, the LAN chip dies. If you are extra unlucky, the LAN chip may receive enough energy to also zap the chipset and brick the board. There isn't anything that the PSU can do about it no matter how great it is.
 

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