[SOLVED] If My System Posted, Do I Need to Update Bios?

Jul 5, 2022
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Hello,

Yesterday, I built my first PC. It posted and I was able to enter the BIOS and install Windows 10 Pro. The issue I'm having is this:

On PCPP, at the bottom, it says "Warning: The MSI PRO Z690-A WIFI DDR4 ATX LGA1700 Motherboard supports the Intel Core i7-12700K 3.6 GHz 12-Core Processor with BIOS version 7D25v11. If the motherboard is using an older BIOS version, upgrading the BIOS will be necessary to support the CPU".

In my BIOS, I have version E7D25IMS.100, build date 09/14/2021. On my motherboard's support website, it says that BIOS version 7D25v11 -- the one I need -- was released 12/13/2021. HOWEVER, on the product page of my mobo, it says it is compatible with and supports 12th Gen Intel Core.

Since my system posted and seems to have done a successful install of Windows 10, do I really need to update my BIOS? Will I run into any complications if I don't update? I am a bit hesitant to do so, as I've read many posts of people bricking their computer in the process. As they say, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. But if it needs to be done, I guess I have no choice.

Friends have also said that if it didn't post that could mean there was an incompatibility with the mobo and CPU.

Also, it got so late that I simply turned my computer off after installing Windows 10 -- no other drivers or anything else has been installed and I haven't connected to the internet yet. I saw the home screen and called it a night.

Here are two screenshots from the product page that mention CPU support. Here is a screenshot of my current BIOS version at the bottom and the version that PCPP says I need.

Thank you so much for any guidance.
 
Jul 5, 2022
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update the bios
Hey, thanks for the quick response. Update the bios even though it posted and installed Windows 10, allowing me to see the home screen? If you could help me to understand the pros/cons of updating vs not updating, I would greatly appreciate it and feel more comfortable in making my choice.
 
Jul 5, 2022
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BIOS updates are potentially for more than just CPU compatibility.
There may well be some security issues included, or other fixes.
I see, that makes sense. If I were to update, would you recommend going for the latest version -- 7D25v17 -- as opposed to the one PCPP says I should have -- 7D25v11? Truly such a shame that my mobo didn't come with the most current version, or at least 7D25v11.

A screenshot of what it says is in the newest version. Thank you.
 

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator
I'm more like if it's not broke don't fix it.

If I was having some problems that the update was for then yes.

A bad flash can brick your working PC
Many updates are for optimization, and compatibility for memory. With this being a new memory controller, on 12th gen, such optimizations are probably going to be a regular occurrence, much like Ryzen was early on. Also Intel will have microcode updates, for security flaws, that are updated via a new bios. These days, I don't shy away from bios updates.
 
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USAFRet

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I see, that makes sense. If I were to update, would you recommend going for the latest version -- 7D25v17 -- as opposed to the one PCPP says I should have -- 7D25v11? Truly such a shame that my mobo didn't come with the most current version, or at least 7D25v11.

A screenshot of what it says is in the newest version. Thank you.
That BIOS version was released July 4.
Your motherboard came off the assembly line before then. So it has what was current at the time.
 
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Hey, thanks for the quick response. Update the bios even though it posted and installed Windows 10, allowing me to see the home screen? If you could help me to understand the pros/cons of updating vs not updating, I would greatly appreciate it and feel more comfortable in making my choice.
The only reason that I see to update BIOS is it's needed for compatibility with some hardware you want to use. Otherwise I don't bother.

The biggest problem I have with motherboard manufacturers and BIOS updates is they don't tell me what the update does specifically, outside of adding support for CPUs. This is system level software at the lowest levels. I'd really like to know what it's doing before I consider pushing it.

Another problem is nobody does any A-B testing with what the update does. Performance updates? Okay, show me. RAM compatibility? I haven't had any issues with compatibility as long as it met the specs of the motherboard and none of my RAM I've used was in any QVL document. Security updates? I might consider it, but it also depends on what exactly is being fixed; if the vulnerability requires me to enable some niche feature of the board that I've left off anyway (or it was off by default), then it's not really a problem.

I'm in the camp of "if it isn't broken, don't fix it."
 
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Many updates are for optimization, and compatibility for memory. With this being a new memory controller, on 12th gen, such optimizations are probably going to be a regular occurrence, much like Ryzen was early on. Also Intel will have microcode updates, for security flaws, that are updated via a new bios. These days, I don't shy away from bios updates.
I am still debating whether or not to update, as my apprehension stems from inexperience and fear of what could go wrong during this delicate process, as well as living where computer repair shops are sparse.

Something I just recalled is that I currently only have a SanDisk Ultra 3.0 USB Flash Drive. It's a weird one that comes installed with this "Private Access Vault" and it doesn't have any flashing light indicator like a normal one would. I would have no idea if it were still reading/writing. Do you know if those programs would interfere with a BIOS flash? Perhaps, if it is safe to do so, I could just delete them from the drive.

Another question: is it best to install the latest version, which came out July of this year, or the version that PCPP recommends, which was released December of last year and is 6 versions behind? Thank you so much.
 
Another question: is it best to install the latest version, which came out July of this year, or the version that PCPP recommends, which was released December of last year and is 6 versions behind? Thank you so much.
I would argue it'd be best to install the recommended version unless the internet collective says the latest version is fine.

As a side note about "updating to the latest and greatest" BIOS update, this has actually been a pain point on AMD's side. I think the BIOS version in my motherboard is several versions behind, but considering the weird hiccups and bugs reported by people on the later versions, it sort of vindicates my decision to not update.

But yeah, this is something I say you should do a bit of research in to get enough information to come to a decision.
 
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USAFRet

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I would argue it'd be best to install the recommended version unless the internet collective says the latest version is fine.

As a side note about "updating to the latest and greatest" BIOS update, this has actually been a pain point on AMD's side. I think the BIOS version in my motherboard is several versions behind, but considering the weird hiccups and bugs reported by people on the later versions, it sort of vindicates my decision to not update.

But yeah, this is something I say you should do a bit of research in to get enough information to come to a decision.
The 'recommended version' from PCPP is just the first one that provides compatibility with the chosen CPU.
Its not because subsequent ones have any issues.

For a new system, I generally update it to whatever is current at the time.
After that, leave it until there is some issue, or a later one addresses and actual problem.
 

Zerk2012

Titan
Ambassador
Many updates are for optimization, and compatibility for memory. With this being a new memory controller, on 12th gen, such optimizations are probably going to be a regular occurrence, much like Ryzen was early on. Also Intel will have microcode updates, for security flaws, that are updated via a new bios. These days, I don't shy away from bios updates.
Your opinion and my opinion.
If everything is working no reason to update the BIOS. On my last 3 personal builds going back to the 2500K I have never updated the BIOS.

EDIT How many people do you know that have been compromised by not unsigning a update that is for security on a motherboard BIOS? I would guess 0.

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Jul 5, 2022
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Listen to the mods. Bedside manner aside, they're not gonna steer you wrong. Bios is super easy to update on modern boards at any rate. Just be patient and make sure you understand the steps.
Gotcha. And if I have a USB with my BIOS update on it (will be downloading onto a USB from my laptop), would I need a WiFi connection? I believe the most important part I read is that I can't turn the PC off.
 
Thank you all for your responses -- I am carefully considering my next step and I really appreciate everyone's opinion and help.
As you can tell there are differences of opinions about this.

I update after the bios update is at least 30 days old.

If it still on the makers site after 30 days I figure it can't be to bad broke.

If you want to get into the weenie stuff you can dig into what each update is fixing.
 
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Rogue Leader

It's a trap!
Moderator
I update after the bios update is at least 30 days old.

If it still on the makers site after 30 days I figure it can't be to bad broke.
This is what I do. Never update day 1 (unless its critical for some reason), give it a week or 2 to shake out and blow up other people's systems, then update. BIOS updates are WAY more reliable these days. I have zero concerns updating one.
 
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Jul 5, 2022
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Thanks again, everyone. I ended up contacting MSI customer support and they also recommended a BIOS update. I read the directions on my manual, watched a video uploaded by MSI (as well as other YouTubers), and received live help from an MSI CSA -- after the BIOS finished updating, I was unable to post. Thankfully, the agent had a solution, which was to get the BIOS version my mobo came with and re-flash that. I was back up and running. No idea why I wasn't able to post from the newer BIOS version, but was successful with the older one. Anyway, I will just stick with the older version until forced otherwise.
 
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