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[SOLVED] If your TPM is alright but Health Check still says no...

Borracho

Distinguished
Sep 3, 2010
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18,515
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...in all likelihood your BIOS still has CSM turned on (https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/information-protection/tpm/tpm-recommendations?ranMID=24542&ranEAID=kXQk6*ivFEQ&ranSiteID=kXQk6.ivFEQ-L4Y3IBag2y1OjqYSF_UWkw&epi=kXQk6.ivFEQ-L4Y3IBag2y1OjqYSF_UWkw&irgwc=1&OCID=AID2000142_aff_7593_1243925&tduid=(ir__hi3rbivtuskfq2mfsffd0vixgv2xuvdh06jy3gfr00)(7593)(1243925)(kXQk6.ivFEQ-L4Y3IBag2y1OjqYSF_UWkw)()&irclickid=_hi3rbivtuskfq2mfsffd0vixgv2xuvdh06jy3gfr00) .

Now I'm in a bit of a bind. I recently upgraded to an M.2 NVMe boot drive, by cloning my old SATA drive onto it. Everything worked like a charm but here's the rub:

If I turn off CSM in BIOS, the NVMe drive is not recognized at all. So the minute I set my BIOS to 'UEFI only' I have no bootable drives, no hard drives whatsoever. I did a bit of digging and read that since NVMe drives have their own native UEFI drivers in Windows, there is a possibility that some required startup or backup files are stored on a different drive. So the system attempts to read the NVMe in UEFI only but a required file is still on the legacy devices and the whole operation fails.

What gives? Anyone faced this yet? I know that the most straightforward solution would be to just format everything and start clean, but is there any lazy way to do this?

Thanks in advance!
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
there is a possibility that some required startup or backup files are stored on a different drive. So the system attempts to read the NVMe in UEFI only but a required file is still on the legacy devices and the whole operation fails.
that should only happen if you had the other drive in PC when you installed, as windows doesn't normally use other partitions on drives unless there is free space on them, and they are there during installation

you could use MBR2GPT to convert the format on the drives so that the bios actually sees it

 
Reactions: Borracho

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
there is a possibility that some required startup or backup files are stored on a different drive. So the system attempts to read the NVMe in UEFI only but a required file is still on the legacy devices and the whole operation fails.
that should only happen if you had the other drive in PC when you installed, as windows doesn't normally use other partitions on drives unless there is free space on them, and they are there during installation

you could use MBR2GPT to convert the format on the drives so that the bios actually sees it

 
Reactions: Borracho

Borracho

Distinguished
Sep 3, 2010
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That was EXACTLY what I needed, I followed the instructions and it worked like a charm! Thank you so much @Colif !

PS I had to do an additional step and shrink my current disk volume a bit before mbr2gpt validation could complete successfully, but goddamn, I'm one happy customer!
 

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