IKEA's Qi-Powered Wireless Charging Furniture To Arrive In The U.S. 'Late Spring'

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Calvin Huang

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That's pretty brilliant actually. Having the charger inlaid within the desk/appliance makes it much more usable and hides the bulk of the charger (the Jyssen charging pads are actually about the same size as most standalone Qi disks, but the exposed circular cutout is only half the diameter of the actual charging pad.
 

Engerek01

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With the amount of electro magnetic induction this may cause some series long term problems. What will be the range of that magnetic wave? What is the frequency? I hope they took precautions to avoid any damage in cell level.
Other than that it is an amazing technology. It would sort out the "do you have free plug" questions and the cable mass in starbucks.
 

joex444

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@Engerek01, please don't comment if you haven't taken college level calculus-based physics courses. The strength of a magnetic (or electric) field goes like 1/r^2. To make an example, suppose the field has strength X at 1cm - a reasonable distance for the gap between the charger and phone/device. If you stand 0.5m away (about 1.5 ft), the strength is 50^2 smaller. Or 2500 times smaller. If you're a meter away it's 100^2 or 10,000 times smaller.
 

David Cruit

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@Engerek01, please don't comment if you haven't taken college level calculus-based physics courses. The strength of a magnetic (or electric) field goes like 1/r^2. To make an example, suppose the field has strength X at 1cm - a reasonable distance for the gap between the charger and phone/device. If you stand 0.5m away (about 1.5 ft), the strength is 50^2 smaller. Or 2500 times smaller. If you're a meter away it's 100^2 or 10,000 times smaller.
That's more High School basic Physics. Just covered it.
 

Engerek01

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@Engerek01, please don't comment if you haven't taken college level calculus-based physics courses. The strength of a magnetic (or electric) field goes like 1/r^2. To make an example, suppose the field has strength X at 1cm - a reasonable distance for the gap between the charger and phone/device. If you stand 0.5m away (about 1.5 ft), the strength is 50^2 smaller. Or 2500 times smaller. If you're a meter away it's 100^2 or 10,000 times smaller.
I am a Mechanical Engineer with masters degree. What you are saying is true on paper. What you dont know is that, if even a phones microwave is strong enough to make an airplane crash, I cant start to imagine what this can do to a person in a cell level. Read articles about how cell phones increased brain tumor and cancer density in the last 10 years. Then you will start to understand the tragedy this may cause.
 

Engerek01

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I want to add something. In 2001, we asked our professor if base stations could do any harm to human body. He laughed at us and said "Even a tv power cable has stronger magnetic field." 3 years later he and his wife became cancer. He died 1 year after that. He spent that remaining 1 year explaining people how cell phones and base stations could cause cancer. You may think that 1/10.000 isnt strong enough to cause you any harm. But remember that water doesnt crack stone because of its strength but because of its persistence.
 
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