[SOLVED] Im buying new ram, should I..

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MeeLee

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Aug 27, 2014
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I would just get 2x8GB of the fastest memory modules.
My Intel Celeron came with 4GB of DDR4 SoDimm 2100Mhz, and I upgraded it with a single stick of 16GB of 2400Mhz. The laptop supposedly only supported up to 8GB sticks in a single slot, but I installed the module anyway.
Works fine.
Mem tests all passed with a <0.1% error ratio.
I also get about a 10-25% higher FPS (31 to 32FPS, or 80 to 94fps) as the IGP uses shared ram, and it makes a lot of difference (plus, I'm not pushing the RAM and needing any swap file).
 
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Apr 6, 2020
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Possibly, even identical kits may not work 100% together which is why I recommended trying both kits first and if it doesn't work then just use the new kit.
Hey, I didnt mention that my old 8 gb ram is 2133 Mhz, and the new ones are gonna be 3000 each. So I saw a video where an guy said that if one of the sticks is more than the other one, it will change the 3000 Mhz for example to the lower (2133 Mhz) Is that true?
 

WildCard999

Titan
Moderator
Memory speeds with Intel don't have the same impact as they do with AMD Ryzen, plus those older B150/B250 boards which I'm pretty sure Lenovo uses for the locked i7's only goes up to 2400mhz so even with XMP enabled it's only a small boost, if any.

Does the memory work with the existing stick?
 
Apr 6, 2020
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Memory speeds with Intel don't have the same impact as they do with AMD Ryzen, plus those older B150/B250 boards which I'm pretty sure Lenovo uses for the locked i7's only goes up to 2400mhz so even with XMP enabled it's only a small boost, if any.

Does the memory work with the existing stick?
I didnt leave the old one
 

gondo

Distinguished
Fast 16gb of RAM should be faster than slow 24GB of RAM.

If you don't need the 24GB, stick with the 16GB. If you are using up the entire 16GB of resources then adding the 24GB should speed things up, but only if you max out your 16GB which is quite difficult. The problem is your speed and timings will be set to the slowest stick of RAM which will probably be your existing 8GB.

For curiosity you could try the 24GB and check what timings your motherboard automatically set it to. Then repeat with the 16GB to test it out. And unless you use a program that can take advantage of the extra RAM like video or photoediting, then you probably won't notice the difference.
 
Apr 6, 2020
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Fast 16gb of RAM should be faster than slow 24GB of RAM.

If you don't need the 24GB, stick with the 16GB. If you are using up the entire 16GB of resources then adding the 24GB should speed things up, but only if you max out your 16GB which is quite difficult. The problem is your speed and timings will be set to the slowest stick of RAM which will probably be your existing 8GB.

For curiosity you could try the 24GB and check what timings your motherboard automatically set it to. Then repeat with the 16GB to test it out. And unless you use a program that can take advantage of the extra RAM like video or photoediting, then you probably won't notice the difference.
How can I enable XMP?
 

gondo

Distinguished
Your motherboard bios would have to have that capability. But seeing as this is a Lenovo I doubt it is, and it probably also doesn't support XMP. Icould be wrong without knowing the exact model you have.
 
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Your motherboard bios would have to have that capability. But seeing as this is a Lenovo I doubt it is, and it probably also doesn't support XMP. Icould be wrong without knowing the exact model you have.
Its Skybay, it doesnt support XMP.. I just updated the BIOS and still it doesnt. Do you know any other way to enable XMP or there is none?
 

gondo

Distinguished
XMP is bios specific. If it's not there it's not there.

There is an SMP chip on the RAM that tells the BIOS it's timings and what to use. When the computer boots it reads this and sets up the speeds automatically. XMP is a recent extension to this that adds information for optional increased timings for overclocking. It has to be built into the BIOS by the manufacturer in order to read the XMP information. All you do is enable XMP and choose some of the increased speeds. Or you can also enable manual mode and put the numbers in yourself. XMP is kind of stupid if you ask me. Every new computer should be manually inputed using the numbers on the chip and not rely on SMP. Overclocking should also be done manually and not rely on XMP.....if you don't know how to overclock then don't fool with XMP.

You need a higher end motherboard to support these manual overclocking and xmp features. In a nutshell, if you don't play with these features you can save your money and get away with a cheaper motherboard.

Your Lenovo is going to read the SMP of these 3 RAM sticks and set your speeds to the lowest or the default. You have no control over it unfortunately.
 
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