In Win Outs H-Frame Case And Limited Edition 1065 W PSU

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alidan

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So, since they're only making 500 PSUs for 500 cases, I guess when your PSU dies, you throw the case away since it's not a standard form factor and you can't get another one?
lol, no. either you make a braket yourself to make mounting it easier, or you just stick the thin in to as many holes as you have...

i have an old top mounted case, and my current psu didn't really like idea of being up there so i think only 2 screws lined up, i tightened them as much as possible and its been that way for 5 years now. next case i get is going to be horizontal so if this crap happened again, i can toss the psu in there and not worry about it falling down and crushing my build, and i can put whatever cooler i want on it because the load is not on the trying to force itself off.
 
Why would you need the fans to spin a short time after shut down? It's not like the computer's going to get any hotter.
Getting the components down to room temperature quickly may help increase their lifetime slightly. The less time the caps spend being hot at all, the better.
 

turkey3_scratch

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I guess technically, but the 1 minute they probably take to cool down is so small on the grand scheme of things.
 

nukemaster

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When the power is removed on an actively cooled device the temperature actually goes up because the device still has heat and no longer has active cooling. How much depends greatly on the heat output and heatsink size.

With the very low output idle states, most systems do not power down under load anyway.

Other companies have setup systems like this in the past(when all devices ran full speed/voltage all the time) and they never took off as an idea.
 

viewtyjoe

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So, since they're only making 500 PSUs for 500 cases, I guess when your PSU dies, you throw the case away since it's not a standard form factor and you can't get another one?
I believe another article asked In Win reps and was told that you can mount standard ATX PSUs up to a certain length just fine.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod


Really? You're going to pay this kind of money for a limited edition case, and then later, just pop any old power supply in there hanging by two screws, with a big old gap in between where the original ginormous unit mounted and the edge of the now much smaller unit? Yep, that makes sense to me.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod


How would you mount an ATX PSU up to a location that was designed for a larger form factor. Unless the mounting and rear opening on the unit were the same as what is used for a standard ATX unit, in which case, what's the point of having a proprietary unit in there (Which makes no sense anyhow. There's a reason proprietary type hardware has mostly gone the way of the Dodo bird). I guess I just don't see the point of this. I see no advantage or reason to deviate from using a standard form factor power supply. It just doesn't make sense to me. Maybe it's just me.
 

turkey3_scratch

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If I pull the cable on my computer while it's being stress tested, I don't see how the temperature is going to increase. In order for heat to be produced, there has to be current, and there is no current (except the 5VSB rail). What work would be producing more heat on the GPU/CPU than already is there? if anything is should come in contact with the air particles and cool down gradually, but I don't see a manner in which it gets hot if there is no energy.
 
If I pull the cable on my computer while it's being stress tested, I don't see how the temperature is going to increase. In order for heat to be produced, there has to be current, and there is no current (except the 5VSB rail). What work would be producing more heat on the GPU/CPU than already is there? if anything is should come in contact with the air particles and cool down gradually, but I don't see a manner in which it gets hot if there is no energy.
Turning off the power doesn't stop the flow through the components immediately because of inductors and capacitors which take a little time to bring the current down to approximately zero. The temps may increase a bit before they start decreasing from passively dissipating the remaining heat because the fans will immediately start slowing down (granted they don't immediately come to a complete stop for both the same reason and from their momentum).
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Besides that, it's no different than an engine. When air, or coolant, is flowing, when an object is at a certain temperature, it maintains that object at a certain temperature based on the amount of coolant or airflow. If you shut off the flow of air or coolant at the same time you shut down power or stop the internal combustion process, temperatures will go up for a period of time since there is no longer a source of cooling to carry exchanged heat away from the object in question.

Really, it's not much, if any, different than how foods continue to cook even after they've been removed from the heat source, which it's recommended to remove most meats slightly sooner than when they are actually done and then allow them to rest. That allows the continuation of the cooking process to complete and not result in an overcooked product.
 

nukemaster

Titan
Moderator

exaggerated example here, but take an 100 watt bulb and have a fan on it for an hour, at that point shut both off. the bulb will get warmer because it has lots of build up heat that was being removed faster by the fan.

This is also the reason many projectors have fans that stay on after the unit is turned off to ensure the bulb life is not shortened.

Actively cooled devices just behave differently than passively cooled ones.

This increase in temperature is taken into consideration by the device designer(or should be). It is not like a cpu will be damaged.

If I had an IR camera, I would be all over seeing how much, but I think I would use a regulator(non switching) or something else to generate the heat. This would be lower wattage and more easy to control(it could even power the fan :p).
 

f-14

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So, since they're only making 500 PSUs for 500 cases, I guess when your PSU dies, you throw the case away since it's not a standard form factor and you can't get another one?
lol, no. either you make a braket yourself to make mounting it easier, or you just stick the thin in to as many holes as you have...

i have an old top mounted case, and my current psu didn't really like idea of being up there so i think only 2 screws lined up, i tightened them as much as possible and its been that way for 5 years now. next case i get is going to be horizontal so if this crap happened again, i can toss the psu in there and not worry about it falling down and crushing my build, and i can put whatever cooler i want on it because the load is not on the trying to force itself off.
double sided automotive tape my friend, the hotter it gets the better it sticks. you need to put dry ice on the case where it's applied to remove it easily tho, other wise get a putty knife to scrape it loose. it needs to be colda bit colder than 0ºC to remove decent, the colder the quicker.
 

Quixit

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So, since they're only making 500 PSUs for 500 cases, I guess when your PSU dies, you throw the case away since it's not a standard form factor and you can't get another one?
lol, no. either you make a braket yourself to make mounting it easier, or you just stick the thin in to as many holes as you have...

i have an old top mounted case, and my current psu didn't really like idea of being up there so i think only 2 screws lined up, i tightened them as much as possible and its been that way for 5 years now. next case i get is going to be horizontal so if this crap happened again, i can toss the psu in there and not worry about it falling down and crushing my build, and i can put whatever cooler i want on it because the load is not on the trying to force itself off.
double sided automotive tape my friend, the hotter it gets the better it sticks. you need to put dry ice on the case where it's applied to remove it easily tho, other wise get a putty knife to scrape it loose. it needs to be colda bit colder than 0ºC to remove decent, the colder the quicker.
Or you could just remove the internals from your ATX PSU and attach them to the casing from the original PSU so that OEM look. That's what I'd likely do in that situation.
 

rwinches

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Car radiator electric fans keep running after the engine is turned off to allow for the heat rise.
A meat roast that is 118 degrees rises to ~135-140 in fifteen minutes when covered with foil.

I would like it if the CPU fan ran a couple of minutes after shutdown case fans too.

Definitely would extend system life on a gaming rig.
 
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