Question In your opinion, what is a stable overclocked system.

Dec 17, 2019
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I would like to know how you guys determine if your system is stable. At the moment, I'm running a Ryzen 1700 clocked at 3.9ghz (1.375v). The ram has been overclocked from 3000 to 3133 as I cannot avoid blue screen with 3200 ram speed. I do have 4 sticks installed at this time so maybe it is a memory compatibility issue. Maybe my modules' b die is down binned for a reason.

The system cannot pass cinabench R20 at the same exact spot when it will shut down but for daily usage, it is fine, no blue screens, no random shut down. So can I consider this is a stable system?
 
I would like to know how you guys determine if your system is stable. At the moment, I'm running a Ryzen 1700 clocked at 3.9ghz (1.375v). The ram has been overclocked from 3000 to 3133 as I cannot avoid blue screen with 3200 ram speed. I do have 4 sticks installed at this time so maybe it is a memory compatibility issue. Maybe my modules' b die is down binned for a reason.

The system cannot pass cinabench R20 at the same exact spot when it will shut down but for daily usage, it is fine, no blue screens, no random shut down. So can I consider this is a stable system?
If it was failing at Prime95 I'd be less worried but Cinebench R20 really is a normal "real-world" workload so it should pass that.

From 1.375V you can safely up the voltage for your 1700 some more. You shouldn't have to be worried until getting above 1.4V, try to stay under 1.425V as a maximum (AMD used to say 1.45V was the safe maximum for reference). Assuming, of course, you have sufficient cooling to keep temp in control.

By the way, if your motherboard supports I'd try to use offset voltage adjustment.

Ryzen 1000 really dislikes 2 DIMM's per channel so I'd agree that's a big reason for not making 3200. Even 3133 sounds pretty darn good, though; be sure to run a good memory test. A proper memory test should take a very long time to complete but take it out to completion. Memory should be rock-stable even for daily use as it can silently corrupt your whole hard-drive without knowing it.

Lastly: get the processor overclock stable first, with memory at stock settings. Then, knowing the processor should pass anything thrown at it, overclock and test memory. This way you'll know it's the memory overclock, not the processor, that's causing the fail.
 
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