Question increase in cpu voltage

amitdad.playboy99

Prominent
Jun 25, 2018
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my specs are
i7 8700 non k
16gb ram at 3000mhz
gtx 1080ti
asus z370 f gaming board
750 watt psu
as you can see i have only a overclocked ram but no overclockable cpu
so when i go to my bios settings to enable xmp profile for ram so it may run at 3000mhz my cpu voltages goes from 1.012 to 1.350 and temperature increases by 5 degrees
is it safe to be running i7 8700 non k like that on that voltage i have a 120mm coolermaster aio for cooling
when running at 1.012 volts the cpu temp goes to max 77 and at 1.350 it reaches 82-85
i live in a hot and humid area so temps are generallly high
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Are you using the stock CPU cooler? If so, get a better CPU cooler.

Your change in CPU temperature is normal due to the change in DRAM voltage, however anything over 80°C is higher than you want to see on CPU temperatures.

What kind of case cooling do you have.

What is your case model, where do you have case fans installed and in what direction is each and every fan blowing?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That cooler is meant for a much lower TDP processor. While the base clock TDP of that unit is only 65w, the all core boosted TDP is more like 115w, and that 120mm cooler is not capable enough to handle that under any kind of sustained loads which is obvious from your higher than recommended maximum peak temperatures.

Any modern i7 system should have at least a 240mm cooler if you are using an AIO or a good 140mm cooler if on air. It matters, because you are out of spec on your thermal compliance. Don't ignore this and think you know better. This is important to the longevity of your CPU.

As far as the DRAM causing your CPU voltage to increase, it's possible that the system is making stability changes to the CPU configuration. Remember, the memory controller is IN the CPU, so changes to core behavior including core voltage, frequency and boost behavior, system agent voltage, VCCIO voltage and a variety of other automatic changes are likely to occur.

Also, depending on the board, when you enable XMP it will probably ask you if you want to apply the ASUS enhancements as well. When it did, did you say yes or did you choose to run it at the Intel default configuration. You should always choose NO when asked if you want to also apply the ASUS enhancements along with the XMP profile settings.
 

amitdad.playboy99

Prominent
Jun 25, 2018
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thanks for detailed info
when i bought all the components the store guy recommend that 120 will be fine for non k i7 i wont be needing the 240
and i think i selected no for asus enhancements
so what i have done now is bot use the xmp profile but instead manually set the ram speed to 2996 mhz that is what is shown in bios not 3000
so now my temps remain in mid 70
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I would try the following, because it's likely you are not getting the full benefit of the timings included in your memory kits XMP profile when using auto settings for the timings, and I mean secondary and tertiary timings in addition to the primary timings. One changed secondary or tertiary timing could have a profound impact on other timings and on overall memory performance.

Do a hard reset of the BIOS as follows, and then go back into the BIOS and try setting the XMP profile again but this time be SURE to NOT choose the ASUS enhanced core settings. Before doing so, make SURE you have the most recent BIOS firmware version for your motherboard installed.

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.
 

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