Infiniti JX35: One Step Away From the Self-Driving Car

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A Bad Day

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Although there's nothing wrong with more safety features, it's still important to let customers know that responsibility is still required.

- In the 1970 or 80's, a cruise ship equipped with the latest radar system was rammed and sunk by another one only a few miles from NYC (or some other major city). It turned out the radar operator went to bed before the ramming occurred.

- In the 2000's, a cargo plane and a passenger charter plane (with kids on board) rammed into each other over southern Germany. Both aircraft had the same crash-avoidance system that was capable of negotiating of who should descend and who should ascend. However, the passenger plane's pilots received trainings different from the cargo plane's pilots, causing them to both ascend instead. On the ground, the airport that was managing the airspace did not have an operational phone system or radar system for the air traffic control because both were down for maintenance.

- Statistics show that drivers with anti-lock and other safety features equipped in their cars tend to drive faster and perform more risky behaviors than drivers without such features.
 

A Bad Day

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[citation][nom]-Jackson[/nom]A self driving car.. What could go wrong?[/citation]

I would trust a computer more than a drunken/sleep-deprived or incompetent driver.

I've drove a car while sleep-deprived a few times. It's very frightening for your consciousness to fade in and out.
 

bak0n

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I can't wait to push stuff out in front of these cars, cut them off just to watch them react (or not) and otherwise harass them into brokenness.
 

-Jackson

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Who in their right mind would decide to drive their car whilst sleep-deprived?
 

A Bad Day

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[citation][nom]-Jackson[/nom]Who in their right mind would decide to drive their car whilst sleep-deprived?[/citation]

When I enter the car, I feel okay.

30 minutes into driving, I don't feel so okay.

And I usually have to keep driving because of my schedule.
 

CaedenV

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[citation][nom]A Bad Day[/nom]I would trust a computer more than a drunken/sleep-deprived or incompetent driver.I've drove a car while sleep-deprived a few times. It's very frightening for your consciousness to fade in and out.[/citation]
Same here, when I use to work night shifts I got all messed up, and more than once found myself waking up in bed without really knowing how I got there. Sleep deprivation is WAY more dangerous than drinking (though drinking is not good either). But now that I have a decent day job I can't wait to have a self driving car simply because I would rather spend that commute time working, or prepping for work, so that when I walk in the door I am ready to go.
 

g-unit1111

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My new Nissan's BSW / lane departure system is pretty awesome (similar to the Infiniti) but that thing is way more advanced. I guess if you've got the money for an Infiniti JX, they have to put a lot more advanced features to justify the cost.
 

sacre

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[citation][nom]bak0n[/nom]I can't wait to push stuff out in front of these cars, cut them off just to watch them react (or not) and otherwise harass them into brokenness.[/citation]


Computer would react faster than a human would. You can do this with people too bud.

A person, if using cruise control, don't even have their foot over the brake/gas pedal, they would have to see the object, lift their foot, place it over, slam the foot down whilst steering away. All this would take nearly a second.

A computer system? As soon as the lens detects movement, it would instantly place the brakes and begin its avoidance.

Computer systems are faster than our nervous systems.
 

A Bad Day

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[citation][nom]sacre[/nom]Computer would react faster than a human would. You can do this with people too bud.A person, if using cruise control, don't even have their foot over the brake/gas pedal, they would have to see the object, lift their foot, place it over, slam the foot down whilst steering away. All this would take nearly a second.A computer system? As soon as the lens detects movement, it would instantly place the brakes and begin its avoidance.Computer systems are faster than our nervous systems.[/citation]

The only issue is object detection.

But I suppose the computer would have better object detection than some people, or have other skills that outclass them.
 

neuromancer2701

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I was at the Mercedes-Benz in Alabama last year some of the newer designed models have an advanced lane avoidance system. You can see the motor that is added to the steering column so they do even farther than just braking. All of the control systems(acceleration, braking, turning, gps) are now in these cars so it is just a matter of software to tie it all together.
 
G

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These ideas are all fine on paper, but to truly put any self driving car to the test, is to test it in extreme conditions, think about the following:

How will the car assess a situation where the snow on the road might be too much, making it not sane to attempt a hill or similiar?

Will the car know to reduce its antislip in order to get unstuck from mud/snow and do rocking motion back n forth?

Will the self driving car see the road if the road is not to be seen, where common sense is currently only useful?

How will the car see ice and choose the appropriate distance from the car in front or know to start braking much sooner when slippery?

I believe we will soon start seeing self driving cars that work fine in optimal conditions, but making them more clever than common sense sounds nearly impossible to me.

 
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